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1970's Barney Pollard Auctions


jeff_a

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A museum In Alaska recently bought a 1912 Peerless at an auction which formerly belonged to the late Detroit car collector Barney Pollard. I've read that he rescued several cars a week from barnyards and scrapyards in the 1930's through the 1960's, including fishing a 1910 Franklin out of a river during a bridge construction project.

Does anyone out there have a list of the cars sold when Mr. Pollard's hundreds of vehicles were auctioned?

Thanks!

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No list from me, but I do remember seeing those cars sitting vertical on their rear bumpers in the mud. They were piggy backed into these warehouses and a good number of them were missing the rear parts from resting in the mud.

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I witnessed the 1st of his auctions (when he was still alive)

the cars were hanging from the rafters and the ones closest to the exterior walls suffered from the elements

unbelievable sight, I wish I had taken tons of pictures ...

<span style="font-weight: bold">Barney stopped the auction after a period of time when he realized they were not bringing what he thought they should</span>*

As I remember, it was cold and rainy the day of that sale

* Memory being what it is, Jim has explained below what happened. I was young and my recollection may have been tainted by crs syndrome, I recall my dad had spoken with him at the time of the sale and Barney was not happy with the results.

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Guest Paul Christ

Here are some articles from "Old Cars" about a fire in one of Pollard's garages in 1976. These articles were found on the Huff Report website ( www.huffreport.com ). This is kind of a fun website to visit, if you've never seen it before.

pollard1.jpg

pollard2.jpg

pollard3.jpg

pollard4.jpg

pollard6.jpg

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I owned one of Barney's cars for awhile. He had driven it at Greenfield Village in 1954. I got to see part of the collection that his daughter owned and it was breathtaking. I got weak in the knees when she opened the door to the massive warehouse.

We are trying to get a story going on Barney & his collection for our magazine. Jim, if you are reading this...we are waiting!

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Guest Jim Dillon

Steve, Just what I need another forum. These forums contain so much good stuff to look at it and look into it is hard to get work done in the shop. I haven't forgotten on an article on my grandfather, Barney Pollard but I have a few things on my plate right now. I started to put a file together so that when I get some spare time I can put something together.

As to the lists of the auctions I am supposed to have a file on that somewhere but apparently it is hiding. When the first auction took place I had just passed the bar and advised my grandfather that the auction should be with reserve. My grandfather though listened to the auction company he hired (a construction company auction group that were clueless). They said to attract the buyers it should be without reserve. The first auction was on an absolutely miserable autumn rainy cold day. Wreckers from the local scrapyards lined up and the auction was not cancelled but half of the cars went for scrap (sixty cars were auctioned and thirty were hauled off on wreckers-a number of them for the minimum bid of $25)). After the auction my grandfather called in the auction company and told them off and then put me in charge of the auctions from that day forward. I titled over 700 cars and also kept the auction book for years. I have had some guys ask me for records but apparently I did a pretty good job of hiding the records. When I least expect it I will probably find them.

Sadly I never took any pictures of the collection (or very few). I always took it for granted. If I wanted to look at the cars I suppose I just went and looked at them. If all of us could turn back the clock we would do things differently and it is no different with the way we looked at "The Yard". We never called it the collection-only "The Yard". A really cool place for a carnut to grow up.

We sold a 1912 Peerless (to California) and a 1911 Peerless (to Texas) by private sale. May have been another as my memory of every car is not reality.-Jim

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Dear keiser31 and Jim Rohn,

It's great to post an old car question on the forum and have people respond who were actually there at Barney Pollard's place 30 or more years ago. The President of the Peerless Club said he was curious about what other Peerless vehicles may have been sold by the Pollards -- having been shown around the place by Barney himself. He recalled seeing a whole building full of brass headlights and crates of high-wheeled bicycles as well as a 1912 Peerless. --Jeff

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Paul Christ and Jim Dillon,

Thank you for sending so much information on Barney Pollards's car collection, including the newspaper accounts. That auction notice sure had a lot of steam cars in it. I counted eight. I also spotted a 1903 Great Smith, built in Topeka, Kansas.

