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Please HELP, Looking for Automotive work in US - how to proceed?


Mika Jaakkola

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Hello,

May I kindly ask your help? My brother (29 years) has decided to get work in automotive industry in US.

Any ideas how to proceed?

He has bachelor's degree in Automotive Engineering(4 years) and is currently working at Nissan Motor Car Companys Nordic European HQ as a Warranty Coordinator.

Anybody know anyone who could help?

Thanks again guys & gals ! Merry Christmas and Happy New Yearto all!!!

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Here's an idea:

In the summer of 2002, we visited three major automobile factories. All three started workers at $22.00 an hour.

We went to the Toyota Plant in Georgetown, KY (near Lexington). It was 1 1/2 million square

foot plant that built all the Toyota Camarys sold in the USA. It was a very clean well run plant with good lighting and A/C. No unions, happy employees, team cross training, child care and a great benefits package .

The employees in this plant had organizers come to form a union. They demanded a vote. Toyota said fine, vote. But if you unionize we'll close this plant and build a new one in Louisiana.

They voted no union. We took a tour of the entire facility, that was led by employee's who earned the right to do a 3 month stint on the tour staff. I spoke with many employees who were all happy and enthusiastic about quality of the car they were building and the Toyota company.

Next we went to the GM plant in Bowling Green KY where they build Corvette's. It was dark, dirty and noisy. The tour was given by retired union employees' who relished in the idea that the union protected them from the company and how the factory was at their mercy. They relished in the game of they (GM) can't make us do anything.

I asked them if anybody at the Corvette plant had driven 150 miles to Georgetown to see how Toyota did it. The scoffed at that idea "Why would we want to do that"?

Next we went to the Ford Plant in Louisville where they made Ford Explorers. It was darker and dirtier than the Corvette plant and felt like the inside of a coal mine. The tour was lead first by retired union people with the same attitude we found in the Corvette plant.

I asked them if anybody at the Corvette plant had driven 50 miles to Georgetown to see how Toyota did it. He scoffed at that idea "Why would we want to do that"? The next part is especially interesting for you new car buyers.

There were 1000's of NO SMOKING signs in the plant, but nobody paid any attention. Even at the end of the production line where the finished Explorers were driven from the automated line to the test dyno room, employee's were SMOKING in the cars! I asked the management tour guide why that was? and he said,

"The company and the union have agreed not to discuss it."

I told him I would refuse delivery of any new car that had been smoked in and he said "Oh well..

So what's the idea? How about some of these American auto workers going to see how the foreign competition has set up their factories to dominate the car business. I went to see it, what's wrong with GM, Ford and Chrysler taking a look too. Might even be a great place to work!

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West, I know, that's too bad. But the situation is not only in US - it's all over the world. frown.giffrown.gif

Paul, I didn't quite get it how your story has an answer to my question, unless you ment that my brother should focus on foreign auto makers in US - without union guys hassling around - Interesting story though!!

Does anyone have any other info I could pass forward?

Thanks again!! grin.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Mika Jaakkola</div><div class="ubbcode-body">........My brother (29 years) has decided to get work in automotive industry in US.........He...........is currently working at Nissan Motor Car Companys Nordic European HQ as a Warranty Coordinator.........</div></div>

One way may be to seek work in the US through his current employer, Nissan.

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