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Roger Walling

Best Storage Conditions?

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A thread about "Barn Finds" leads to these questions, what are the best conditions for storage?

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Would a tarp under the car add protection from a damp floor or ground?<O:p

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Is a well-ventilated shed a good place, or would a sealed garage be best?<O:p

<O:p

Does a tarp over the car in outside storage cause, or stop corrosion?

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Short of a true climate controlled space, the best would be a concrete floored , well ventilated building with no possibility of water leaks or infiltration under the floor. A big part of the equation is the location, if the ambient humidity is always high you still have potential rust issues and if it is too hot and dry the rubber and soft trim pays the price. Pest control is also necessary but good luck finding the best method. If you cover the car make sure the cover is a breathable material that will not trap condensation moisture. One important thing that often does not happen is to regularly inspect the vehicle for problems and fix them before they become major.

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It seems no one has responded to the tarp question. I would heartily recommend a tarp under any vehicle parked on a) the ground itslef, or B) a concrete slab sitting in the ground. If you are parked on the 2d story or higher of a parking garage, it may not be much help. Otherwise, it does keep moisture from attacking the undercarriage.

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I assume that if the floor is treated with an epoxy coating that the moisture issue from the floor is eliminated?

I have a fully insulated garage (attached) and will be painting the floor with an epoxy coating. As for heating the garage...I was planning on heating when required (to about 10 c when I'm working on the car) but will the temperature fluctuations cause issues?

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I was planning on heating when required (to about 10 c when I'm working on the car) but will the temperature fluctuations cause issues?

If it causes the metal to sweat there will be damage. Dampness of any kind will cause unpleasant odors to form in stuffings and fabrics.

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I'm cheap, which is handy because I'm poor too, so I store my cars in a cold storage garage with a concrete floor. I do put a plastic tarp, actually nearly wall to wall, nder the cars.

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A lot of the older cars like my 1931 Dodge come with an instruction book which includes exactly how to store the car.

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Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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In-ground-heating-system

At work we just finished a new 40' x 80' building for display of our antique cars and trucks. At the time of construction, we installed plastic piping inside the cement as it was poured. A hot water heating system is pumped through these pipes during the winter, keeping the cars nice and warm and dry.

We are going to install an air conditioner soon, but for now are running a dehumidifier 24/7 with good results.

Prior to going high-tech, I always placed visqueen under my antique cars (wall to wall) to keep the undersides dry. You would be amazed at the amount of moisture that is collected under the visqueen. This keeps the exhaust system from drying out and protects the floor boards as well. I recommend this highly.

We also fitted all doors very tightly to keep out "critters" and will be placing bait here and there to be sure of no problems. Our windows are UV-protected to protect the rays of the sun from fading the vehicles.

We have a few more odds and ends to complete, but will soon have this building open to the public on Saturdays from 10 AM to 2 PM and also by chance on other days (except on Mondays and Holidays - closed Sundays). AACA members are always welcome.

Attached are some pictures of our new building, which is located at TP Tools, 7075 State Rt. 446, Canfield, OH 44406 (1 mile west of the center of Canfield on Rt. 224 at corner of State Rt. 446. Several more cars have been added since these pictures were taken.

Fred

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Edited by FRED Z
Typo error (see edit history)

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Unless you have a million to spend, avoid concrete floors. Opt for a tight wooden building at least a foot off the ground. It will "breathe", and natural air cuirculation will prevent condensation problems. And, real boards are better than plywood or chipboard.

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Putting a tarp OVER the car (as originally asked) is asking for major paint problems, even after a short period of time. Putting a car cover over a car parked outside (for a prolonged period of time) will trap moisture like you wouldn't believe. The easier it is for air to move, the better. Even when parked indoors, it is good to have a fan blowing to keep good circulation.

Fred. Beautiful garage!!!:)

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West,

You are indeed correct; the question was about "OVER." I, obviously misread it. In doing so I added a new, and I think interesting element to the discussion.

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For my 2cents woth, the best storage is the upper floor of an old industrial building. I stored my Chevy II for a number of years in the Packard plant, we had a room on the forth floor. The car did not age a day in a period of nine years.

Short of that, a building with a concerete floor is best, coat the bare concrete with something, I like epoxy paint, then install a small, cheap electric fan under one end of the car, set it on low speed and let it run continiously. Just keep the air under the car moving, not stagnant and moisture will not collect there. Also invest in an ultrasonic pest repeller, a small device you plug in and it ommits a very high frequency pitch inaudible to humans, but super annoying to mice and vermin.

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It's very important to prevent the condensation caused by rapid temperature changes from cold and dry to warm and moist. This is a common weather occurrence in New England, especially in the fall.

I've found a few lit incandescent light bulbs in a well sealed garage slows the change inside when the weather turns, causing the car to warm up gradually which greatly reduces the condensation.

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