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Driver Education-Self Taught!


R W Burgess

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What upsets me about these stories is why the boy was going to school for "breakfast". His lazy good for nothing mother should have been up and had his breakfast ready and had him outside when the bus came. It's unbelievable that the taxpayer should have to feed the students as well as educate them while the parents (if that is the right term) (perhaps they should be called sperm donor and breeder) sit at home and do nothing but smoke and/or drink. Not enough money to provide meals for the children but most of them have liquor in the cupboard and cigarettes. Proper supervision costs nothing but the will to do it. The problem is that many people think the State/Province owes them. HAH, the State/Province (government) has nothing, it is us the taxpayer that pays for it all, and we the silent majority let them do it.

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Wayne,

While it may have happened in your part of the country, it is probably all too common many places. Why get out of bed in the morning when the kid can get dressed himself and get to school for breakfast, and the government will do it for you. Oh maybe they should send someone to the house to make sure he is out on time.

I am afraid "we" have destroyed the initiative for many people.

Is it too late to corect this situation.

John

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It starts at home, John. As our age group sees some of the irresponsibilities of our grandchildren, it's really hard not to say something to our adult kids, the parents, about it. Lots of hard feelings involved.

As a farmboy example, my middle daughter is with us from the college break. Well, she's spoiling my barn yard cat to death. Another week and he'll forget what his purpose in life was around our neighborhood....to rid the area of rodents and English Sparrows! confused.gif No disrespect intended for our British friends, the human ones, anyway. grin.gif

By the way, the mother of the child in question was still in jail this morning. The father was released as he was at work. Juvinal affairs has the other child. Anyway, we're gone off topic here.

Wayne

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I wonder how many people that are reading this lock up their car keys at night before they go to bed?

Oh! and how about the spare set that every kid over 3 kmows where it is kept?

I think that the law is reaching here.

Don't forget to lock up the butcher knives and the power saw and the chisels and the nails and the hammer ( that one will realy do damage in someones hands). Maybe you should lock up the kid at night.... (no, thats against the law too!

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Thanks Roger. You said a mouthful. I lived in this area for many years, although not as long as Wayne. It is very, very country where some people drive 100 miles each way every day in order to work. Until we really know why the mother was asleep, I'll keep an open mind. Local government child welfare organizations often go well overboard.

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Guest quadfins

And so which came first?

Parental irresponsibility requiring government agency intervetion,

or

Government agency creation, resulting in parental abdication of responsibility?

Which is the chicken, and which is the egg?

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I think quadfins has a good question and maybe part of the answer.

Did we have a few parents that partially abdicated their responsibility, followed by government over stepping their assistance, followed by a few more parents saying to .... with it lets get some of this free stuff and round and round it goes.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: R W Burgess</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I know that many of you think that we're a little backward down here in this part of Virginia. But, we do take our schooling, uh, education seriously. smile.gif </div></div>

Wayne,

Let me insert this "ad" for safe driving here: As an aside about driver education in Virginia, I found that if you don't teach your kids how to drive safely and properly yourself, don't expect the schools to do a thorough job. Many do not. My daughter's driver's ed teacher let the kids "Virginia-Slide" into the right lane on a left turn, saying it was "okay, just pick a lane." Luckily, my daughter, in fear of me tearing up her permit, told her otherwise. At least the requirements have improved, but one doesn't see the simulator driving sessions we had in high school, and the new stricter requirements that they have in Pennsylvania.

So no matter where you live, take responsibility and teach your kids the right way to drive. Make them change a tire and check the oil, etc. They may holler about getting dirty, and about your insistance on safe driving methods (I had a "Job Qualification Requirement Card" they had to finish- they hated it but finished it), but it might just save a life later.

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Guest windjamer

I dont know about today, but in 1960s in Germany the student took a written test well over a hr. long and then had to demostrate ckecking all lights fluids and change a tire befor getting behind the wheel for the ROAD TEST> Male female made no differance

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Someone needs to report that drivers ed teacher to the principal or to the board of education.

We had a great drivers ed teacher. He taught us to never turn our wheels before making a turn, like when you are stopped waiting to turn. Especially if you are turning left and will be crossing a traffic lane. This is because if your vehicle is ever hit from the rear you will be pushed into oncoming traffic. This bit of advice saved my ex-husband's life along with his stepson. He actually called me and told me that it happened to him and that he had almost turned the wheels and "heard" me telling him not to do that.

Our teacher also taught us that the posted speed limit is for optimum conditons. That 5 mph should be deducted for darkness, rain, etc. And that when you stop, you should be able to see the bottom edge of the rear tires on the vehicle in front of you. That allows room for roll-back of a standard shift and leaves a cushion so that if your vehicle is bumped from behind it won't hit the vehicle in front of you.

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Susan,

The things your Drivers Ed. teacher taught you ( not turning front wheels into on-coming lane, see bottom of tires of car stopped in front of you, etc.) are great advice, and are still being stressed in our most recent AARP Safe Driver course. By the way, Dale and I have been rescuing DALMATIANS for nearly 40 years - they loved to ride our vintage Fire Engines in Mardi Gras Parades.

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Hi Wayne,

Glad to hear that the 'Vette was only suffering with GAS in SC. --- Loved the wide-whites on the tow-vehicle, too!!

