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29 CHRYSLER RUNNING HOT


mikzjr@aol.com
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I HAVE A 29 CHRYSLER MODEL 75 SILVER DOME FIRST TIME OUT THIS SPRING, TEMP. GETS UP TO 200 IN ABOUT 3 MILES, RUNS GREAT JUST TEMP CLIMBS I DID PUT 87 OCTANE IN THE CAR TODAY COULD THAT MAKE IT RUN TO LEAN AND HEAT UP.ALSO THIS WINTER I PAINTED THE RADIATOR WITH EMRON COULD IT NOT BE THE PROBLEM.

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painting a radiator will definetly hinder the heat transfer of the coolant. If nothing has changed since last year ie: timing, then I would look at the radiator. Try back flushing it to get better flow and make sure the thermostat isn't stuck closed. Can you see any coolant flowing through the upper neck?

Dan

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A good way to check for radiator internal blockage is to remove the bottom hose then put a cap of some sort over the lower outlet again and fill the radiator. Once filled remove the cap from the lower outlet and observe how the escaping water flows, if it glug,glug,glugs then this would indicate an internal blockage, if it flows freely with a rush then the radiator is clear.

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Thats for the input, but I think I can rule out the radiator being blocked, it was repaired last year had a leak around a stud for the shutter, it was cooked and tested at that time,could be the water pump it was rebuilt in 1989. As for the 87 octane I normally run high test do you think it could have it running to lean? I drove the car in January it was a 45-50 degree day put fifty miles on it non-stop didn't over heat.

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I do know that todays fuel is absolutely horrible for our cars. I have a 69 Charger and have noticed significantly over the past couple of years since they have started using more ethanol in the gas, the temps have been going up. I also noticed that the lower octane that I run, the higher the temps got as well. From now on, I run 93 or higher and add octane booster.

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I've had some experience that might help you out. We restored a '29 DeSoto roadster when I was a kid, with the 6-cylinder Silver Dome engine, which was probably a bit smaller than the engine on your car. Following restoration, the car tended to run hot despite a cleaned-out radiator and engine block. We ultimately determined that the water was passing through the radiator too fast. A round block of wood in the radiator hose, with a half-inch hole drilled in the center, solved the problem. I don't remember if there was a place to install a thermostat, but perhaps that would have helped just as much. When you did your work several months ago, was there a thermostat present that perhaps you did not reinstall? Also, be sure to check your ignition timing and points settings, as these were contributing factors on our car -- but not as much as the rapid water circulation. My own opinion is that the radiator paint you added is not a factor, provided that you did not stack it on too thick. I've painted a number of radiators, but always try to keep it really thin.

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Thanks for the input guys I just got done looking for the problem timing is good, the car has dual points I noticed that one set of points, the end that slides over the stud and strikes the distrutor cam was up on a angle, which only allowed that set of points to half make they wouldn't strike true, the car is idling alot better as for the heating up didn't get a chance to drive it let it idle a good hour and temp never got over 160 which it did before. Should there be a clip to hold them down on the stud don't remember one being on them, but there is a notch in the stud to accept a clip.

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Now that you mention ignition problems contributing to overheating, it reminds me that some years back a fully restored 64 Lincoln we have starting running hot for no apparent reason. I could not find anything wrong. Finally, one day it stalled and could not be restarted. The coil had burned out. After I replaced the coil, the overheating problem disappeared as well.

On the '29 DeSoto, the plastic bumper on the points worn down, narrowing the gap. That's why you have to put a small dab of grease on the distributor cam.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just to add a quote from my 1931 Dodge DH6 Instruction book...."Lead and oil paint should never be put on the radiator core because it forms an insulation that retards dissipation of heat".

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