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History of the Automotive Air Conditioner


Guest Paul Christ

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Guest Paul Christ

This was sent to me in an email;

<span style="font-style: italic">The four Goldberg brothers, Lowell, Norman, Hiram, and Max,

invented and developed the first automobile air-conditioner. On July

17, 1946, the temperature in Detroit was 97 degrees.

The four brothers walked into old man Henry Ford's office and

sweet-talked his secretary into telling him that four gentlemen were

there with the most exciting innovation in the auto industry since

the electric starter.

Henry was curious and invited them into his office. They refused and

instead asked that he come out to the parking lot to their car.

They persuaded him to get into the car, which was about 130 degrees,

turned on the air conditioner, and cooled the car off immediately.

The old man got very excited and invited them back to the office,

where he offered them $3 million for the patent.

The brothers refused, saying they would settle for $2 million, but

they wanted the recognition by having a label, 'The Goldberg

Air-Conditioner,' on the dashboard of each car in which it was

installed.

Now old man Ford was more than just a little anti-Semitic, and there

was no way he was going to put the Goldberg's name on two million Fords.

They haggled back and forth for about two hours, and finally agreed

on $4 million and that just their first names would be shown.

And so to this day, all Ford air conditioners show Lo, Norm, Hi, and

Max on the controls.

So, now you know the rest of the story.... </span>

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Guest 1928Packard526

huptoy —

The story at the head of this thread is pure fiction, of course, but there will be some that take it as true.

Packard was the first production car with A/C, but auto A/C was around at least 7 years earlier. According to some sources Studebaker beat Packard by a model year but I can't confirm that. Check out the piece in the Nov. '33 issue of Popular Science that appears below for a real pioneer. The conversion shown must have either had problems or been too expensive to catch on in the depression years.

If you look closely at the pictures the installation has all the elements of a modern system and appears to use a rather large DC motor for power.

Pete P.

post-50405-143138080954_thumb.jpg

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Guest Siegfried

Darn, I almost fell for it until I read the next to last sentence about the names. Bummer! But, what a GREAT imagination to come up with this story. Hope you don't mind, but I think I'll use to hoodwink the wife and kids. They're almost a gullible as me...

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Guest Orphanauto

Packard is considered to be the one that was 1st. Some say 1939, but that was becuase it came out in late 39, but on the 1940 models, it was called "Mechanical refrigeration". for $200.00 you could have it, very pricey then, so few cars had it. I wish my 40 had it.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: trimacar</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Speaking of gullible, you know, of course, that there's no such word as "gullible," it's a made up word. Go to the dictionary and try to look it up......... </div></div>

laugh.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Orphanauto</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Packard is considered to be the one that was 1st. Some say 1939, but that was becuase it came out in late 39, but on the 1940 models, it was called "Mechanical refrigeration". for $200.00 you could have it, very pricey then, so few cars had it. I wish my 40 had it. </div></div>

Actually, more than twice that price when first introduced. I believe they dropped the price of the option mid-year, but I don't think I've ever seen information where they dropped it as low as $200.

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