unimogjohn

Avanti R2, 1963, refresh

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It is Friday.  The Passat W8 is officially done.  Took under an hour to install the new rotor and pads on the final wheel.  Slowly pumped the pedal three times to get a firm pedal and then was off for a test drive.  Happy with the results, she stops on a dime.  Good for another ten years at least. Here are all the old parts.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, unimogjohn said:

It is Friday.  The Passat W8 is officially done.  Took under an hour to install the new rotor and pads on the final wheel.  Slowly pumped the pedal three times to get a firm pedal and then was off for a test drive.  Happy with the results, she stops on a dime.  Good for another ten years at least. Here are all the old parts.

 

 

John, you and I must think alike :). My wife and I went into one of our favorite little small town restaurants for lunch today, and I asked them why the normal Friday special Rueben was not on the board. The cook answered "Ahh......because it's just Thursday?" :lol:

 

For some reason we are both thinking it's Friday.  

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Paul, you got me.  I must have been thinking of what I can do tomorrow, which I now know is FRIDAY.  Gee, now I have an extra day.  Joe (packick) usually catches me and sends an email so I can change the day.  He must be slipping.

 

Speaking of tomorrow, I just received the lug nuts and rubber door seals for Dexter, the Morris Traveller.  Looks like Alice will have to move it back into the garage so I can do some work.  Going to rain heavy tonight and tomorrow morning so it will be a good day to work inside.

 

 

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John

I am wondering why you did not mention flushing the brake fluid while replacing all the brake discs/pads on the Passat? Has that been done recently?

Jim

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Jim, I did, forgot to mention it.  Easy job with the Motive pressure bleeder, it only took about 15 minutes.  

 

So excited that I got the two lug nuts for the Traveller.  Ran out in the rain to the garage and put them on.  I feel much safer now.

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It is Friday afternoon May 5th.  In between farm chores I was able to spend some time with Dexter.  Time to fit the new door seals.  I pulled off the old storm door seals and moulding.  They just practically fell off.  Then I fitted the new seals around the door frame and seated each section with a rubber ended hammer.  It went on pretty easily, and fit perfectly.  They look a whole lot better than the junk that was on there.  The bottom of the door has two seals, will do them over the weekend.  Here are today's pictures.

 

 

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Nice...isn't it fun to get a car that just needs a little sorting out, and you can enjoy driving it from the get-go!

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57 minutes ago, trimacar said:

Nice...isn't it fun to get a car that just needs a little sorting out, and you can enjoy driving it from the get-go!

 

I was that smart only once - on my first collector car. All the ones I've bought since needed a lot of work. :(

 

Guess instead of getting smarter, I got dumber......

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Sunday, May 7th.  Opps, went to start the Traveller and just clicking.  Battery is good, fully charged, but the solenoid is suspect so I ordered a new one plus two new battery cables.  The total cost was about $65 to my door.

 

 In the meantime Jon came over with his 1936 Hudson Terraplane to replace the front brake shoes.  Seems that the front brake cylinder leaked silicon fluid over the brake shoes and now the car is pulling.  He borrowed a spare set and put them on in a couple of hours.  Hope that they work out for him.  

 

Jon said that he has owned the car since 1971 and his cost at that time was $500.  That was pretty big bucks back then, at least a couple of weeks of wages.

 

 

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Not meaning to be a smarty pants, but I have a serious question. Why do people use silicone brake fluid? I heard bad stuff about it.

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Chris, from what I understand, it does not absorb water.  Hence, you never need to change it unless you have a seal failure.  Lots of folks recommend not using it.  I have never used it, and Jon is the only person I know using the stuff.

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Thanks John, I've wondered about it for some time now, since I read that it's a very difficult fluid to use. If you accidentally knock the can or a small earth tremor happens you have to wait three days for the bubbles to dissipate in the fluid. That sort of thing. I'll stick with synthetic thanks.

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On my 3 old cars, I'm using silicone brake fluid. No problem about that. The brake system may be a little more difficult tu purge, but not that difficult.

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My understanding is there are three principal advantages in DOT 5 fluid: not hydroscopic so no changing fluid each two or three years and no brake fade due to water in the fluid vaporising under heavy usage, plus it doesn't attack paint. I haven't checked the boiling points.

