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"38 special (no go on the start)


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I guess you all know what a pleasure it is to be able to move the car on it's own and not have to push or pull with a car every time you need to move it, but let me tell you what a pleasure. I have the picture of the timing chain sitting on my desk top, if someone can tell me how to post it. Will also post a pic of the car.

thanks again, good to hear from you John.

Brian

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Hi Brian,

To upload photos you first have to post them online elsewhere. I copied posting instructions from the Auburn Cord Duesenberg site, with a few revisions. (Acknowlegdement to Bill Hummel of the ACD Club for these instructions)

First take a great picture of your car!

It should be reduced to 640x480 or 800x600 at the largest.

Put your photos in a file on your computer.

Here's how to post a picture on this website:

a) Create a FREE account at http://WWW.PHOTOBUCKET.COM for image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing.

B) Click on the Upload Photos box to post your pix to your page on PHOTOBUCKET, following photobucket's instructions (It's easy).

c) After the picture(s) you want is(are) uploaded, put your courser on the thumbnail photo--do NOT click. A window will drop down at the bottom of the thumbnail. Move your courser to the line that starts with "IMG." Then left-click once. It will highlight itself. Press CNTR-C to copy the highlighted address to your clipboard or buffer.

d) Go back to your Buick message board thread. Hit CNTR-V to copy the address into your text and posting. It will look like a web address: ...lotsofstuff...[img]  You can move thi

Repeat the process for each photo you wish to upload into the forum. When your posting is opened, your photo should be there.

If this is just too much to deal with, email the pix to me and I'll post them for you: thomasrparkinson@yahoo.com.

Here's an example I posted by following the above directions to be sure they worked. My '37 Roadmonster all gussied up for the kids' wedding.

%7Boption%7Dhttp://i595.photobucket.com/albums/tt36/trp3141592/BuickWeddingPhotoB.jpg' alt='BuickWeddingPhotoB.jpg'>

--Tom

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Edited by trp3141592 (see edit history)
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Very frustrated, took engine pipe out of muffler (it was clear) and reinstalled it on the manifold so the noise and exhaust would get away from the engine compt. but eventually the same symptoms occured. Ran for a few minutes then stalled and was very difficult to get started again. start and run and die/ After it died it was very hard to turn over like the battery was dying or the engine was tight. removed the engine pipe and everything seemed to be fine again. Also I have removed and replaced the gasket on the fuel pump base three times and it is still leaking from the bottom edge, what's up. Haven't had time to fool with photobucket but will try in the near future, beautiful car Tom. thanks Brian

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Hi Grant, yes it's leaking from the base and the block. Leaking oil that is. I have the oil level right and when I take the dipstick out it's not coming out there either so I know the crankcase is not pressurised like before all this work. Anyway I'm going to try a new gasket and some form a gasket or rtv on it and see if that works. I checked out the manifold and found the plate in the neck was turned sideways to block the exhaust and I was able to push it straight up and down so there is no backpressure on the head.Seems to have solved my problem with the exhaust pipe. Car starts and runs now with the engine pipe on. I will coninue to work my way towards the back and make sure the muffler is clear and then the tailpipe. That plate is part of the heating cycle for cold weather starts I guess and i certainly don't need it here in Carolina much. maybe I'll leave it in the straight up and down position were it's not restricting the flow and be done with it for now.

thanks Brian

Edited by captbrian38 (see edit history)
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BTW Tom I tried that email address and it came back as undeliverable. I tried to send you pics but wasn't able to because of the address. If you have another or check that one and I'll resend them.

thanks,

Brian

Tom

just checked the address and I missed the r, sorry. i resent them on email.

Edited by captbrian38 (see edit history)
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Hi. Brian, I got your email and pix, which I am posting below. Those who have been following this thread can count the chain pins for themselves, as I have. I would have bet the farm that the chain was mis-installed, but clearly it is OK.

buicktimingchainSmall.jpg

Brian's 38 Buick timing chain.

buickawaitingengine.jpg

A sweet looking rebuild ready to drop back into the '38.

