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jeff_a

Peerless Research Findings

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57. There is a 1912 Peerless Limousine, Model 48-Six ( also referred to as a Model 36 ), in the collection of the Western Development Museum, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Car reported to have only about 100 mi. on odometer!

 

58. An outstanding color photograph of the above car is now on wikipedia.org under "Peerless". This was the second limo owned by the Lougheed family of Cochrane, Alberta: the Lougheeds also owned a 1910 Peerless Limousine.

 

59. In 1904, Fred Vogler of Red Rock, MT drove his 1904 4-cylinder Peerless over the same pass Lewis & Clark used to cross the Continental Divide in 1805.

 

60. By 1904, Peerless was testing all cars for power output with an electric dynamometer...something that was almost unheard of at the time. A factory test track was also in place.

 

61. 1905 model Peerlesses had overhead valve engines.

 

62. Re: PRF # 31. I just saw the film "Looking for Miracles". There is one scene showing a green Model 8-125 7-Pass. Sedan owned at the time by Charles Brown of Ontario, Canada. A truly opulent Classic Car, in my opinion.

 

63. Looking at the September issue of Hemmings Classic Car, pg 13, I noticed an ad for The Glenmoor Gathering that appears to have the V-16 Peerless from the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum pictured.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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I don't believe any Peerless body would fit on a Model T Ford. There were several companies that made body's and parts for the T. You could take an older T and buy all the parts to make it a speedster. There was a company that made a radiator shell for the T and it had Peerless stamped on it. Many people confused this and said it was for a Peerless car or if it was on a model T they would think it a Peerless body. Peerless is a generic name and was and still is used on many products.

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Dave,

Good point. I had never thought of it being one of the speedster bodies made to replace the Model T bodies.

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I thought I would write something just to keep this forum going.

Don Bettes, our Peerless Club V. Pres. has obtained three spaces at the Hershey swap meet this year for Peerless. We will have a club display and also vending some Peerless parts. If you are in the area stop in and see us.

We just got back from the Milwaukee Masterpiece car show with our 1909 Mason. We changed the body from a truck to touring for a demonstration. The Mason was built by the Duesenberg brothers in Des Moines. Next week we are taking it to Auburn and will be on display at the ACD museum. It is the only two-in-one and we will be demostrating the body change there. We might even be on the speed channel.

We will have to get Jeff out here so he can take a cruise in a Peerless.

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I wish that I could make it, but I am unable to do so. Even though it is long hhours a a lot of work, I know that you guys have a ball at these shows. I have a 1908 Mason Runabout and a 1909 Mason delivery van shown on my 1908 gallery pages. It took hours of searching to find them. Take care and thanks for writing. If you want to see who I am, go to my "about us "page on my website. Sincerely, Royal

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64. I saw an ad for two demonstrator cars for sale in a 9-14-1904 Horseless Age : "1904 Four Cylinder Peerless. They are the regular 24 H.P. $4,000 models of 1904 with Quinby bodies." --Frank D. Illsey, Chicago, auto broker 

 

65. The manual I have for a Peerless 6-72 says that a Briggs & Stratton transmission lock is fitted at the base of the gearshift. Oddly enough, the 6-70 (nearly identical model) I saw in June has a moveable plate covering its lock that says "Yale".

 

66. A new book has a photo of a Peerless being driven from Red Rock, MT to Salmon, ID in 1904: Beaverhead County by Stephen C. Morehouse and the Beaverhead County Museum, Arcadia Publ., 2008, pp 60-61.

 

67. The car in the above entry was owned by F.W. Vogler, had 3 passengers, and was a 24 h.p. Model 9 touring car.

 

68. Any business majors reading this? This could be of interest: Burrell, O.K., "The Amazing Transformation of the Peerless Motor Car Corporation" in Selections from Oregon Business Review 1941-1961, pg 107, 1963.

 

69. The Peerless Motor Car Corporation's annual production averaged 3,847, according to the Standard Catalog's figures. I'm not sure if this is just cars, or includes trucks and other commercial yehicles.

 

70. According to WIKIPEDIA'S "List of automotive superlatives", Peerless was the first car with "standard electrical lights" in 1908.

