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Not just a judging issue. The Hershey Region is talking ...


Siegfried
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We own two Golden Retreivers (both rescues) and would NEVER take them out to a car show. Everyone as already addressed the issues of potential damage to vehicles or a dog biting, but I don't think anyone has mentioned the impact on the dog. I have been to many car shows where dogs were present (last night and today as a matter of fact). Most of the dogs were pretty well behaved. No accidents. But what did I notice that is very prevalent in situations like this?

The morons that bring their dogs don't bother to bring any water for the poor animal! I have been to many show in 90+ degree weather and seen people dragging their poor dog around, looking like it was going to drop dead from the heat. NONE OF THEM have any water for the dog.

I can't tolerate several hours at a car show in the middle of summer any more. What do people think it would be like if they had to wear a fur coat at the same time? Yes, the fur acts as insulation in summer and winter, but the only way a dog sweats is by panting and these dogs are going a mile a minute.

Even if people have no consideration for their fellow human beings, they should at least have some consideration for their pets.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The morons that bring their dogs don't bother to bring any water for the poor animal! I have been to many show in 90+ degree weather and seen people dragging their poor dog around, looking like it was going to drop dead from the heat. NONE OF THEM have any water for the dog. </div></div>

Ditto.

I've seen hundreds of pet owners at car shows I wanted to report for animal cruelty for doing exactly this. Hershey tends to slightly cooler weather, but even then it's just too much for most dogs to deal with.

And don't even get me started on people pulling babies and toddlers around in hot metal wagons or bouncing them to death in umbrella strollers at car shows. I've had to restrain myself several times from just going off on some clown with a passed out or screaming beet-red kid frying in the sun. mad.gifmad.gifmad.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> What's next - hang gliders?</div></div>

YO! YO! YO!... I've been hang gliding for 29 years, and I've landed on a few things I didn't want to, but a car show was never one of them.........Bob

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Hello eveybody. Thanks for chiming in on the Doggie issue. I like dogs which is amazing because at the ripe old age of 6 I was bitten in the left hand by our landlords collie. It seemed Mr. Collie though that I was fair game because I was dressed up in my Roy Rodgers cowboy clothes, and Mr. Collie had been getting terrorized by the landlords son and his motorcycle cronies. They usually dressed like 'Rebels Without A cause', and this being 1955. Well, you can imagine, along comes another customed goof, and the doggie got some pay back. Unfortunately the pay back went to me. Anyhow, the teeth went in from the bottom and came out the top, and vice-versa. To this day my left hand is nowhere near as good as my right hand. Amazingly it does work pretty well most of the time, and there was no major nerve, or muscle damage that did not heal .

I am truly afraid that some unsuspecting child, or adult will encounter a dog who is deceptively friendly, like Mr. Collie was, until the hand get extended for the pat, and zappo the hand gets chomped!!

Please let national AACA hear from you all, and let Hershey Region hear also. Several of us voiced objection at Hershey Region, and we were ignored. The decision had been made and that was that.

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Hang gliding? Whats it like? Is it anywhere near as superb as jumping out of a perfectly good airplane and then waiting til the 400 foot mark to pull the cord? I had to quit jumping at 57. Getting too old they said. So if hang gliding is as good, or better, where do I sign up.

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Most of the dogs that I have seen at Hershey, other than the ones that belong to vendors, would rather be anywhere else. Pavement is hot on paws and the radiating heat has them panting in no time. If they left their dogs on hot pavement where they live the local ASPCA would come and take the dog to a shelter and the owner to jail.

And you are correct about many kids frying in the wagons and strollers. God bless the parents that construct cover over them.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave Fields</div><div class="ubbcode-body">AS you sit in your car or a folding chair at a car show, you can see the barbarians arive. First come the bicycles, going up and down the isles, then it is the women with monstrosities of baby carriages (how do they fit them in modern cars) being shoved everywhere. Then the skateboarders come flying in. And now the dog owners! What's next - hang gliders? </div></div>

Even other car owners can be a problem. As a Team Captain at Gettysburg I had to politely ask one car owner to please not lean on the fender of the car next to his. Go figure!

