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Model please of Chevrolets in Sahara.


Vintman

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Hi Folks,

...And while on the theme of Chevrolets, we have just had an enquiry from a local historical society imminently planning to do a talk on a trip through the Sahara by Lord & Lady Brocklehurst in 1930, the first convoy of fewer than three cars. They think the vehicles were built in England and that they may be Chevrolets, which indeed they seem to be. The UK registration dates them to Autumn 1929, registered by the London County Council. They are obviously some form of light commercials. Can anybody please put the correct model to them.

Kind Regards

Vintman (UK)

www.svvs.org

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Guest Bob Kerr

With all the hub bolts on the rear They look like 1.5 ton trucks to me but would have been sold as "cowl and chassis" with custom cabs made. I like the steam recovery condensating radiator cap on the one! The diamond tread tires are Goodyear.

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<span style="font-style: italic">75 Years of Chevrolet</span> has an entire page (p.84) of British bodied 1929 Chevrolet trucks. These trucks do not appear, but the fender lights mark them as British built models. They are 1929 Series L.Q. 1.5 ton models with custom bodies.

Does anyone know what the sheet metal covered thing in front of the lower right hand portion of the radiator is? It appears to be connected via belt or chain to the crank. Both trucks have them. Could they be a power take off?

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I had assumed the these gizmos were winches because something in a channel leads to the hook. It could be that the hook is normally screwed down if the vehicle was being pulled, but the bolt would be taken out when the hook was used with the winch to do the pulling?? Would be interesting to hear any other ideas.

Kind Regards

Vintman (UK)

www.svvs.org

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I think they may be 32 volt, or possibly 110 or 220 Volt generators to supply power to the camp when they are set up to power lights at night or to run other stuff. The hooks appear to be bolted to the frame rails and bolted solid. The hole in the front bumper, drive attached, is used for a hand crank. Dandy Dave!

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More 29's!!

They are highly modified RHD commercials. No expense spared here.

The 1929 shape was used until about 1931/2 [in the USA].

Is it the same lady in both pics?

Fascinating photos. Can u give us some info on the desert expedition/Brockhursts?

Manuel in Oz

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1DandyDaves</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I think they may be 32 volt, or possibly 110 or 220 Volt generators to supply power to the camp when they are set up to power lights at night or to run other stuff. The hooks appear to be bolted to the frame rails and bolted solid. The hole in the front bumper, drive attached, is used for a hand crank. Dandy Dave! </div></div>

Good call, I thought they were winches, but I could not see anyplace that a cable could work, plus lacking a cable guide that should have been there. Good guess on the low voltage too, like the old windpower stuff in the remote US. There were radios and whatnot for that voltage already available.

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Had some more fascinating feedback from the enquirer. Money was not a problem in building these vehicles. The condensing rad cap was mentioned in Lady B’s diary as being too small and not being very efficient, sometimes shooting out jets of boiling water. The vehicles boiled a lot and most of their water went to satiate them.

On the device over the bumper, the diary says that ate at night to vehicle headlights, suggesting it was not a generator. However the non-technical enquirer mentions that the diary said that on one night the car was left on, and the battery went flat, so they had to use the auxiliary magneto which was a wonderful device. Chain driven bolt-on goodie ??!! Any thoughts.

The expedition did nearly 6000 miles, averaging 18 miles to the gallon. Did not open bonnet once and finished in a splendid condition apart from having to replace one valve spring, and had one puncture. That sound like my type trans-continental of expedition !!!

Will try get a bit more info on the epedition.

Kind Regards

Vintman (UK)

www.svvs.org

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">On the device over the bumper, the diary says that ate at night to vehicle headlights, suggesting it was not a generator. However the non-technical enquirer mentions that the diary said that on one night the car was left on, and the battery went flat, so they had to use the auxiliary magneto which was a wonderful device. Chain driven bolt-on goodie ??!! Any thoughts.

</div></div>

These could have been the magnetos that is spoken of. As a generating device the truck would of had to be running, and consuming gas to provide power. Maybe they decided that they did not want to spare the fuel. With a dead battery, if it was spun fast enough. It is possible that it would have started the truck. Or, possibly magnetos are under the covers as a back up ignition source in case the battery and ignition system failed. On vehicles much earlier than this, twin ignition systems were common. Twin ignition was also common on fire trucks. With that said, I bet they are magnetos as the 6 cylinder Chevys of this era would not have had the gearing to put a mag under the hood. The easiest way to add one would have been off of the front like these. Dandy Dave!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Had some more information on Lord and Lady Brocklehurst from our enquirer:

(Quote:) .......Re the reason for the journey, I’m afraid we don’t really know. Nothing is stated in the diary about it. Our speculation was they did it because they were adventurers. Certainly Philip was - he’d already been from Sudan to Kano in Northern Nigeria by horse and boat when he was in the army (he was stationed in Sudan after WW1). And Lady B mentions they’d been together to the Sudan in 1925. And we think a few more times as well. Philip’s brother was also Game Warden in the Sudan for 10 years at least and was there in 1930.

(Quote:) .......Philip also went with Shackleton on his first expedition to Antarctica. He loved cars too so we think this journey was a combination of these two things he loved.

(Quote:) .......I've read through the diary again and found another reference to the magneto which supports the idea that it is indeed the contraption we can see on the bumper in the photos. Lady B says: P.’s radiator is leaking, but we can’t mend it till we have more time as the magneto is in the way.

(Quote:) .......On a separate topic but one I thought might interest you she says: The Sultan is very keen on motors and drives himself in a Ford coupé. He was most interested in our cars and was especially delighted with the power tyre pumps. (I certainly didn't realise they had power pumps in those days. As they let their tyres down regularly to cross the sand in places, they were obviously very useful.) (UnQuote)

Does anybody have any information if the external unit above the bumper could be the tyre pump. If so, where would the extra magneto be. 1DandyDaves mentioned the space problem under the bonnet. I see no wires nor pipes for either function. Any thoughts please.

Kind Regards

Vintman (UK)

www.svvs.org

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Many larger early autos had an air compressor attached below the floorboards that could be shifted in and out of gear if air was required. I would say from the mid 1900's up into the 20's. Dandy Dave!

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Many thanks 1DandyDaves. For technical accuracy (as this will probably go into their lecture!!), could you confirm that this would have been located under the driver's cab floor and presumably mechanically driven off the engine or gear box (which?). What sort of engagement mechanism would it have been?? Clutch/foot pedal?? Much appreciated.

Kind Regards

Vintman (UK)

www.svvs.org

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Guest 1928Packard526

Vintman —

I don't know if this air pump accessory that appears on both of my cars is the sort of compressor to which you are making reference. The same style pump, made by Kellog, is mounted on the side of the transmission on both my cars. The cars are a '28 Packard and a '29 Lincoln. The Packard accessory catalog for '28 has a clear picture of the pump. I apologize for the quality of my attachment, but here is the page on which the pump appears.

The long shaft at the left extends through the floorboard and allows the engagement of the pump gear by a twist of that shaft on both cars. The Lincoln Manual gives instruction on its engagement and operation. 1000 engine rpm in neutral is recommended as a speed for the pump.

Pete P.

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In addition.....These were driven off of the PTO (Power Take Off) which would be mounted to the side of the transmission. PTO's are still in use today to power a variety of attachments of which the most popular would be a dump body for a dump truck, or a winch used on a wrecker. Dandy Dave!

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