Edited by jeff_a
date (see edit history)

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Thanks for your letter. Biddle and Smart of Amesbury was conracted to make limousine bodies. Throughout their years of manufacturing, their primary work was for five to seven passenger vehicles. As you well know, no one body company was able to meet the demands of the automobile company, so several body building companies were used. Quinby bodies were also of the highest caliber and Peerless would certainly use them. If only the automobile companies had given credit to the body builders and had taged them, how much more we could know today. In the latter part of production, Hudson finally gave Biddle and Smart credit for their bodies.

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Green Dragon,

That's great that there will be a Peerless Club booth at the AACA National Meet in Hershey next month! Wish I could make it. I'm sure you could use one or two extra people to man it. Is it really true that there are 9,000 swap meet spaces there? Any idea who's planning on going or if there will be a car on display? I have never read an account of there ever being a Peerless at Hershey.

----Jeff

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Royal Feltner,

I'm glad you noticed that mention of the Quinby Body Co. I have been adding to the list of coachbuilders associated with Peerless as I find them, which is why I finally added the Peerless Coachbuilders thread to the Peerless Forum. The Austin firm listed there is actually Austin of England, who "armored-up" Peerless truck chassis' into armored cars in the WWI era. There are dozens of photos of these Peerlesses on the web: on the battlefield, in Estonia, in the British Isles, in Russia, and in Poland.

I looked at your antique car website and enjoyed the photos.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Jeff,

Our Peerless booth in Hershey is in the Red field # RCE 69-70-71 Section A

We will be selling some Peerless parts and have Peerless information on hand for viewing.

Ralph Cartino from Maine, Don Bettes Ohio, Ron Koelpin Cleveland, El Chesney N.J. , John Hollansworth Ark. and myself will be there and who knows what other Peerless owners will be there. El has shown her Peerless there several times and there have been other Peerless cars in the show over the years. I am hauling all the stuff for our booth and won't have room for a Peerless car. It's a long haul from here to Hershey. October is a great tour month in Wisconsin and I would rather be cruising the back roads here in my Peerless than sitting at a swap meet but it will be good to see some of the Peerless people that we seldom see.

RHL

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1912_Peerless_Model_36.JPG

Re: PRF #58

This is the picture of the 1912 Peerless Limousine from The Western Development Museum in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Photo credit: Trekphiler on Wikipedia's listing for the Peerless Motor Car Company.

post-49853-143138108475_thumb.jpg

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Royal Feltner,

That is quite a collection of pictures. The 1908 Mason that you have pictured is a 1907. Mason had the brass radiator in 1908. The 1909 Mason truck you have pictured is mine and also has a 5 passenger body that can be changed. It is a two in one, model 12 built by the Duesenberg brothers in Des Moines. The manual says two men can change bodies in 20 minutes but we have found it takes four of us but we can do it in less than 20 minutes. We did the change at the ACD meet this past weekend.

Something else to ad to your collection is some documented Wisconsin history, I will quote from original papers,"Did you know that the first automobile was conceived and born in Racine, Wisconsin in 1873"? This fact was conceded in "The Horseless Age" Jan. 1904 and recognized at the Automobile Exposition in Paris in 1908 where the Racine inventor, as guest of honor, was hailed as the father of the automobile. The first automobile was designed and built by Dr. J.W. Carhart pastor of M.E. church.

When it made its first appearance on Racine streets newspapers hailed it as a challenge to the horse drawn conveyance and a prophecy of the motor age. However horse owners and others regarded it as a nuisance and source of danger. In its issue of May 7, 1873 the Racine Journal carried its first description of the First American Automobile.

The description is lengthy and I won't put it in here. This is fully documented and yet history doesn't give him credit for it. Wisconsin has had many first but has not been given credit for any. The first self propelled road race 200 miles in 1878. Schoemer built two autos in 1889 and sold one to a friend. One is in the Milwaukee museum. There were 90 auto and truck manufacturers in Wisconsin. Wisconsin was the first state to implement a uniform marking system for all the roads in the State that was soon adopted by the other states and some other countries. I could go on. I have written an article about this and if you are interested I will send you a copy.