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Good comments on the young kids in the strollers. Hot weather is really rough on them as is hours riding around in a stroller.

By the way, for years I had a spot on the old White Field, and my neighbors from New Jersey always brough Decker, their cocker spaniel along for Hershey. Decker was super. Really loved to bark at butterflys. I never said a word, I was a bad boy Hershey Region member.

The point is, a well behaved dog, and an owner with common sense are not the problem with dogs at Hershey. The problem is really the folks that take there doggie along for the stroll through the flea market, car show, etc. Imagine how spooked you might be if suddenly you were confronted by hordes of people you've never seen before, and here you are on a leash. And lets not forget the pottie issue. When a dog has to go he goes, and thats all there is to that. Sure some owners will clean up after doggie, but what happens when doggie does a number 1 on someones parts, or car? Tough to clean up liquid unless you've got a towel and some wated to wash it off with. Don't imagine too many doggie owners carry a bottle of water and towels.

Well, enough from me, or maybe too much from me. Just trying to express a few concerns.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bill_Haegele</div><div class="ubbcode-body">We own two Golden Retreivers (both rescues) and would NEVER take them out to a car show. Everyone as already addressed the issues of potential damage to vehicles or a dog biting, but I don't think anyone has mentioned the impact on the dog. I have been to many car shows where dogs were present (last night and today as a matter of fact). Most of the dogs were pretty well behaved. No accidents. But what did I notice that is very prevalent in situations like this?

Even if people have no consideration for their fellow human beings, they should at least have some consideration for their pets. </div></div>

Bill - I have witnessed first hand how some dog owners have treated their pets at car shows. It amazes me how these people will bring their pets to a show that they KNOW have LARGE crowds. Then the poor animals get stepped on or tripped over because spectators are not paying attention or simply cannot see the dog. I have been at car shows where these so called "animal lovers" locked their pets in their vehicles on 90+ degree days. In one case the dog had to be rescued from the car (ie window smashed) because the owner could not be found. That owner got in a whole LOT of trouble. Unfortunately, in recent years the number of dogs at car shows is increasing. Also, unfotunately, it appears that the number of uncareing, cruel, owners is increasing as well.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: windjamer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The members are talking Hershey <span style="font-weight: bold">Region and AACA National</span>,are you paying attention?? </div></div>

Fixed that for you windjamer...

Just wondering has anyone here been to Hershey Park lately?

Do they allow dogs INSIDE the PARK itself? What about allowing them near the attractions or near/on the rides? If not, then how does HERCO explain that yet allowing dogs at events on other parts of their grounds?

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> if hang gliding is as good, or better, where do I sign up.</div></div>

Harrisburg is right in the middle of some good hang gliding sites. I started when was 40, 57 is doable assuming you are in halfway decent shape. If you want to know more PM me...Bob

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Actually, I don't think dogs have ever been permitted on the property. I believe there is signage as well. One year I had walked down the hill from my parent's house with my dog...just to go into the swap to get food. I was stopped by security as I attempted to enter. I think it is a lack of enforcement...as with all the other "no-no's" (bikes, mopeds, unofficial golf carts etc...etc)

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OK, I am confused…

Semi-Intelligent tells us that, “Hershey Region has decided that dogs are allowed starting in 2009. As a region member, and NOT a dog hater, I am worried about how this is going to work out.”

Nearchocolatetown tells us, “This shows JUST how much you people pay attension. Dogs have been allowed at Hershey because HERCO owns the property and Hershey region doesn't make the rules. This is NOTHING new.”

Stonefish now tells us, “Actually, I don't think dogs have ever been permitted on the property. I believe there is signage as well. One year I had walked down the hill from my parent's house with my dog...just to go into the swap to get food. I was stopped by security as I attempted to enter. I think it is a lack of enforcement...as with all the other "no-no's" (bikes, mopeds, unofficial golf carts etc...etc)”

I don’t intend to take a dog to Hershey. I do think that instead of trading barbs back and forth, it would be nice if we could get a factual report on the subject from those in charge of Hershey Region.