 

I think, Seventh Son, you are repeating prejudice and hearsay. Surely the only way to entrain air is to shake it vigorously (or get an air lock in your pipes). The only other problems are the compatibility of the rubber parts with silicone and the requirement to flush out all glycol-based fluid with alcohol before even considering putting in silicone.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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Sunday, May 14th.  Happy Mother's Day!  Hope that you all remembered you mom.

 

I put a new solenoid into the Morris Traveller this morning.  He, Dexter, fired right up.

 

And for your viewing pleasure a neat little video about the Morris Minor.  The video was made in 1992, well after the last Morris Minor 1000 was built.   

 

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On 5/8/2017 at 6:43 PM, unimogjohn said:

Chris, from what I understand, it does not absorb water.  Hence, you never need to change it unless you have a seal failure.  Lots of folks recommend not using it.  I have never used it, and Jon is the only person I know using the stuff.

I have DOT5 fluid in two vehicles - a '64 Studebaker Commander, and a '55 Studebaker 1/2 ton pickup. Both have had this fluid in them for 25+ years. I plan at some point "soon" (this year?) to pull the wheel cylinders and master cylinder on the '64 and do a 'real life' report on how the DOT5 has done long term. I'm especially curious to see if the rubber parts have stayed supple or whether they have hardened as some predicted would happen with the DOT5. 

 

Paul

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Interesting Paul, I assume there is no "mushy pedal" or you probably wouldn't have kept it for 25 years. I look forward to seeing your report on the rubber components.

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18 minutes ago, SeventhSon said:

Interesting Paul, I assume there is no "mushy pedal" or you probably wouldn't have kept it for 25 years. I look forward to seeing your report on the rubber components.

Chris, both had really good pedals, and didn't seem to require any more bleeding than regular DOT3/DOT4 fluid. Every piece on both systems was brand new, including metal lines.

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Just curious Paul, how many miles would you say you drove those two vehicles over 25 years? 

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8 hours ago, SeventhSon said:

Just curious Paul, how many miles would you say you drove those two vehicles over 25 years? 

 

Chris, not sure. I'd guess 20K on the truck, since it was my daily driver for quite a while. Maybe 10K on the Commander.

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Paul, it will be great to get your assessment.

 

It is Tuesday, May 16th.  I got the new solenoid into the Traveller yesterday.  Started up every time, but this morning, nothing, just the solenoid clicking away.  So turned my attention to the starter itself.  I looked at the cable first, and it looked good for its age.  Then I checked the connection to the starter itself.  The post was a bit loose so tightened it up a bit, and Dexter started right up.  So I pulled the cable off the starter.  It was held on by a nut and a big washer.  Upon inspection, the washer was riding up and over the cable insulation.  This was causing the nut holding on the cable not to make a good contact with the starter post.  So I removed the washer, cleaned up all the nuts and the post, and put everything back on.  Started right up.  I left the washer off.  So will try this for a bit and see if it fixed the problem.  If not, then it is the starter itself.  

 

I will keep the old solenoid as the same one is used on the Jaguar XK120.  

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John- Still faithfully following this thread even though I don't chime in much.  Dexter is kinda cute but too small for me to even get in I bet!  I finally got my Avanti sorted out after the trouble last early summer.  New points, rotor, cap, condenser and much retiming would not stop the intermittent backfires coming from the left bank.  Finally went to do a compression test thinking head gasket, broken valve spring or something else pretty serious.  The plugs looked awful

- wet with oil, burnt porcelain, the gap actually bridged and closed by buildup on 2 and 3.  Put in new plugs, checked/reset the timing and she ran well for a nice long powerful, cool ride this evening!  I am a happy camper!! 

 

I got new valve stem seals and will put them in to slow the oil leakage into the cylinders which is wetting the plugs and the compression numbers were fine (160,155,145,155) for the left side.  The one small nagging problem is the clutch pedal rattles very noisily in the cabin.  I think the nylon bushings on the pivot arm are worn out or gone.  Do you know of a source for these little gems or ever had this problem and it might be something else?  I can feather the pedal to quiet it or push sideways on it helps but it is very noisy and annoying when in the car.  I have the shop and parts manuals but the Stude part number is probably not too useful.

 

Any help would be appreciated on where to get these bushings, thanks in advance,

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It is Thursday, May 18th.  I am sick!  I have some strange disease.  Bottom line, I am doomed.  So I am on the hunt.

 

By Biser Todorov (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

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