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Thank you very much for your letter. In my forty years in the numismatic and antique business, I have always given the dedicated collectors of anything with having more knowledge about their collectons than any dealer has. I have always admired and trusted them. As you know from reading my home page that I started the website as something to do and I knew diddly squat about antique cars other than admiration. I wanted to know about the automobiles that Amesbury body builders made. From there it grew. I have been to every museum, almost all of the international, national and local club automobile meetings web pages. I checked all of the cars on the Brighton to London races, the Wikipedia, Yahoo, and Google images from 1893 to 1929. Evey year had at least thirty five pages. I have checked ever state and local archives that had manufactured an automobile. Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Indiana were my favorites and I have them on my favorite page. Some of these cars took me hours to find and I was extremely lucky when I found them. The Mason car was one of them. Its history is amazing. That is one fine car. The picture that I got did not give a date so I put it in the middle of time it was in business. I will change it. I read about the Carhart and I certainly want all the information that you have on the early Wisconsin cars. I have a Schoemer on my Pre1900 page, but I could use a better one with dates that he made them. I will post all of it on my site under your name. There is so much misinformation about the early cars that has been repeated so many times that it has become a fact. I will give Benz credit for being the first to patent an engine, but not the first to build an automobile. I up-date my site at least every day with new photos that I keep finding. It is fascinating. Thanks again for all of your help. Royal

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johnk,

That's wonderful that you are going to attend Hershey. I've never been there before and wish it weren't six tanks of gas away. The people who are lined up to be there from the Peerless Motor Car Club are some of the real authorities regarding the marque, in my opinion. Are you considering bringing your PEERLESS 8-125? ---Jeff

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Jeff,

I am not bringing my Peerless to Hershey, it is a zoo out there, I would rather take my Peerless to Idaho. When you go east from Wisconsin the traffic gets heavy, the roads are all tolls and gas is expensive. When we go west traffic is light, gas is less, and no tolls. Also my tow vehicle is being used that week by my daughter to haul horses for a show. We share.

I hadn't planned on going to Hershey so I will probably take my wifes Chysler and I will be limited for space. I want to bring a table, chairs, canopy, and some Peerless stuff to display.

I am going to pick up Ron Koelpin in Cleveland, so I won't have much with out a truck.

RHL

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Royal,

You're welcome to use the photo of the 1927 Peerless on your site. Did you mean the one by the stone house or the one with the Packard? I assume you mean one of the photos on the Photo Gallery on this site you find after searching for "Peerless". Just say "Photo by Philippe Mordant" or something to that effect.

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RHL,

Thank you for commenting on the AACA national meet in Hershey. I didn't figure you would be bringing a Peerless...it's enough that our Club will have a booth there. Probably not enough room to display one in the 3 spaces we have, is there? Wouldn't there also be the problem of 14,000 people that walk by a car wanting to put their paws on it...or do folks behave themselves? --Jeff

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Actually the people today at car shows are real good and respect the cars. At Auburn the Interstate battery company provided a tent for the Mason cars and plants and statues for a beautiful atmosphere for the cars and pictures. Nothing was roped off and this made for good pictures. There were hundreds of people there around the cars and no one touched them. And with brass cars fingerprints do tarnish.

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71. Placard at Towe Auto Museum, Sacramento, CA: "1910 Peerless Model 27 7-Passenger Tourer... It is estimated that approximately 35 Peerless cars remain today." --Thank you, Nancy DeWitt, for pic of Peerless and placard

 

72. There will be a Peerless at the Hershey Meet next week: a blue 1920 Model 56 Cloverleaf Roadster is scheduled for the 10/09/09 RM Auction.

 

73. The above car was described by its owner as "The original muscle car" in a Hemmings ad two years ago (see "Peerless Records??" thread, post no. 11).

 

74. The 1927 Peerless for sale at Reynolds Museum, Ltd. in Wetaskiwin, Alberta sold to someone a few months ago. It was a Mod. 6-80 Sedan. New owner & location unknown. Drawing is from a photo I took in February.peerless_3.jpg

 

75. If someone asks you what a Peerless is, you could say:

a) they built their first car in 1900 and had sales of over $100 200 300 Million b)) they started out with a 1-cylinder car and finished with a 16-cylinder

 

76. A great piece about Peerless came out recently (by Glen Woodcock at: Time Machines - September 2009, 18). The article featured a 1929 8-125 shown at a Concours of the Antique & Classic Car Club of Canada.

 

77. Adding up the numbers of all the Peerless cars with the 289 cu. in. six [sometimes called a Peerless Six or a Collins Six], you get: 2,786 Mod. 6-70, 5,565 Mod. 6-72, 3,174 Mod. 6-90, and 3,194 Mod. 6-91 cars, using Philippe's post here about how to identify your Peerless.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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