Any chance that Steve or someone else from National can get the facts out and resolve these questions?

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bob Giles</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Everybody has to have a cause. Gettysburg had a "pet friendly" hotel policy. I paid the $20 sur charge and had a good time with both pet and car. With the leash laws that are already on the books, I think the libility is covered. As for not cleaning up any pet messes, there are some people that shouldn't have pets or cars for that matter. Don't let one bad apple ruin a good time.

Now for my cause.

I fear that the AACA could be on the losing side with letting handi-cap people run all over the field. Gettysburg was one such example. Myself and two other men had to rescue a man that was on oxygen that was stuck in the mud with his handi-cap scooter. Other show fields like Hershey are too rough for any handi-cap vehicle.

The only point I'm trying to make here is we don't live in a perfect world. Lets just make the best of it and have a good time. </div></div>

Bob,

was that you? I helped that person out who was stuck in the mud behind where the firetrucks were. There was also some other younger person who was helping me too.

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Hey, I wouldn't mind getting some money out of the deal should a dog bite me. Granted, might be a painful and lengthy process but I would end up with enough money that I could by that Daytona or Superbird that I have always wanted!

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Interesting. I attended a small, local car show last Saturday put on by the local Cadillac Club to benefit... a Service Dog organization. There were about 60 cars in attendance including my '50 Packard. People, cars and dogs all got along just fine. The Service Dogs were the best behaved of the bunch; they didn't lean on my car, put their shoe on the bumper, or scratch the fenders with their belt buckle while peering at the straight 8 under the hood. It was a fun show.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> ....a Service Dog organization...</div></div>

JD brings up a point that we all are aware of.......pets need training..........as do some pet owners!!!! wink.gif

Wayne

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I agree that service dogs should be present and allowed since they have a purpose to assist the handicapped person. Regular dogs should be left home or in the RV or trailer where they can be left alone by the owner. Pets should not be allowed at any car show for liability and damage reasons. I own a dog and am well aware that even though it is a domesticated animal, they still can exhibit wild like tendencies. I have witnessed that first hand with my dog and my 2 yr old daughter.

Please do everyone a favor and take a pro-active measurement to prevent any instances or bad rep the AACA or anyone else may receive from this.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: R W Burgess</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> ....a Service Dog organization...</div></div>

JD brings up a point that we all are aware of.......pets need training..........as do some pet owners!!!! wink.gif

Wayne</div></div> Yes, Wayne....it is up to the OWNERS of the pets and the PARENTS of the children to train them correctly and until they do that...leave them at home. There is a reason some animals eat their young. It's easier than training them to respect others' property. I have even seen some parents with such lack of their own training that they will open car doors and sit in a show car without any idea whatsoever that it is NOT the thing to do. Their children learn from that.

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The gentleman we helped was on the lower level. There must have been more that one scooter stuck. I other people in my group helped me. The only point I was trying to make is their are many diferent people trying to enjoy this hobby.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JD in KC</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> The Service Dogs were the best behaved of the bunch; they didn't lean on my car, put their shoe on the bumper, or scratch the fenders with their belt buckle while peering at the straight 8 under the hood. It was a fun show. </div></div>

I know that you are being humorous with this statement. laugh.gif But most people probably don't know how many hundreds of hours of training guide/assistance dogs get starting at about two or three months old until they are placed with their new owners.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Steve Moskowitz</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The long story short is that dogs are allowed AS LONG AS THEY ARE ON A LEASH. Security has been notified, etc. That is the official explanation of the region. </div></div>

I'd suggest, if hasn't been done already, that the length of the leash be specified. A lot of owners like to use 30'+ retractable leashes that essentially aren't leashes. In those cases the excessive length of the strap or cable becomes another hazard.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave@Moon</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Steve Moskowitz</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The long story short is that dogs are allowed AS LONG AS THEY ARE ON A LEASH. Security has been notified, etc. That is the official explanation of the region. </div></div>

