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1965 Electra A/C


Alfalfus

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I have a '65 Electra with 22,00 original miles. The A/C compressor is spewing fluid. I would like to keep it original but the local A/C guy believes the A/C valves are also shot and says to upgrade to a more efficient system ( for $900). The only things not original on the car are fuel pump ( I have the old one), tires and battery. Otherwise, the car is probably a 2. I will probably have to sell the car next year and need advice about what to do about the A/c. Thanks for you help.

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I have a '65 Electra with 22,00 original miles. The A/C compressor is spewing fluid. I would like to keep it original but the local A/C guy believes the A/C valves are also shot and says to upgrade to a more efficient system ( for $900). The only things not original on the car are fuel pump ( I have the old one), tires and battery. Otherwise, the car is probably a 2. I will probably have to sell the car next year and need advice about what to do about the A/c. Thanks for you help.

I assume your Buick uses the large A6 compressor. Rebuild the original or install a similar rebuilt unit. It will work fine, even with R134 instead of R12.

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I agree with Joe.

A-6 compresors are plentiful.

However...

If you plan to sell the car within a year, why bother. I doubt you'd get your money back, and you probably won't need AC in the coming months. Let the next owner decide what to do.

Jim Eccleston

1961 Coupe de Ville

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I also agree with Joe. You can get a reman compressor for under $200. and if you have a frend in the parts store less than that. R12 is still available but a little pricy. Maby $35-40. a lb. You need 3 lbs. A Conversion kit at the local advanse auto will cost you about $40. and comes with everything you need including the 134 and oil. You will get more out of it if its right and working and if you dont sell it you will be glad you fixed it. Just mho.:)

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Alfalfus,

I'm not sure what your friend meant by a 'more efficient system' but if it includes modifying the car to use anything other than a rebuilt A6 'torpedo' compressor, find another shop!

The brackets for that compressor are almost worth their weight in gold, because anyone who tried to modify the 401 nailhead into a hot rod in 'the good old days' would almost always disconnect the A/C equipment and throw the parts away. Now that so many people are trying to go back to OEM in so many 1960's cars, the compressors and A/C parts are available, but those mounting pieces are very hard to find.

Go to a shop that can supply a good rebuilt A-6, replace the dryer and O-rings, possibly replace the rubber used in the freon hoses, flush and refill the system and fill it with R-134a if necessary. But DON'T let anyone try to make a pancake or other compressor fit into that application.

Joe

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The A-6 with R12 in it throws ice cubes at you when it's running right. 134 is garbage freon that we now have forced on us. Rebuild your old compressor or at least hang on to it as a core. Because the seals leaked some freon is no reason to junk it. Yes, you can convert it to R134 but at least try to find the R12 it was designed for.

An AACA member was selling a 30lb of R12 a few months back. He may still have it.

Good luck.

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The A-6 with R12 in it throws ice cubes at you when it's running right. 134 is garbage freon that we now have forced on us. Rebuild your old compressor or at least hang on to it as a core. Because the seals leaked some freon is no reason to junk it. Yes, you can convert it to R134 but at least try to find the R12 it was designed for.

An AACA member was selling a 30lb of R12 a few months back. He may still have it.

Good luck.

Washington DC is certainly not Florida (though it sometimes seems like it in the summer), but I recently replaced my A/C compressor and converted from R12 to R134. With a rebuilt compressor, new orifice tube and accumlator/drier, flushed-out system, and a proper load of R134, I was amazed at how well the system cooled.

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Darn I just sold a bunch of those compressors for $20 each.. I don't need AC here...

Are you sure the O-rings don't need replaced at the hose coupling...

Actually, I did replace all the O-rings in my system when I replaced the compressor. This also let me flush each line individually. A pack of R134 O-rings runs about $6 at Advance Auto or Rockauto.com.

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