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JimNap

Twin late 30's HD trucks

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Can anyone help identify the two heavy-duty late 30's trucks seen in the pictures attached?

I have not seen the trucks up close or in person and can't read the tag along the hood.

Seems unique - then again maybe not. An I.D. of each (seems same mfg.), and any background would be appreciated.

Jim

Green truck:

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Red truck:

DSC07156.jpg

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GMC but what really is the question to me is that it seems one is left hand drive and one right hand drive????

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GMC but what really is the question to me is that it seems one is left hand drive and one right hand drive????

Thanks for pointing that out. At first I thought maybe the picture provided to me was reversed, but not so as evidenced by Mickey Mouse!

Any sense of current or potential/restored value?

Jim

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The green one looks like a '41-'47 GMC.

The red one looks like a '41 to '47 as well, but the cab and dashboard are unusual:

Note the vents in the cowl pillars, the split individual windshields that open independently, and the dash - looks like '36-'40 dash / gauge clusters.

Red truck also has a Hydro-Vac remote power-brake unit, as well as the bogey 3rd axle...

Value ???

That's tough... if they have titles, maybe $500 - $700 each ?

The red truck is definitely a heavy-duty model and is the more unusual... if they both have their correct GMC engines, the value increases a bit.

Wonder if Red is from Oz ?

De Soto Frank

( PS: Didn't notice the chain-drive between the two rear axles - first time I've seen that trick ! Cool !)

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I think the chain drive idea was an old one when used on aftermarket bogies for Model A Ford trucks.

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The red truck is definitely a heavy-duty model and is the more unusual... if they both have their correct GMC engines, the value increases a bit.

Wonder if Red is from Oz ?

De Soto Frank

( PS: Didn't notice the chain-drive between the two rear axles - first time I've seen that trick ! Cool !)

I also hadn't noticed the chain drive at first either! That is cool!

As for the split opening windshiled, i didnt think that was so unusual at first but looking at pics of other HD GMC's I see that it wasnt so common afterall.

As for engine... no engine pic available for the green one, but I did get a pic of the red engine (part of it anyway) and 2 more detailed photos of the chain drive. Initial posting limit was 10 pics... enjoy!

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Jim

P.S. I might be looking to place these two rigs with a deserving new home! Still in the process of saving from the crusher.

Edited by JimNap
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All the Ozzie war jobs had the cut away front mudguards [for desert work] and extra ventilation.

U can still find them in farm sheds.

Don't know about the chain drive.

Manuel in Oz

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They're both worthy of salvation.

The tandem-rear / chain-drive /RH Drive truck has a lot of unique features going for it.

I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of '41-'47 GMC trucks I have seen in my 40 + years. Have seen many Chevies.

Would be nice if these were both saved.

De Soto Frank

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That red one has several unusual details, notice the circular embossing on the inner metal door panel? The independent windshield panels are unlike any I have seen on these trucks before. I own one GMC of this vintage and two Maple Leaf's {Canadian market Chevy's} The chain drive set up definitely appears aftermarket.

Greg in Canada

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These are both GMC's (the hood side plate reads General Motors Truck). I wonder if the red truck was at the beginning of civilian production after WW2? I pose this question as I had a 1945 Studebaker M-15 C-9 that carried over the cab that was used on the US 6 trucks. While the pre (and post war) civilian models had fiber door panels, the military used metal. In addition, they also had metal glove boxes and top mounted wipers. Can anyone comment if this is also the case with GMC?

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The red one appears to have been a dump truck. The angled back end of the frame rails is to clear a dump body when raised.

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I just noticed that the instrument panel on the red truck is in the middle while it is in front of the driver in the green truck.

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There is an Ozzie one on Oz flee bay at the moment with a couple of good pics.

Item number:170383745175

Its a desert job as well.

Manuel in Oz

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The green truck is typical of '41-'47 Chevy and medium-duty GMC.

The red truck is a bit more puzzling... I haven't been able to put my hands on my 1920-1985 Truckspotter, but when I do, I will scour the GMC section for more clues on the cab.

GMC tended to have more variety of cabs / grilles during a given model year than did Chevy.

Don't think that Red is a military truck, at least not US Military - those models had non-civilian instrumentation, and numerous etched aluminum instruction plates rivetted to the dash.

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More info !

Finally found where my better-half hid my "TruckSpotter's Gude" !

Red truck is getting more intriguing.

The front clip (fenders / hood /grille) are definitely '41-'47 GMC...

Cab is GMC too, but the '36-'40 style... this explains the individual windshields, the moulding that runs straight over the center of the cab roof, the change in belt-line profile between the cab and the hood, the early-style dash, the vent doors in the cowl pillars, the door handle location ( below the belt line ), and so on.

Compare the cab details on the green truck to the red truck, and these subtle differences will reveal themselves.

GMC continued to use the '36-'40 cab on the heavier-duty trucks well into the 1940's...

Neat stuff - keep us posted !

:)

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Green one looks chevy to me- red one dodge but what do I know?

The Green one says "General Motors Truck" right down the side of the hood. Hence. GMC. The red one also seens to have the insignia in the same place. Dandy Dave!

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