Jump to content

The pluses and minuses of the Barn Find


Guest asinger

Recommended Posts

Guest asinger

Finding a car parked in a barn is like opening a time capsule. There's a car that's been in there, untouched, for 20, 30, sometimes even 50 years. On the outside, it might look pretty good. But once you dig deeper . . . .

That's when the trouble begins.

I know a lot of different folks have located their old cars in barns. I was wondering how they've fared with restorations with the kinds of problems that sitting in a barn for X number of years have caused.

My transmission guy told me that when a car has been parked in a barn, the dirt floor tends to dry out everything on the car.

In my own case, my 1967 Mercury Park Lane convertible sat uncovered in a barn for 20 years. The previous owner found it, bought it, painted it, did some "work" to the engine, then sold it. To me. Sometimes I think I'm an idiot.

The convertible top was completely gone. The previous owner removed its remnants with plans to replace it, but he never did. Some of the convertible crossbars (not sure what they're called) were completely rusted and only sandblasting and welding saved them.

The floorboards were all rusted out. The trunk shelf where the convertible folds down was one big piece of rust. I'm amazed the seats were still in good condition. And further amazingly, the trunk floor is fine.

All rubber had dried out: weatherstripping, bushings, even inside the transmission. Tranny required a complete rebuild. I replaced all weatherstripping. I'm on a quest now to replace every rubber bushing involved in the suspension, but current finances force me to now do only one purchase a month. (Last month it was battery and alternator.)

So, what about you guys?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the barn finds I have found are intact with very minor paint/rust issues. Most of the time a moist barn or a leaky roof over the vehicle will rust it out. Usually, the biggest problem is the rubber parts drying out and needing replacement and I have had little problem with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nightmare! Depends how they were stored, but, most everything will be dried out, etc. New belts hoses, rubber. RATS! Now, if they were in a garage they may be better. But, my '41 Dodge was in better shape than alot of barn finds, and it was outside!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pulled a 1940's, Buick, and a 1963ish Ford Galaxy out of a barn an number of years ago for a friend. Raccoons were living in the Buick Convertible. The only thing that saved the bottom half was that it was parked on wood. The Ford was on dirt, and the bottom half was rotted away, frame parts, fuel tank and other parts. Like the others have said, It would depend upon the barn. I have seen some really nice stuff come from the second level of an old barn with a good roof and good wood floor. :) Dandy Dave!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest richentee

Our AB sat on stands in its barn for 31 years in Southern California. Our '17 Franklin was only out of its California garage cocoon once in 40 years, enough time to sieze the engine. Both left storage with the same issues that put them into storage and off the road.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...