I'd suggest, if hasn't been done already, that they length of the leash be specified. A lot of owners like to use 30'+ retractable leashes that essentially aren't leashes. In those cases the excessive length of the strap or cable becomes another hazard.</div></div>

YES!!!! I agree. I can't stand those long "leashes". The owner can sit or stand in one spot and the leash gets tangled up in everyone. We have some folks in our club who bring their dog everywhere and we are always having to untangle ourselves from their leash. How unnerving in the middle of a club meeting.

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Last year in Cumberland, someone's dog wrapped its' metal leash around the front of Charlie Pergl's '56 Chevy. To say that Charlie was <span style="font-weight: bold">IRATE</span> would be putting it mildly. I just happened to witness a heated exchange between him and the Chief Judge (Dave Berg). I was glad that I wasn't in Dave's shoes that morning. Charlie was <span style="font-weight: bold">HOT</span>. If you've ever seen Charlie's cars, you'd fully understand why. mad.gifmad.gifmad.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave@Moon</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'd suggest, if hasn't been done already, that the length of the leash be specified. A lot of owners like to use 30'+ retractable leashes that essentially aren't leashes. In those cases the excessive length of the strap or cable becomes another hazard. </div></div>

Just tonight I had to remind Bill to not get between me and Haylee while she was on her Flexi-Leash. He was playing with her and she started to run around him. Trust me, a 45 lb. Dalmatian is a strong dog and she can take someone right off of their feet if she catches them with that leash. And it is a strong nylon cord, it is not going to break.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: keiser31</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> YES!!!! I agree. I can't stand those long "leashes". </div></div>

Used correctly they are fine. I have two of them that I use with Haylee, my Dalmatian. One is all webbing and one has the shorter strap and then the nylon line. I only use them for potty breaks for her. She likes to walk back and forth to find the perfect spot.

But when she goes out in public she has her choke chain collar on and her six foot leather leash. She is obedience trained and that collar and leash are like her "work clothes". She knows how she is expected to behave when they are used. Just as a guide dog for a blind person knows that when that harness goes on it is all business.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bill_Haegele</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Please resize your picture. It is HUGE and causes everything to require scrolling left/right and up/down.

Something like this:

</div></div>

A few days ago I asked Peter G. what the best size was to post photos to get a good photo but not expand the thread. He said it should be under 700 pixels wide. I found that 600 pixels wide doesn't expand it at all but the quality is good.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Shop Rat</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bill_Haegele</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Please resize your picture. It is HUGE and causes everything to require scrolling left/right and up/down.

Something like this:

</div></div>

A few days ago I asked Peter G. what the best size was to post photos to get a good photo but not expand the thread. He said it should be under 700 pixels wide. I found that 600 pixels wide doesn't expand it at all but the quality is good. </div></div>

The one I posted is 720x540 pixels.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Packin31</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sorry about that. I forgot about the picture size limits. I just removed my post to fix it. </div></div>

That wasn't necessary. If you didn't know how to resize the photo, you could have right clicked on the one I posted and done a "save as." Then you could have linked to the smaller photo. I really didn't mean for you to delete it.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Shop Rat</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: keiser31</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> YES!!!! I agree. I can't stand those long "leashes". </div></div>

Used correctly they are fine. I have two of them that I use with Haylee, my Dalmatian. One is all webbing and one has the shorter strap and then the nylon line. I only use them for potty breaks for her. She likes to walk back and forth to find the perfect spot.

But when she goes out in public she has her choke chain collar on and her six foot leather leash. She is obedience trained and that collar and leash are like her "work clothes". She knows how she is expected to behave when they are used. Just as a guide dog for a blind person knows that when that harness goes on it is all business.</div></div>

Yes...used correctly, they are fine. I believe that you are a good dog owner by the sounds of it.

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