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msmazcol

Restoration underway on a 1936 Divco S model

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Are you a ebay guy? That is where mine came from.

Also I just checked they are available through amazon.com .

New copies $24.95

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Even with the Thanksgiving holiday approaching I was able to sneak into the shop today. I rolled the front axle in and proceeded to disassemble it. After removing the front drums the mouse hotels were removed at the lower end of the brake area. The axle bearings actually look decent and had lube in them. How about that? We'll remove the backing plates along with the steering arms to get better access for sand blasting. After the sandblasting is done the king pins get removed and inspected. I have an NOS set here if they are needed. Some of the brake hardware will need some soaking with PB but it will come apart soon enough. The bolts in the wheel cylinders came right out much to my surprise. Some of the old steel was better than anything we have today that is for sure.

Hope everyone has a safe and happy holiday.

Please remember the soldiers who can't be home with their families this holiday.

Thank you.

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Back in the shop today! The Christmas stuff can wait another day. I was able to remove the rear axle shafts and rear brake drums. Both drums were frozen in place by the shoes. One side was so bad I beat the shoes loose from the drum. The four legged creatures certainly like all four brake areas for condo units. Now I can get the drums and hubs sandblasted. We'll epoxy prime them and the turn the drums. At that point I'll take the shoes and drums to the

re-liner here in the area. A measurement from the drums will make for a better fit on the shoe linings.

I will also add this to the wanted forum but I am looking for two Dayton style dust plates that bolt inside the rear brake drums. They are a sheet metal plate measuring about 12" ,center hole about 5". They have a raise outer lip and also a raised area near the inside hole to accommodate the seals in the inner hub and bearing area. If we can't find two we'll have to make them. Just thought I'd give it a try.

Thanks

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Needed Brake Parts.

Have begun re-build of brakes on my current project.

The following Wagner Lockheed parts are needed:

FC 3103 (2) return springs

FC 3123 (4) lower shoe guides

FC 3130 (4) upper shoe guides

The applications are thought to be Mack 39-50, GMC 40-49, White 46-57, and Divcos which is what I'm working on.

The shoe guides are tack welded to the backing plate but are a serviceable item according to my info.

I will also need additional brake parts for this application but this stuff is top priority to find.

Please contact me with any help on this via PM. Thanks

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Transmission and bell housing in place. Gear shift rebuilt including the throttle linkage. We could not find correct spring loaded linkage bells so made all new ones. All new linkage rods as well. Throttle can be operated at the shifter as well as with a small foot pedal.

We'll remove the accessories as well as other misc to allow a soda strip of the cheap paint keeping the rust under control while working on the motor. Epoxy prime and color to be applied.

This motor was by far one of the worst we have ever been involved in restoring. The word junk is the only word that comes to mind. It now runs great with the help of an awesome machinist.

Still looking for some help on the exhaust manifold. Can't find one and sure don't like the way it looks.

Has anyone had good luck with repairs prior to applying a finish to a manifold. I would consider porcelain or ceramic if some one has a prep that actually will give good results.

Any tips please let me know.

Thanks

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Just a bit of linkage now rebuilt. The one arm sticking up in the air is the main pedal located on the floor. It is a combination of a clutch and brake pedal. Part way down being clutch a bit too much and into the window the driver goes. The long handle that looks like a parking brake is actually a brake snubber allowing you to slow or lightly brake while turning. It also activates the wet brakes and is not for parking. The additional handle seen on the transmission is the normal parking brake.

Every shaft and every bushing including all of the throttle linkage has been built new. In other words if it moved it was wore out!

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Transmission and bell housing in place. Gear shift rebuilt including the throttle linkage. We could not find correct spring loaded linkage bells so made all new ones. All new linkage rods as well. Throttle can be operated at the shifter as well as with a small foot pedal.

We'll remove the accessories as well as other misc to allow a soda strip of the cheap paint keeping the rust under control while working on the motor. Epoxy prime and color to be applied.

This motor was by far one of the worst we have ever been involved in restoring. The word junk is the only word that comes to mind. It now runs great with the help of an awesome machinist.

Still looking for some help on the exhaust manifold. Can't find one and sure don't like the way it looks.

Has anyone had good luck with repairs prior to applying a finish to a manifold. I would consider porcelain or ceramic if some one has a prep that actually will give good results.

Any tips please let me know.

Thanks

Beautiful work! Is that a GTX or Roadrunner attached to the rally wheel in the background?

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Transmission and bell housing in place. Gear shift rebuilt including the throttle linkage. We could not find correct spring loaded linkage bells so made all new ones. All new linkage rods as well. Throttle can be operated at the shifter as well as with a small foot pedal.

We'll remove the accessories as well as other misc to allow a soda strip of the cheap paint keeping the rust under control while working on the motor. Epoxy prime and color to be applied.

This motor was by far one of the worst we have ever been involved in restoring. The word junk is the only word that comes to mind. It now runs great with the help of an awesome machinist.

Still looking for some help on the exhaust manifold. Can't find one and sure don't like the way it looks.

Has anyone had good luck with repairs prior to applying a finish to a manifold. I would consider porcelain or ceramic if some one has a prep that actually will give good results.

Any tips please let me know.

Thanks

Calyx Manifold Dressing

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Thanks for the tip on the Calyx. Looks like a great product. I have pits that are beyond being filled by a paint product.

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As a running joke I keep asking one of the past owners what kind of maintenance schedule they kept? After all this was a fleet vehicle, they always get the best of care right? He laughs and tells me when he was a kid his Dad had him grease the truck.