I read in a back-issue of <span style="text-decoration: underline">Antique Automobile </span>that there were four Peerless cars in the Pollard Collection: a 1901 Motorette, a 1911 Touring, a 1911 Limousine, and a 1912 Touring; but that was in 1962. Who knows what he had fourteen years later?

I know it's considered bad form to get up on a soapbox and talk politics here on the D.F. ... but I read a couple of years ago that Barney approached the powers-that-be in Detroit in his later years about finding a home for his antique cars. I think he was wanting to sell or give away the cars so a first-rate antique auto museum could be created in the country's carmaking capitol. I guess what happened was that nothing came of it. Can you imagine what we'd have today if those 700 cars had gone straight into the Packard Building and been made into "The Pollard-Packard Motor Museum" or something along those lines?

-Jeff Brown, Salmon, Idaho

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Guest wk's_olds

I was at Pollard's place in Detroit in the late 60's. I saw all those cars hanging by their front ends from the rafters. A person could barely walk through the buildings. I had a tour of the restoration shop as well. It was an impressive thing to behold! I had no idea that it had been destroyed by fire until reading the account here just now. How sad!!!

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Guest Jim Dillon

As to the cars burned, we lost I believe 110 cars in the fire. The fire was started by a spark from a railroad locomotive that started the grass on fire. A sad thing is one of the guys renting a building saw a small fire and had one of his guys put it out but obviously did a somewhat poor job. Virtually none of the cars were salvageable-maybe a few parts. There were many great cars in the building but we pretty much felt the worst on the two Olivers burned. These were the only two Olivers built I believe (I am going from memory here-which we all know how much that can be worth at times). If I had to throw a dart I would say the Olivers would have been 1906 and maybe 1908- I would have to look thru the records to be sure. My understanding is that a physician named Oliver liked to tinker with cars and built these two cars and patented numerous details on the cars. The one looked like a stage coach and according to my grandfather the best feature although not patented was the no draft windows. The second car had no exposed running boards (steps were tucked in a bit) and had a front opening hood hinged at the cowl. I don't remember all of the patented or unigue features of the two cars but I always liked the one that looked like a stage coach (so did Bill Harrah when he came to visit). There were many rare cars in the building including a Packard Model 30 that I really liked. I remember seeing them fight the fire on the news and It was pretty much toast by the time I got there. The next morning my grandfather was pretty good about it-he took it better than I did. He had them insured with Lloyds of London a few years before but when they dropped the coverage he was pretty much out of options. All in all though there were still around 900ish or so cars left in other buildings. It may seem strange to some but I don't believe any of us really walked thru the collection and counted them-there were just a bunch of cars. We had probably 150 cars restored, semi-restored or half-way decent original with titles and I had to title another 700 for auction and private sale.

As to the museum that was a sad episode. My grandfather bought large tracts of land in Wixom and Novi to build a museum and he worked for years to get approval jumping threw one hoop after another but it never got done-long story. Then in the late seventies my grandfather and I worked with the city of Detroit even meeting them downtown in an old but absolutely grand old bank building with large columns that looked like would be a go. It was a sweet deal for the city and we would supply anywhere from twenty five to seventy five cars if we could make it work. We had other things as well to add to the building but when push come to shove other than a few people like Alex Pollock (the force bringing the old street cars back for nostalgia and some of the restoration of buildings etc), the city had little interest.

As to the Peerless Limousine it is ringing a bell. I owned the 11 Touring and the 12 Touring had been on loan in the Thompson products museum for years-great running car. We had one building in the back with just limos and towncars. There were so many great cars they sadly run together after awhile.-Jim

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Thanks Jim, good to have you over here on the AACA Forum. You mentioned Bill Harrah coming to visit your grandfather. I've often wondered what it was like when he stoped into a collection back in the late 1950's-1960's, he had the pick of some truely great cars. At the time I think he chose the best of the best, did the sellers feel the same way?