--Tom

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Edited by trp3141592 (see edit history)
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thanks for the help Tom, it really is a nice rebuild. had it running and out for a short ride today and it is running so I guess it was the heat riser that was stuck closed after all. I'm going to put new exhaust on eventually.

I'll try the photobucket deal another time.

Brian

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OK now I'm overheating and I have new stuff. Block boiled out at the rebuild, new water pump, no thermostat and no waterpump relief valve and the radiator has good flow when I backed flushed it to clean it. Doesn't seem to be any flow when I look in the fill at the radiator with engine runnig. I'm wondering if there is short circuiting going on but the lower hose is as hot as the top hose and I'm getting good air flow through the radiator so what's up. Can any one help with this one. Engine runs great though and I shut it down when I can't hold my hand on the upper hose.

thanks Brian

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You need that bypass valve installed! I am fairly certain its job is to allow flow through the block when the thermostat is closed. When the thermostat is open, it closes to force flow through the radiator.

Jeff

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yes it's leaking from the base and the block.

Brian--the gasket at your fuel pump has to be installed with gasket sealant. I use and highly recommend the black gooey Permatex #2-style glop--available in your local parts store for about $4.00 for a lifetime supply 3-oz tube. #2 cement never quite sets up hard, and it makes an aggressive and effective seal. Apply to both surfaces and to both sides of the gasket. You WILL get it on your fingers, clothing, etc. Re-tighten the attaching bolts a couple days after installation.

I have seen several failures of RTV gasket all-in-one applications. Go with the #2 Permatex product with a new gasket.

2gasketcement.jpg

--Tom

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Edited by trp3141592 (see edit history)
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Hi Tom, that's what I did, made a full face gasket and used the blue gasket sealer on both sides and the leak is fixed, thanks.

Jeff, I bought a meat thermometer that goes up to 220 degs. and inserted in the fill and saw that what I thought was hot, hot was 180 after a short run and idling for about 15 minutes. I'm running with no thermostat right now and I will have to fabricate some sort of relief valve as the old one is not there, removed at some earlier date. I think that might be a little hot for an open system but I will play with it for a while and see. I think like you said if the relief valve was in place it would foce water through the block more efficiently.

next on the agenda is putting the gas tank back in. I've blown out the fuel line and then I can run like a normal human being and not with a tank hanging from a stick across the hood.

thanks of both of you, Brian

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180 isn't bad. What was the air temp on the day of your short run? If you were up in the 80's, then 180 may be about right. On the other hand, if it were a 60 degree day...

To fabricate a diverter, try a bolt with a nut and a washer (use all stainless steel and Loctite). The washer doesn't have to be a close fit in the throat of the casting, since the production part doesn't fit too close either. Just close enough to offer resistance to flow through the bypass, so that 95% of the flow goes through the radiator. Without a restriction, you may be at about 50% recirc, and 50% through the radiator.

The production one is designed with a long brass shaft (bolt in your case) that has a spring to return it to the closed position. When the thermostat is closed, the pump flow pushes open the bypass, allowing flow through the block.

You could make yours fixed, in the closed position, and never use a thermostat.

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Hi Jeff, thanks for the info, it was in the 80's here in eastern NC yesterday so I'm guessing that 180 is pretty good like you said. I have to retorque the head at some point and when I pull the rocker arm off I'll attend to bypass system. thanks for the help. Will keep everyone informed as to the progress. Like I said next on the agenda is the gas tank. I think NC DOT would rather not see the bottle hanging with gas hooked to the fuel pump.

Brian

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  • 1 month later...

Hi to all who followed this thread from the beginning want to update you as to the progress. Car is back together and driveable and registered. Last to do is install the hood. Runs at about 170 degs. with a 160 thermostat at idle in 80deg. temps and drops to about 155 when running. Have a leak at the rear seal of the trans which I will have to attend to before any long trips but everything else seems to be fine. Will try to get a pic posted in the near future. It's a strong runner and yes when better cars were built Buick built straight eights.

captbrian38

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