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Cox Brass crankless starter info


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I have a 1913 Overland with the Cox Brass starter in the dash, but nothing else.....I have found a little literature about it, anybody have parts they wish to sell?

It looks like I need the prestolite tank, and carb fittings, not sure about ignition for this gizmo

post-57578-143138100556_thumb.jpg

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If you pull the knob, it lets Acetylene into the cylinders, the spark plugs ignite the charge to start the engine. Then gasoline takes over. Not a great idea……

I would leave the control on the dash and dummy the plumbing for affect. People love to see that stuff….

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The ignition for this would be the stock (Overland supplied ) existing setup which would provide a spark to the appropriate cylinder ( with engine stopped) using a battery for power. This ignition can also be used to start the car without hand cranking ( and without the Cox starter) if when you stop the engine, you rev the engine a bit and turn off the ignition. This will prime the cylinders and when you want to start, turning on the spark will ignite the charge and frequently will start the engine. Ask most Model T Ford owners!!! It is called "starting on the spark".

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Many early brass carbs have a water heated jacket in the body of the carb. The 2 connections may be for water.

Some acetylene starters have an intake manifold injection but most only go directly into the cylinders as previously noted.

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Crankless Gasoline Primer supplies an evaporized mixture of gasoline to a point in the inlet manifold close to the cylinders in order that the motor will respond promptly to the electric starter and reduce the current consumption and wear on the starting device Besides this its object is to make starting more certain The crankless primer consists of the valve casing containing two valves The casing is mounted on the inside of the dash Projecting on the inside of the dash is a valve stem made of selected Tobin bronze on which is mounted a lock nut and nickel plated foot button Should the starter not operate quickly the foot button is pressed allowing a mixture of gasoline and air to be forced into the manifold As shown in the illustration Fig 2 the gasoline is taken from the feed pipe between the carbureter and the tank The two valves draw in the gasoline and air and a pressure on the button forces the mixture into the manifold This device is made by the Cox Brass Mfg Co Boston Mass

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  • 4 months later...

I have a 1913 Overland Model 69TC which is equipped with the Cox Crankless Starter. The system consists of (1) the firewall-mounted valve and nameplate shown in the original post - this valve is foot-operated, opening a valve which is normally held closed by a spring, (2) a cast bronze tee fitting at the Prest-O-Lite tank - this fitting has two manually-operated (via the small, square-holed Prest-O-Lite wrench) valves, one leading to the headlights via 1/4" brass tubing and the other leading to the firewall-mounted valve via 1/8" brass tubing. There is another 1/4" brass tube running from the firewall-mounted valve to the intake manifold above the carburetor.

The procedure, as I understand it, is carried out when shutting-down after running. The Ignition is switched to "O" (Off) via the REMY Coil-Switch and while the engine is still turning, the valve is pressed with the foot, allowing the last intake stroke to draw acetylene in. In theory, this cylinder will stop at top dead center ready to fire. Depending on the condition of the engine's valves and rings this condition would persist for some undetermined length of time. The operator would, at that time, switch the REMY Coil-Switch to "B" (Battery) and merely press the button on the REMY Coil-Switch, operating a contact in parallel with the ignition points in the REMY magneto, causing a spark, igniting the acetylene and starting the engine. This is a one-shot deal, if it doesn't start you're cranking.

This is exactly like "starting on the spark" but with an acetylene assist.

The threaded plugs in the Schebler carburetor are for water-jacketing - a feature that Overland did not utilize.

I can supply photos of the set-up on my car if there is interest.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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