I asked him if his Dad told how to pump the handle.

LOL

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Slow but steading progress is being made on the restoration. A remodeling project for a friend sidetracked me a bit, but here is the latest work coming out of the machine shop.

The front axle has been sandblasted and fitted with new king pins. I actually found a set on ebay that were correct. The backing plates were removed to allow access to the pins.

One of our biggest challenges has been brake hardware. The front brakes use a double webbed shoe different than any other we have seen. The large pivot pins that the shoes pivot on were destroyed by rust. They are about 15/16 in diameter and hold the shoes to the backing plates. They are also responsible for shoe adjustments so are important. After little success locating new ones replacements were custom made.

The third photo shows shoe hardware from the rear axle. The pins were locatable and the bushings were OK. Two new flat backing plate stiffeners were made.

We will clean the front axle up and prime and paint it. The backing plates will be installed.

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Also completed is the Gemmer steering box. This unit was badly damaged from the water running down the steering tube and locking up the bearings in the case. The steering wheel had to be cut off the top of the center shaft. The box was completely disassembled. New bearing cones were available however races were not. The adjustment of the bearing against the race controls the tightness of the box. Since the correct races could not be found two new races were machined and then sent out for hardening. The center shaft which was locked up and then cut off to remove the steering wheel was made new also. The worm gear was pressed off and the new shaft was fitted to the internals of the box which were usable. A new outer steering tube was located and cut to length. A nylon bushing was added at the upper end to add support to the shaft. The upper end of the shaft was keyed and fitted to a NOS wheel. The wire in the center of the shaft is to be used as a fish line for the horn wire.

After many hours of machine work the box now turns with an ease it probably never had even new.

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Edited by msmazcol (see edit history)

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Been awhile since a update so I figured it was due. The front axle has new king pins installed and was sandblasted, had all pits filled and a fresh coat of epoxy primer sprayed on.

The chassis which had excessive amounts of surface pitting due to the weather exposure for many years now is starting to look good again. After about a full week of body work on top of the first coat of epoxy the major pits were filled. Now a coat of high build primer has been applied and the frame will once again be sanded smooth. A second coat of epoxy will seal the high build. After the epoxy is done we will bolt all of the spring mount brackets back in place. After they are bolted in place one bolt at a time gets removed and a correct heat peened rivet will be installed. The heating of the rivets will damage the epoxy slightly but we have no choice. The spring brackets all were heavily rusted between the bracket and the frame. The sandblasting and good coat of epoxy will stop this from ever happening again. After all the rivets are installed we will scuff the frame again and re-coat the epoxy one more time. After that is done a coat of Eastwoods ceramic satin black chassis paint will be sprayed on. After painting a test panel with the product we have decided the results look good.

While the progress is slow it still is forward. That is all that is needed to get it done.

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Thanks for the reply on the generator. My C 400 was equipped with a Delco unit. The generator has a through shaft driving the water pump on the rear of the block. Would this Bosch unit be a replacement?

The Delco is rebuilt with extensive work going into it because it was a freak.

Could you supply me with a photo?

Delco 968K

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Edited by msmazcol (see edit history)

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Dropped off the four leaf spring assembles at the sandblaster today. Knocked them all down first and checked for any broken leafs. Purchased two new mains for the fronts as they were worn through the bushings. We'll get all of the loose leafs blasted then apply several good coats of black epoxy primer.

The units will then be bolted back together with new center bolts, etc.

After they are back as a unit we'll scuff the outsides again and re-epoxy, plus apply Eastwood's ceramic chassis paint. The finished spring will hopefully never have rust leaking out of them as long as I may live!

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Edited by msmazcol
photo (see edit history)

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Thanks for the tip on the spray weld. It was one of the ideas we have thought of. The manifold is currently in the hands of a outstanding tractor restoration expert. He commonly saves parts that simply cannot be duplicated.

We have faith in him to supply a good finished product. Our only fear of the spray weld is the need to apply heat. With enough abuse I'm worried this old die cast will simply self destruct. So far another manifold is yet to surface.

Thanks

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Spring hanger mounts bolted in place, crossmember also. New front motor mounts installed. Rear mounts also in place.

Need an extra set of hands in the shop and one bolt at a time will be removed installing a rivet in it's place on the hangers.

Engine mounts were bolted originally.

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New photos after next coat of epoxy primer.

Heavy pitting repair complete.

Spring hangers can now be re-riveted.

Out of curiosity how did you repair the heavy pitting? I am working on a 1964 Tempest and it's frame also has heavy pitting. So far I have descaled it (pneumatic descaler) and sprayed it with rustoleum primer and then rustoleum semi-gloss black.

Phil

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This is how we went about it. I'm sure others will have a different view.

We started with an aggressive sand blasting using a pro that does it for a living. Immediately after the sandblasting a coat of two part epoxy primer was sprayed on. This seals and also creates a excellent base to build on. The epoxy dried to a full cure due to timing so we lightly sanded the primer and actually had to apply body filler to the really deep pits. The filler was sanded. When the majority of the pits were filled a coat of a high build primer was sprayed on. It goes on almost clumpy. When that was dry it was all sanded including inside the frame rails. When most of the high build only remains in the pits another coat of epoxy was applied. Now the spring brackets were bolted on. They will be riveted which will most likely cause some damage to the primer. After that is complete we will re-sand one more time, spray one more coat of epoxy as a bonding agent and immediately apply Eastwood chassis ceramic paint.

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