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Another Tire Question


Siegfried
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I've always used radial tires on my VW Bugs and Karmann Ghia. The Karmann Ghia is a HPOF certified very original 1963 coupe. It was purchased by the original owner, I'm owner number 2 since 1984, at the Karmann Coachworks, Osnabruck, Germany in June of 1963. All the original papers are in German, and I have translated them. I have an original document that shows that Michelin Z 155SR15's were mounted at the factory.

So now here is my question. I use 165SR15's on the Karmann and they are correct because 165's are the optional oversize tire to use in place of the rinky-dink 155's, and recently I was faced with replacing all four 165's thanks to my stupid mistake of letting the car sit to long under cover in my carport, and the tires dry rotted on the outer sidewalls thanks to weather extremes and Mr. Sunshine. Well, actually just 1 blew out, but why take a chance? So 4 it was.

My problem became the task of locating 4 165's at a reasonable cost. The best I got was a price of 125.00 apiece. This is what 2 Michelins used to cost, and these were some brand I've never heard of! So I passed and went with 165/80/15's at a saving of over 200.00 for all 4 and these were a name I recognized and trust. The 165/80's are almost identical to the 165SR's. They are not a stated 'P' series radial, and they are not a metric radial as are 165SR's.

So where am I in regards to breaking the tire rules at an AACA National Meet? Granted, I'm only HPOF and not Junior/Senior quality, but all the same I do like to try to stay accurate.

By the way, even though you can't see my battery, it has a factory cover over it, it is still a 6 volt with 3 caps.

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You should be fine. My Chevy II is pretty much orginal and it has had radials on it every time it has been in the HPOF class. So, as long as you aren't marginal on making the overall % (forgot the figure), you won't have a problem.

Just checked..65%

Edited by novaman (see edit history)
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No, paint is not a total HPOF disqualification if the car is not below some magical percentage point rating which I have no idea what that is, but that is what I was told a few years back. If I do do a body cleanup and new paint I will be using acyrlic enamel. I'm still back in the dark ages on paint, no basecoat/clearcoat paint jobs for me on antique cars.

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HPOF works basicaly like this:

they look at the four catagories of the vehicle. Engine, Chassis, Interior, Exterior. In each of those catergoies it is broken down kindof like the sheet for Jr but a little more general. so you get a score/percentage for that item/area Those are average out for a percentage score for that category. Then they take each of the four areas percentage then average them together for an overall score/percentage. If it makes 65% or higher then the car gets certified. So if nothing was touched in the engine, chassis, interior areas, and the outside was repainted, rechromed, that would be a 100%+100%+100%+0% divided by 4 = 75%

This is a little different than how I understood it was to be when the HPOF first started which was more like the car had to be something like 80% in any category then the car was certified in that catergory. The idea was that the car info would be on file at the library and if I was restoring a car like it and needed info then I could contact the library, they'd put me in touch with the owner of an HPOF car certified in that area of need.

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Thanks for the information. I know I should be paying closer attention especially since I am a judge.

My reason for a repaint is simple, the car is starting to look bad. When I do the repaint I'll be using the correct color and paint base. No basecoat/clearcoat.

I guess if I lose my HPOF status as a result, I;ll just show as DPC.

I am planning to do the repaint this winter so the Karmann Ghia looks very respectable for Louisville in 2010.

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S-I, I would think that whichever way your Ghia goes, HPOF or DPC, the library and research center would gratefully accept any photo documentation that you would be willing to share with others to help them restore their Ghia correctly. So even if you take photos and then restore/repaint/rechrome the area the photos are still available as to how it was new from the factory.

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You're probably correct Susan, and maybe I'll contact the library. I'm only 20 minutes away. The car is as close to original as you can get considering that it has had tires, brakes, etc replaced. Always used genuine German parts and since I'm a VW collector I have 100's of NOS items in storage.

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S-I, I am sure they would welcome your offer. And I know that others would as well.

We got a 1974 Mercedes Benz 450SL in May of last year. We know that items have been changed. We will need information at some point to get it back to where it should be. For now it could go DPC and be okay with some minor work.

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Susan, I guess I was lucky as the original owners never changed anything in 21 years. They even kept the European tail lights that were on the car when they bought it. They put on USA taillights after they shipped the car home. I was very lucky with my purchase.

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windjamer,

I don't know of any cars that come without a spare tire now. Every older car that I have experience with also came with a spare. If documentation shows that the car in question could be ordered without a spare tire, you should be OK. If, however, as I suspect, that the car originally came with a spare tire, and it is visible, a missing spare tire would cost you some points.

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MCHinson is correct. If a vehicle came with a spare tire then it would be required to have it. The owner would need documentation to show that the spare was an option if that be the case. This proves true mostly with some commercial vehicles which did not automatically come equipped with a spare. Passenger cars, excepting "some" of the very early ones, generally did come with a spare. Sometimes even two spares.

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That is correct. If it is visible without moving anything, it is judged. If there is a cover over it (from the factory), then only the condition of the cover matters. Nothing is removed by the judges to judge what is under it.

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