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29 chrysler model 65 roadster help


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Leigh nice orginal car, what I'm looking for is a running board measurement inside length at the side skirt, outside length, and the front width and rear width, and a close up pic of the running board. Also is there a gap under the door, between the side skirt and the body, if so how much, they shimmed the car at each body bolt between the frame and body, what I'm trying to see is how thick the rubber shims are. Mike

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I must stress that this is an Australian built body and may be different to a USA built body.

Running board

width at front fender 335 mm

width at rear fender 230 mm

length at valance 1205

length at outside 1200

These measerments include aluminium strip that runns around the top of running board.

There is a gap under the door which is a small panel that runns between cowl and rear tub, it is an extention of the rolled lip on the bottom of the cowl and rear tub.

No shims or rubber spacers between body and chassis, bolted straight on.

Leigh

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This is interesting, the only fender welt on my car is on the rear fenders. It stops at where the body meets the valance panel. Maybe they run out at the factory? Maybe they only used it on the rear guards because that is the only point where the body could leak? Cost wise when these cars were built, why use it if you didn't have to, that's what I think.

Leigh

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Just an observation...since Dodge Brothers was part of Chrysler by 1929 it is possible that they were built the same. My 1931 Dodge originally had the welting from the front of the splash apron (between the apron and running board) all the way to the rear end of the apron and up around the rear fender. Don't know if the 1929 Dodge had the same configuration.

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I have found that the 20s and early 30s cars are all slightly different every year and model. No one is around now that built them to tell us what is right or wrong and almost all the totaly original cars have been restored because of the easy work to restore them. I'm keeping mine as so I have something to reference while building my other cars and to help others out.

Leigh

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The Australian measurements are identical to mine from what appears to be a NOS US Running Board, give and take a few mm. As regards welting between the running board and fenders, both my two non pre-dismantled Series 65s came with something there. Not enough traces were left to define it as fender welting pure, but on the other hand it would make sense today to put something in between to avoid chafing? I am going for fender welting..

Narve

NORWAY

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The Fisher Body Service manual for these Chryslers at least up to 1931 shows rubber/fabric shims at body mounting points. Photos look like maybe 1/4 inch. Various thickness' are used to align or square up door openings. Manual suggests tightning two turns only after contact to not over compress rubber.

28steve

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