Jump to content

Recommended Posts

That's how I did it except I used a drill press and put set screws in both sides of the bellcrank. One side might be all you need.

Also a drop of blue Locktite will ensure the screws don't get loose.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a somewhat acceptable solution. When you drill the hole, go all the way through... then tap all the way and you now have the ability to put a set screw in from both sides.

What I don't like about this fix.. you don't capture the shaft firmly, the set screws only contact a small spot on the shaft and if it starts to move, you will probably ruin the motor shaft. When that happens, you have damaged a part that we don't have replacements for.

Link to post
Share on other sites

OTOH the shaft has a flat there but that position will only work if the bell crank hole is completely rounded. If not, the screw will contact the side and not the flat. (see att)

This means that the set screw really needs to go in the end under the rod (the other end is obscured by the tab)and be sure to contact the flat of the shaft. I would also use a conical and not a pointed set screw with a touch of Locktite blue (I only use red on axle pinion bolts or where coming loose would be catastrophic).

The set screw approach is certainly feasible and inexpensive if you have a drill press with a good vice and are very careful. We corresponded about this and I agree that it seems to be workable otherwise.

And on the gripping hand, Barney's bellcrank is simple, elegant, fast, is a bolt in, and should outlast the car. No machining necessary. Another case where you trade time and effort for dollars.

post-31022-14313803793_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I should have said in my previous post that hole in one of my bellcranks was completely rounded out. With the other bellcrank I drilled out the hole to make it round before installing the set screws. That way you can align the set screws with the flats on the shaft. Mine have worked perfectly for about 2 years now.

Barney's bellcranks are a great option if you don't have the time or means to install the set screws. If someone tells me they are having problems with the bellcranks I always recommend his product. However, I may add this information to my website for those who rather repair the bellcranks themselves. If that is OK with blazer1997.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry and all.....I did not say this was a bad idea, just pointed out the possible problems. I have experimented with headlight fixes for about 10 years and there are lots of thing that can be done. It depends on how much equipment, tools and skills you have.

Attached is a sketch for a fix that I feel is good if you want to make your own parts. You will find dimensions at www.reatta.net under the headlight repair.

It has it problems. the thicker the bracket material the longer it will last....but adding thickness reduces the amount of threads on the nut end. If you had a milling maching, you could take .050-.100 cut off the end of the bellcrank, then you would not loose threads, but few people have a mill. There are no dimension on the sketch, it is just to show how the bracket sits on the top (motor side) of the bellcrank and the formed end goes down between the gussets on the bellcrank. If you file a nice, tight fitting hole for the shaft and make the formed end fit snug between the gussets, this will last a long time.

I make a steel replacement bellcrank (someone coined them "Barney Cranks") because they work very well. Will probably last as long as the car.......and most importantly, the owner just installs them or gives them to his mechanic...... no skill or special equipment involved.

post-30596-143138038103_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used GM starter shims, the thicker one (.o60)I think, and used a hand file to take a little metal off the bell crank so I had the same amount of threads. I used a bench grinder to size the metal and a vice to bend them. Electric drill for hole then a chain saw file to make it fit the motor shaft. I will order the Barney cranks as soon as my stimulus check gets here. LOL

Here is how I did it with no special tools

Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem is that when I bought a pair of Barney Cranks for my coupe, I am fairly sure that I discarded the old worn bell cranks. I will need a replacement or repaired/modified set for the my other Reatta, and would like to experiment if I could find a set of worn cranks. Any one willing to part with some worn ones? I will pay smile.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://forums.aaca.org/ubbthreads.php/topics/555397/Selling_Reatta_Headlamp_Parts_#Post555397

The problems with headlights are solved if you want them to be. I have seen and used Mr Baker's products and they are second to none. I dare say they are as good or better than OEM. I believe he donates a portion of his proceeds to the American Cancer Society too. How can you beat that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have recently completed a new retro-fit of the OEM crank arm and would like for you to take a look at it on the "Buy/Sell" '

parts section of the Forum. Will be on there shortly. Also, will place on Ronnie's Journal. Some changes with respect to core requirement are being made.

Different strokes for different folks!

Kingsley

Link to post
Share on other sites

Too bad someone hasn't figured a way to put in some attractive non-retracting headlamps. I need some Barney cranks for mine. I leave them up in the winter months. I like the Reatta, but not the headlights.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Worn out nylon rollers and/or worn bellcranks are usually the problem with headlights not opening properly.

Instructions for replacing the nylon rollers in the gearbox can be found here on my website. The rollers can be purchased on eBay for about 6 bucks.

Detailed instructions for repairing the bellcranks can be found here on my website . They can be repaired for the cost of two screws if you have the skill and tools to drill and tap two or three holes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ronnie he is a picture for your web site if you don't already have it.

This give the Reatta owner an idea of where the rollers are located, and show what they look like when they go bad.

I see someone is selling metal (aluminum I think) rollers.

I think we should stick with the plastic rollers because they act like a fuse...if something is stuck the rollers go first. Motors, white gears, and other parts are expensive, the rollers are cheap.

post-30596-143138039744_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Barney, I appreciate the photo. I agree that it is a mistake to use aluminum rollers.

I would like to take this opportunity to invite you to list your barneycranks and rollers, or anything else you may have for sale,in the classified ads section of my website. It has a category for "parts for sale".

The same invitation goes out to anyone with parts for sale.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Barney also has a kit of bellcrank, serrated nut, and rollers that is a wise choice - do both at once and forget it.

Hard part for me is the two lower headlamp assembly attaching nuts. There is one screw on the headlamp retaining ring just waiting to slice your wrist - remove first.

Speaking of which this is a good time to replace the headlamps with something better. I like Sylvania Silverstars (plug)

Finally, be gentle when removing the three screws that hold the motor gear cover, they are no fun to drill and tap.

Use of excessive force to remove the one (right ?) gear is authorized. You really do not want to remove the armature (motor) unless you absolutely have to (and have some safty wire to hold the brushes in).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget to check the routing of the headlight wiring.

It comes up between the fender and headlight casting, then over the casting and makes a 90 degree bend into the back of the headlight.

Many Reatta owners have the wire routed incorrectly and the opening and closing of the headlights will break the copper wires inside the jacket. The wire looks fine but the lights don't work.

Photo shows routing and headlight UP-STOP

post-30596-143138039847_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

a) Thread is timely again.

B) if the black wire (ground) breaks inside the connector (usual place), the light will come on dimly on both low and high beam. Usually it will come on full bright if you push the wire into the connector

The connector can be opened by popping the two catchs, the connector spread with an awl, old wire pushed out, about 1/4" of stripped back black wire pushed in and recrimped with small needle nose. There should be enough slack in the black wire to allow this (just went through process with driver's side headlamp on white car)

Link to post
Share on other sites

When it comes to headlamp motors, the guru is Ken Peters of Tucson, AZ. He know these motors and their Buick/Chevrolet/Pontiac/Oldsmobile applications from top to bottom, inside and out. His motor rebuilds are listed on EBay. Contact (520) 577-2379, partfiero@comcast.net. Great fellow.

In a previous comment, perhaps on the Buy/Sell secion, I made a statement that the Reatta motor was stronger than the Fiero motor. This surprised Padgett and he outlined the basis for his questioning. In conversation with Ken this morning he sustained Padgett's position that the Fiero motor is the stronger of the two. I stand corrected and just want to set the record straight.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...