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Removing rear drums...


Guest J&B motorsports

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Guest J&B motorsports

I need a little help. I have a 1953 plymouth cranbrook 2 door I need to get the rear drums off to do a repair. Do I need a hub puller to get the drum off?

Thanks.

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Guest CCCasper

Try this before using the puller, remove the axle nut and washer then replace the axle nut backwards even with the axle then give the axle a good wack with a sledge, works best if someone pulls on the tire/wheel at the same time.

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Try this before using the puller, remove the axle nut and washer then replace the axle nut backwards even with the axle then give the axle a good wack with a sledge, works best if someone pulls on the tire/wheel at the same time.

And then pull the axle and replace all the bearings you just damaged. :(

Buy or rent the appropriate heavy duty drum puller. There will be a cross piece that fits on the hex head that you can beat on with a hand sledge.

When you put the puller on, first thread the nut back on the axle shaft so that there is some space between it and the drum. This does two things:

1. Protect the threads on the axle against damage by the puller.

2. Keeps the drum and puller from flying across the room when a tightly stuck drum come free. (Mine have never been that tight but I've heard stories.)

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Guest CCCasper

Everybody to their oppion, I've worked on Chrysler products for 50 years and that way can be safely done, I have never ruined a bearing and it is not by luck. Think about the puller, you put pressure on the axle/drum then wack it with a hammer. Chrysler in the 50's came out with a hub knocker tool that work just about every time.

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With a puller the tension force is between the drum and axle. The bearings are not involved at all. When you just WHACK the axle with a BFH you are driving the axle/drum assembly back and forcing the bearing rollers into the races. Will this ruin them? Who knows but it isn't doing them any good. Another home made way to loosen the drum is to back off the axle nut a couple of turns and drive in tight circles on a paved surface with the loose nut to the outside. I never tried it.

I had to use the proper puller, heat the hub a bit (not red) and wail away on the puller with a BFH. When they broke loose it sounded like a pistol shot.

I reassemble with a VERY thin coat of anti sieze. The book says they should be dry but there is a very beefy drive key and I would never heavily work them............Bob

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Guest DeSoto Frank

Use the proper puller.

The hub / shaft should go together dry, and the axle-nut tightened to a minimum of 150 ft/lbs torque. That "beefy key" can shear; the hub/axle shaft are supposed to be locked together by an "interference fit . If the axle-nut is not tight enough, you will hear a "ping!" or "crink!" when going from forward to reverse torque or vice-versa.

Do not heat the hub, do not pound on the end of the axle with a BFH.

The ideal puller has the big "dog-bone" on the screw-shaft, best whacked with a dead-blow or lead hammer.

Tod's proceedure is a good one.

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Use the proper puller.

The hub / shaft should go together dry, and the axle-nut tightened to a minimum of 150 ft/lbs torque. That "beefy key" can shear; the hub/axle shaft are supposed to be locked together by an "interference fit . If the axle-nut is not tight enough, you will hear a "ping!" or "crink!" when going from forward to reverse torque or vice-versa.

Do not heat the hub, do not pound on the end of the axle with a BFH.

The ideal puller has the big "dog-bone" on the screw-shaft, best whacked with a dead-blow or lead hammer.

Tod's proceedure is a good one.

A "bit" of heat ( under 400 F) on the hub will do no damage to any thing but will expand the hub. Since the hub fit is a locking taper a little expansion goes a long way. The "book" does say use a dry fit. The book also assumes the worst cases of lead footed abuse. The dry/anti sieze debate has adherants on both sides of the issue. I can't say if there is a correct answer but I'll opt for a VERY lite coat of anti sieze and corrosion free hubs and axles. The ultimate answer would have been for Chrysler to abandon an inferior arrangement, but what is, is..............Bob

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