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Just got this and i have no clue what it is HELP!!!!


Guest a_danner

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Guest CutNChop

What a beauty! That one shouldn't be touched.

Just wash it, get it running, steering and stopping and leave the wonderful "patina" as is, it's fantastic.

You can just imagine the stories it could tell.

Great find...where did it come from???

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Guest a_danner

I found this car in somerset Pa. I saw this car and just new i had to add it to the collection. i was not even sure what it was. I am only 22 years old, and already have a collection of 5 cars, not all old, but still all cars. I had never seen a flathead inline 4 and dont know much about them but with any luck the car should be running soon, i have not yet touched it, actully im not real sure of what to even do with it, so any ideas would be great. Thanks alot for the help guys!!!

-Adam

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Guest Dean_H.

Great looking car, it appears very complete. If possible clean it up and drive it as is. Hard to beat the preservation thing. The camera must make you look older than 22. ;-)

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Guest a_danner

that is my uncle, he also got a 51 coronet with 9,000 original miles, the thing still had the plastic covers on the seats... its a beauty!!

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Guest a_danner

The t-bird was my buddies dads project, he passed away a few years back and no one has touched the car, and it is not for sale, the the chassis in front is a 1923ish? chevy truck..... its basiclly a cab and you build your own bed and what not not real sure of the year but i think it is very early 20's

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Those Dodges are good cars. Not that hard to find parts for and they've got a good engine. They didn't change the drive train much from year to year (compared to other cars). So parts aren't much of a problem.

A few things you may not be familiar with if you haven't had a 1920's car before:

Vacuum tank - This is before mechanical fuel pumps. It will have a cylinder mounted on the firewall or engine with fuel and vacuum lines going to it. Resist the temptation to put an electric fuel pump on it. An electric pump will put out more pressure than the carb can handle. The vacuum tanks aren't hard to rebuild. They're very simple mechanisms. The kits are available and cheap.

Glass - Your Dodge has plate glass for the windsheild and all windows. Before you drive it much, it's a VERY good idea to replace this glass with saftey glass. If you should have a "mishap" with the car, the plate glass could be deadly. Remove the original glass, and take it to your local glass shop. Any decent glass shop can use the originals to make nice SAFE new saftey glass windows & a windsheild for you. It shouldn't be very expensive... probably $50 to $80 per pane.

Tires - You're not far from one of the world's leading suppliers of vintage tires. Universal Tire is in Hershey, PA. Just go to www.universaltire.com. They'll have the tires, tubes, and flaps that you need, and you can just drive over and save the shipping.

Rims - Your car has colapsable split rims. They're safe, not like the truck split rims. But to change the tires you'll need to either buy or borrow a "rim spreader". They're plentiful and easy to find. The rim spreader colapses the rim so you can remove the tire. Then when you put the new tire and tube in place, the rim spreader pushes the rim back into place.

Transmission - It won't be syncronized. So you'll have to get the hang of "double clutching". It's not very hard and will become second nature to you. Just shift slowly. You'll learn that the car will tell you when it's time to move the shift lever. Also, when you change the transmission oil, don't use 90 weight. You'll have trouble shifting it if you do. Go to any of the Ford Model A parts suppliers and get some 600 weight oil. The thick oil helps slow the gears down for the next shift.

All in all, you've got a very dependable 1920's sedan there! Great find. I agree with the rest of the guys. YOu don't need to restore it. Just go over it, clean and lube everything that moves... then enjoy it. Cars from this era are a lot of fun and get a lot of attention. They're much easier to work on than later cars.

If I can be of any help, just e-mail me at bradwallace2000@yahoo.com

I'm in Eastern PA.

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