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Guest Jim Dillon

Contrary to some stories I have read, my grandfather and Bill Harrah were very good friends. They were both extreme carnuts. Bill Harrah wanted to buy a number of cars and in fact wanted to buy many of the cars in the building that burned in the sixties. I am not sure though of any cars that he did buy until the time that we started to auction off the cars. My grandfather did not sell too many cars early on and not because he was hoarding as some fools claimed, but because he enjoyed the cars and bought each for a reason and felt no compulsion to sell them. He did not buy them to turn a profit and in fact laughed at some of the prices they brought at auction while lamenting the sorry prices he felt for others. He sold an American underslung scout roadster to Gale Winters (think I have his name right) in the fifties and one time at the old car meet at Greenfield Village I told him how much I liked the car and would like to own it and he said "so would I". I spoke to Bill Harrah on a number of occasions regarding cars that he was interested in, and he sent his representatives to our auctions, although I cannot remember how many or which cars he bought although I seem to remember a rare Model Ford for some reason. If he did not buy it he certainly inquired about it as I remember he asked me questions about an early Ford. Whenever we spoke he always was extremely complimentary about my grandfather, so it makes me frown when I hear of stories as to any problems between the two.

Sadly both of these collectors died at pretty much the same time. They both had pretty nice car collections although Bill Harrah had much deeper pockets and the condition and extent of his collection illustrated that quite well-Jim

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jeff_a</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Paul Christ and Jim Dillon,

Thank you for sending so much information on Barney Pollards's car collection, including the newspaper accounts. That auction notice sure had a lot of steam cars in it. I counted eight.

</div></div>I have the Steam car that is in the 3 row, last picture. BJ Pollard stamped in the right front frame rail. Jim has been very helpful to me.

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Thank you for all the information on the Pollard collection.I was going to school at GM Tech in Flint and in 1955 my room-mate and I went to see the collection. I had a 1916 Peerless at the time and heard that he had a Peerless and I wanted to see another one. We met Barney but he was reluctant to let us in, seems that some-one broke into his brass building and stole a bunch of lamps. I showed him my AACA membership and he let us in and showed us where the Peerless was. The cars were parked bumper to bumper and fender to fender, we had to slide over fenders and walk down running bourds to get to the huge Peerless. I think it was a 1912 touring. The engine was very inpressive. As we were climbing back to the Peerless we saw this very large pointed radiator and climbed back to this big SS Mercedes. What a collection, too bad I didn't have my camera. I asked about buying the Peerless but he wasn't interested in selling anything, he said if he sold one of his cars he would be trampled by collectors. He probably knew I couldn't afford it anyway. I watched it go to the sale and I couldn't afford it then either. I still can't.

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Some, perhaps several, of the Pollard cars ended up on flatbed trucks and traveled to Canada's equivalent, the Stan Reynolds collection in Alberta. There are old interesting articles in Vintage Canada newsletters (once supported by the Craven A Foundation) which describe Stan's collecting some of the cars for his collection, including a few rare early Canadian ones.

Stan's collecting history is similar having started out just after WWII with his car and later farm machinery dealership. The collection became legendary in Canada as he searched collected and saved several hundred cars, steam tractors, gas tractors, airplanes and more. I once took a picture of 12 identical Case steam traction engines lined up in one of the storage fields. Fortunatly for Canada, Stan was able to work with the Alberta government which resulted in the Reynolds-Alberta museum which recieved much of his collection (numbering in the 100's) for preservation and presentation. Some day I am going to get to see the new museum as well.

By the way, Stan is still with us and is active restoring vintage aircraft and there are still some old car bits now for sale in his yards.

We can all dream can't we.

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Guest Jim Dillon

Mr Reynolds actually bought a number of the cars. He would spend hours climbing all over the cars. He came prepared with coveralls and was very knowledgeable. A really great guy with a good eye as to collectible cars.

Green Dragon, my real interest is the early racecars. I am a big fan of the Peerless Green Dragon. Do you own an early Peerless of the same era?-Jim

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My oldest Peerless is the 1916 touring that I owned when I met your Grandfather, I also have a 1917 touring, 1919 runabout, and a 1958 Peerless. (that should start some discussion) Peerless started racing in 1902 and stopped racing in 1906. I have a good history of Peerless racing the Blue Streak and Green Dragon. In 1916 Peerless came out with their V-8 engine and Atwater-Kent and a Peerless dealer built a new Green Dragon race car with the V-8 engine. I think they had some help from Peerless but I have nothing to prove that. The car did quite well and won a few races but we entered the war and racing was cancelled. John Hollansworth of Arkansas built a replica of this car.

