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To lubricate the front ball and trunion type universal joint on a 56 Chrysler "universal joint grease" is called for. Anyone have a clue what that might be? It looks thinner than grease but thicker than oil........Bob

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Guest simplyconnected

Sure! Buy a tube of moly grease in any major brand (like Mobil). When you put it between your fingers and pull them apart, it strings to a tiny thread. That indicates how well it hangs on, and lubricates. I use it for packing wheel bearings and tie rod ends, too.

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A guy on the Mopar forum says CV joint grease is the same as U.J.G. I suspect he's correct since a cv joint is basicly the same as the Chrysler trunnion joint.

I also just learned that grease is graded for viscosity much like oil and goes from 0 (brown mustard) to 3 (vegtable shortening). Most chassis gease seems to rated 2 (peanut butter). I learn something new every day...........Bob

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Guest simplyconnected

Funny you should mention peanut butter. At Ford, our high-temperature grease for huge electric motors looked exactly like peanut butter. It's not suitable for car components.

Every moly grease I have seen is blue-ish or green in color and nearly translucent. The colors are mostly manufacturer identifiers (same as gasoline). Grease viscosity for wheel bearing or tie rod ends is secondary to properties of wicking, or how well it hangs-on. Let's face it, all the grease in the world doesn't do much good if it remains a hard blob stagnating in a corner and away from friction points.

Truth is, I unscrewed the covers off my angle grinders (and big drill motor), and used moly grease in the gearboxes. I notice a BIG difference in friction, speed, sound, etc. It's the best I've seen in a very long time.

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I have a 5 gal bucket of extreme pressure moly additive grease that's used on drag lines in the strip mines. I would have used it for the universal but it's pretty thick.

The universal grease needs to be fairly loose since it depends on the grease flowing into the balls and trunion rather than being held in the joint.

I did pick up a packet of CV joint grease today. It looks very similar to the original and by it's color I'd say it has a molybdenum disulfide additive but it had no information other than it was for CV joints. We hope for the best.......Bob

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Guest simplyconnected

<--not familiar with 'extreme pressure' grease. Maybe that's why it's so thick, Bob.

The stuff I get in a grease gun tube is thin, but too thick to pour. We get it in 55-gal drums at Ford for production. They use on front wheel bearings (before the spindles are pressed together on Mustangs).

The CV grease I've worked with comes in individual pre-measured packets. If I remember right, it pours out. But hey, as long as it doesn't run out, I can't argue with success. Glad you found what you're looking for.

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Near as I can tell EP grease is formulated to withstand very heavy pressure and shear force at lower speeds rather than lighter high speed loads. A lot of the EP grease seems to be lithium based with Moly and/or graphite additives.

I imagine EP works well in things like track rollers, open gears, mining equiptment and other things that are under heavy slower loads. My pail was liberated from a strip mining operation.......Bob

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Guest simplyconnected

Bob, I found a couple things about Extreme Pressure Grease:

* CITGO Petroleum Corp. offers OverDrive HD, a grease for extreme pressure, wear protection, and protection from metal-to-metal friction. It eases the extreme torque and loading placed on spring pins, U-joints and other critical chassis parts. In addition, it stays put in spring and shackle pins, fifth wheels, king pins etc.

The grease is formulated with a proprietary lithium complex thickener that is compatible with many other types of greases..."

* "It is formulated to provide for easy penetration lubrication of the inner-most wire rope strands, chains and machinery. The Thick High Pressure Grease dries to a firm chemical and abrasive resistant film whilst remaining as a mobile lubricant on contact parts temperature range: minus 40 degree Centigrade to 100 degree Centigrade.

Thick High Pressure Grease resists salt spray and sea water immersion. The addition of metallic boundary lubricants, molybdenum disulphide and graphite ensures that ropes and machinery life is considerably extended. This High Pressure Grease is used on cranes, draglines, excavators, offshore drilling rings and any heavy duty lifting and haulage gear. It is useful for gears, rotor, pinions, inner wire strands, etc, exposed to corrosive atmospheres, weather or salty atmosphere."

It doesn't sound like something I would use in a automotive U-joint. - Dave

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest SwiftBuicks

Well, I'm a bit of a greaser. Right now, though, I want to know what the best CV Jt. grease should be.

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