Jump to content

Engine timing and dwell adjustments for a '41


Paul K.
 Share

Recommended Posts

How is everyone adjusting timing and dwell? I have an earlier Technicial Service Bulletin manual from 1938-1940, I also have access to a distributor machine and a friend that knows how to use it. What about in the car adjustments. Do I need the "special cap" to install on the distributor mentioned in technical service bulletin OPR.12127-M page 64. April 15, 1938? Would a 6 volt timing light suffice? Very different design on these cars. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can measure the timing as illustrated ..1 hole vs another ..most motor manuals..

the best way / only real way , is to mount it on a "sun" or heyer machine...

You must synch the points like 2 engines on a boat....left and right sides of engine operate seperately..Call Jake Flemming in Tx. He can coach you...great friendly man

I tried 2 timing lights, one on each side to experiment..if u are tinkering..with it running , carefully and slowley turn the inner screw, on the side of dist. Main plate and screw, advance the hole plate, both sets of pts for timings...inner screw advances one set vs the other..very impt..

BE CAREFUL FAN WILL BITE YOU...

The big screw with vac line is vac advance system ..adjusted for "ping" on acceleration "fine tuning"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Paul

If your friend has the proper timing jig, and knows how to use it, you shouldn't have any problems setting the distributor up. The jig sets the timing at 4deg advance on the crankshaft.

Last year I found through experimenting, and having the distributor off many times that the engine runs much better and cooler on today's fuels if the timing is set to 6deg BTDC (3 deg on the jig). The fact that the engine runs cooler at this setting suggested to me that at the old setting of 4 deg the engine is actualy running retarded. I tried it at 7 deg, with not much improvement over the 6, so I am presently running at 6 1/2 deg, hope this is of some help.

Regards

Peter Smith UK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be aware that the '41 and newer distributors all have a higher maximum advance than the eariler '36 to '40 models. You may find that adjusting the vacuum brake will give you the advance you're looking for? You may want to discuss this with Jake. You can tell if you have this newer distributor by checking the number stamped on the drive key. The no. "16H xxxx" indicates it's the newer style. The range on the newer distributor is 2 to 25 deg's crankshaft. The earlier distributors were set at 4 deg's intial advance but had a little less range.

Edited by peecher (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a distributor machine and doing it the way the manual says with some machinist rulers comes out as good or better. Also when you mount the distributor the dwell can change up to 15 degrees if you over tighten the dist.

Once you get a dist. set up by someone with a machine recheck your dwell once its on and running to see if it changes.

I spent 3 days dialing in 2 distributors for my car so I knew they would be perfect if I ever had to swap them out while on the road.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking if old Allen Dist. machines check this one out from the San Diego Auto Museum. I must of not noticed it on my last trip to this museum. I was too fixated with the cars and motorcycles. Another amazing piece of automotive equipment to go with our LZs.

Quite a different design from the Suns and Heyers. I love the two industrial lights above the turntable.

post-42351-1431381005_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...