When our new web page is up there will be a complete section on Peerless racing.

Have a peerless Christmas

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Guest Jim Dillon

Somewhere I have a pic of a Peerless 8 from the teens. Calling any Peerless the Green Dragon in the teens may have been more nostalgic than anything else. If my memory serves me didn't Charles Schmidt leave Packard after the Gray Wolf and go to work on some of the racecars at Peerless?

Will look forward to any website devoted to early racing-Jim

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In 1906 Peerless decided to drop out of racing and compete in reliability tours. Louis Moores who started the Peerless race program and designed the Blue streak and Green Dragon resigned in June 1906, Charles Schmidt was then hired as superintendent and chief engineer. To my knowledge Peerless didn't build another race car after the 1905 Green Dragon, although several independent Peerless owners entered hill climbs and races with their personel cars and Peerless got the credit for some of these. When Peerless stopped racing they sold the Green Dragon and Blue Streak to Barney Oldfield and these are the two cars that Barney used when he started barn storming around the country.

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Ralph Stein said in The American Automobile that there were at least five Green Dragons, from the first two built for the 1905 Gordon Bennett race in Ireland. One of these 80hp cars qualified, but completed only one lap of the race. Stein says they were then remodeled and named for Barney Oldfield's use on dirt tracks; and as he bingled one they would build another better up to 120hp with 6" bore and stroke. One at least had divided shaft drive in a Y to each rear wheel similar to that of Vittorio Jano's P3 Alfa Romeo. (One of these was in Australia last year for Historic Racing at Phillip Island and on display at the Australian Grand Prix at Albert park a few days later). It was interesting to look at this car close up to understand that Jano did this to lower the centre of gravity at the back; and maybe Moors and Oldfield worked out the same trick many years earlier. I gather much of Stein's knowledge probably came from a first-hand source, Ray Gilhooley, who bought one of the cars from Oldfield in 1908; but he wrecked it in racing.

If you look through the past few years HCCA Gazette I think you will see photos of one of the Green Dragons at an event. I think it is owned in CONN.

We must be grateful that Mr Pollard was knowledgable and discerning to rescue and store so many significant cars at a time when their value was generally considered to be merely scrap.

Ivan Saxton

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I love threads like this were so much info on early cars gets out and discussed, so sad to think of all the other info we'll never get from those without computer access. Ray Gihooley raced an Isotta in the 1914 INDY 500, and had a racing manover named after him. A "Gilhooley" was one or several out of controll 360% spins, he wrecked on the 41st lap. He must have raced the chain drive car for quite a while, it is in a 1923 Pottstown Pa. race photo in AACA headquarters. The "Green Dragon" race car may still be in a local collection 20 minutes away from me. The car was originaly restored as a road car by the late Tom Lester and won at Hershey back in the early 1970's. It was later redone as a race car and ran the London to Brighton several times. The third restoration saw it gain the V'd shape radiator. Jim, I've seen both Packard "Gray Wolf's" at Hershey, the one your Grandfather had and the full reproduction built from factory blueprints this past year. The later was a very impressive project, and the fact that the builder/restorer was more that open about the fact was very nice to see. The underslung "Green Dragon" that Oldfield drove is one of my favorite cars from the early era. Merry Christmas! Bob

