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Metz Video in Germany

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I got this link from the Metz web page: Metz Video

It shows a nice 1916 Metz 25 putting about the German countryside. Metz was an active exporter at that time, so perhaps there are Metz "oldtimers" more over there.

Phil

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I asked a German teacher at our school to take a look at the video and let me know what was being talked about. He provided me with a translated text as follows:

Driving cars as they did 100 years ago.

Every trip starts with a swallow of water. Kurt makes cares about his cooling system because he wants the trip to be smooth. Built in 1916 in Mass. now driven in South West Pfalen.

"So I'm turning on the gas, give it electricity and start the car." The sound of early cars. The Metz was put back on the stract in 1996. Before that the old-timer was in a museum. When Kurt bought the car his dream came true. After 1500 hours of work the car was brought back to life. "You have a lot of associations with the car, hate/love, but when you drive it the first time, you're very proud." Top speed is 45 Km/h, 30 Km/h is optimal for driving. "Now the road is getting steep and you notice that the motor is working hard and doesn't have the power of today's motors." "We'll just have to be a bit patient, but it will make it." "It has never let me down." Probably didn't let people down in 1916. "Where ever the Metz goes, everyone is interested in it." Everything is original 1916 except for the light generator and the starter, made in 1915. Yes, you can also crank it. Every trip is an experience, "this is life on the street!" Not racing, experiencing and living. "We all live such hectic lives, but if you're forced to drive slow, you'll enjoy it differently. You notice that you can also reach your destination slowly." The trip is the goal and also sometimes the gas station. 35 liters lead free, but his old-timer is not efficient. 25L/100Km. It's hard to say exactly. It depends on the driving; up, down, long stretches. With a full tank, off it goes. Whether in Mass. or Netzan, its wheels keep turning. Maybe it's a bit slow, but it's a good drive.

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Thanks for the translation. The video was obviously intended for the general public, but very well done. Of course, I am more interested in the friction drive aspect. His gear shifting looks like a standard H-pattern instead of the straight-line shift I'd expect in a friction-drive Metz (or am I seeing it incorrectly?).

It's also interesting to note that Metz exported a number of cars to Europe. I wonder if this was one of them?

Phil

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We are looking forward to the Lecture and presentation on Sunday March 29th at the Waltham Museum. We regret to inform attendees that Historian Gerry Beals will not be able to attend and his presentation on the History of Marsh-Metz the Brockton, Ma. connection has been re scheduled for July 11th at the Waltham Museum. Full details to follow.

Waltham Museum Director Al Arena will touch on the Marsh and Metz collaboration.

We have had an overwhelming response to this event and expect a very good showing of owners and historians.

Metz Auto: http://www.metzauto.wordpress.com

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Phil,

I was wondering about the shifting also. But it almost looks like he may be moving the lever to the right (out of the position holder)and the forward (as if shifting down) and then left again (to engage the position holder). Can't tell for sure, but I have talked myself into thinking that way!

Didn't get a translation of the text describing the video, but I believe it may say the car was in Pennsylvania and then in a museum for 40 years?? I'll ask.

Will we see you at Waltham?

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I won't be at Waltham, but I hope somebody takes some pictures if some cars show up. For some reason, the Waltham Museum has no photos of their Metz 22 posted on line. I'd also like to see what's left of the Metz factory, and I'm also curious what happened to all the Metz spare parts when they closed down in '22!

Phil

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