My 16-plus year association with AARP is genuine, as some of us represent the

A-Antique (or Antiquated)

A-Addle-pated

R-Road-Tested

P-Procratintator

Can you believe that the AARP Safe Driving instructor told the class that Louisiana has no "Keep to the Right-Law" so it is OK to drive in any lane you choose -- and that is just the beginning of why we have such terrible, and inconsiderate drivers.

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I don't think many school districts in VA/NC teach driver's ed anymore. I sure see a lot of private driving instruction going on.

I worked as a driver's ed student aide my senior high school year. It was a first period study hall and several of us were looking for something to do as we all had our schoolwork done when we got to school. We rode shotgun with the students and had a brake pedal, and the instructor broadcast the instructions over AM radio. Sometimes we'd go out on the road with them.

What I could never figure out was why, invariably, the smallest kid, who had never even sat behind the wheel of a car, would go for the biggest car we had. And in 1974, those were a Dodge Monaco and an Olds 88.

Local dealers would supply DE cars. The Pontiac dealer slipped up once and brought us a 1973 LeMans sedan- with a 455 under the hood! School didn't keep that one very long...

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How about this Glenn? My Driver's Ed teacher knew I grew up "on the farm", so he'd make me show those other kids (they rode in the backseat)how to ride the clutch and keep the DE car static, while on a hillside. How many kids even know how to drive a stick anymore? confused.gif

All of my 5 kids, except one can drive stick, and that girl catches flack from the rest. grin.gif

Wayne

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I wouldn't allow my son to get his drivers license until he not only could drive a straight shift but could do so to my satisfaction. In my 45 years of driving not over 18 months has been with an automatic.

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Marty, In Maryland the only way people know how to turn is by cutting corners. If you pull up to the stop sign, they'll stop in the middle of the road and wait for you to go before making making a left into the street you are coming out of. I've been unpleasantly surprised to see that many of those Maryland people must have moved to Sebring, FL. If anything, it's worse here.

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My Dad was a laundry truck driver in DC. He taught me to drive and taught me to ride the clutch on a hill. Some cars of the time had "hill holders" which was an accessory for those who didn't know how to ride the clutch. Drivers Ed at the time said we "shouldn't ride the clutch" but keep our foot on the brake. I was always scared to death the car was roll back into the bumper rider behind me before I could transfer my foot to the clutch and get the car going. Have always thanked my Dad for that instruction

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The guy next door who does a lot of restoration work on my cars has trouble with the straight shift even. He learned to drive on them. I am able to ride the clutch well enough that even with a slightly grabby clutch I can coax it into a smooth to semi-smooth takeoff. That's all folks, no more jawboning today. Catch you at the Lakeland Winter National Meet February 28. If you haven't signed up yet, you'll still got until February 7th. We need 300 Buicks at this show to show 'em where it's at......hahahahaha

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Guest windjamer

I tought all my kids when stoped in the middle or top of a hill to simply apply the hand brake. When able to go just give it a little gas let out the clutch and when they feel it start to take hold releace the hand brake. Now on to smart kids.

My collage educated daughter called me from Paul Smith Collage and told me she and three of her girl friends wanted to drive to Fla. for spring brake. This was a life time ago and I had a 76 Ford ranchwagon. The daughter wanted to use the wagon for the girls lugage, tent and camping supplys. I reluctantly agreed but insisted they carry a emergancy box witch I would pack. I took a cardboard box and in it I put new fan belts a new electronic control modual, cap, rotor,hoses and extry qts. of oil. The daughter called AAA got the average price for gas the millage round trip and asked me what the Ford would get per. gal.I did not know it untill they got back but the girls had figured the cost of gas, camp ground rent and each had $20. for spending money. Of course they raided moms cobourd for food. On the way back, driving through PA. maby a hundred miles from home and near midnight the oil lite started to flash. My collage educated daughter solved this problem by placeing an envilope over the lite. Lucklly no harm was done and I just needed to add three qts. of oil the next morning. Oh well it was due for change anyway. Some time ask me how about a hundred lbs. of loose sand got inside the car the frame under the hood and evan in the spair tire well. Can you burry a Ford ranch wagon on the baech at Fla.??? BTW, the extry oil was still in the box.

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I too wonder if driver's ed is taught in NC, or, if it is, did the students learn anything. There is a 4-way stop near here, and when I've come to it, and 2 other cars at about the same time, the other 2 have NOOOO idea who goes first!!! Is 'right-of-way' a forgotten term? I think it is here anyway. I avoid that 4-way stop as much as possible....B

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My husband Bill tried to teach his now ex-wife how to drive a standard shift. Didn't work. She blew the rear end out of his new Torino.

My best friend in college taught me how to drive her mom and dad's standard shift Opal Cadet. My dad taught me the things like how to use the clutch and gas to hold the car on a hill and not have it roll back.

Now I drive our standard shift, 6-speed Dodge quad-cab diesel hauling a 31' combination car/camper trailer. I do admit that I don't back the trailer. I am sure I could learn to back it. I just have never taken the time to learn.

Bill used to work on farms when he was young and he can back hay wagons, which anyone that has done that can tell you it is not easy. He even used to back the double wagons. Back in August he actually backed our 35' Winnebago Adventurer with our PT Cruiser on a tow dolly into a space at a gas station in Va. Even the truckers were watching as he did it. One of them told him what a great job he did.

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