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Guest Jim Dillon

Ivan, I agree it was in retrospect pretty good that my grandfather saved some of these cars. I have dealt with negative comments over the years but I think it was pretty cool what he did. I once ran across a receipt from a junkyard in Illinois with two cars written on it but it was a bit cryptic in its wording and so I asked my grandfather about it. He had told me the story in part some years prior because I used to drive his 32 Austin Bantam around the yard (truth be told I used to say you could open the door and get out and walk faster). He bought the Austin along with a 1927 Stutz Blackhawk Speedster for $40 for the two. He had gone to see if there were any interesting cars and the guy was ready to cut the two cars up as they had "black titles". Apparently they were supposed to cut cars up for scrap for the war effort and once they were black titled they were not supposed to be go back on the road. The Austin was in really excellent original condition, too nice to cut up and the Stutz was pretty decent as well. The receipt was made up for whatever purpose without specifying either car in any detail. As to the scrap for the war effort, it is a long story but the government wanted all of my grandfather's cars for the war effort but he ended up buying tons of scrap steel and aluminum and went to Washington and cut a deal with the government to save some of his own cars. Some did end up going to the Ford Rouge plant to be melted down. My grandfather told me he filled the better part of the railroad property (several acres)adjacent to "the yard" with scrap he found by scouring areas all around Detroit. Then he built the buildings around the cars standing on their rear bumpers to hide them from air recon missions looking for scrap for the war. By placing them on their bumpers you could put several cars on the same piece of real estate as one on its wheels.

Bob as to the Gray Wolf, I was always disappointed in the way the Gray Wolf came out. The body was fabricated out of house by some bodyman that came highly recommended and I remember the day it came in. My grandfather was terribly disappointed as it simply did not look like the original. After a day or so I suppose he figured they would just finish it with the body as is. Apparently he had too many projects going at that time and he rationalized I suppose.

I have spoken to Ted Davis from Oklahoma City who built the replica of the Gray Wolf, that i have seen and I told him I believe what he has done to be absolutely tremendous. That is what the Gray Wolf should look like and as I told him, someday I would love to see his body joined up with the engine from the car my grandfather did (and is now a part of the Packard Museum).

I agree that the Green Dragon had several incarnations all of which I like. I have a copy of Peter Helck's Green Dragon hanging in my shop. Too bad about Gilhooley-his IF was a great looking and pretty advanced car that has never been given much ink-a shame. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays-Jim

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Jim, I'm sure we all enjoy reading your life story as Barney Pollard's grandson. I think you should write a series of happenings for the Antique Automobile mag. One article wouldn't serve it justice. I've followed your stories on the Journal site too. I remember that you are very busy with your job right now, but we need more stories!

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Merry Christmas Steve! If you can find the long Pottstown race car photo copy the Gilhooley Isotta is to the right of center and he is wearing what looks like a leather football helmet. The number 24 car on the far right is a 1908 Mercedes GP car with a Hisso aircraft V8. This car finished 4th in the first INDY 500 in 1911. I got to sit in it before it went home to Germany for a full 1908 version restoration. Somehow I think it should have been left as is, it sat in a collection in Ohio since the late 1930's.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Steve Moskowitz</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Finally you are right about something! grin.gif Now go back and spend some quality time with your mother-in-law. After all you are her favorite! </div></div>Don't try to tell us you are working today, Ebanezer. As your boss I'm officially telling you to talk Jim into writeing some articles for the AA.

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Our records show that five Green Dragons where built. Two 40 hp cars were built in 1903 for the Gordon Bennett race in Ireland, only one car was taken to Ireland for the race and Louis Moorers drove it. The car had been painted green because the race was in Ireland, however the car was too heavy and they had to strip some things off it to make the weight requirement, the exhaust system was one of the things to go. As a result the car bealched flame out of the four exhaust ports, they said it was like a fire breathing dragon and the name stuck, Green Dragon. Louis didn't do well in the race, he killed the engine at the start and had trouble with the tires peeling off on a sharp curve. He didn't finish the race and said they were out classed by the European cars. He brought the car back and completely rebuilt it. He realized he was outclassed as a race driver and they hired Barney Oldfield to drive for Peerless.

There never was a 120 hp Green Dragon, Moorers did take two 40 hp 4 cylinder engines and tied them together as a straight 8 80 hp race car but it was not successful. Barney totaled the rebuilt Green Gragon at St. Louis in 1904 and a new 60 hp Dragon was built for the 1905 racing season. This was underslunge and had the pointed radiator.This is the car that Barney won most of his records with. A 90 hp Green Dragon was built for the 1906 racing season and won a few races but Peerless didn't renew Barney's contract and June 1906 Peerless stopped racing and they sold the Green Dragon and Blue Streak to Barney.

One of the problems with the history of Peerless is that the Company's records have been lost. There are a lot of stories about Peerless but most are not completely accurate. And a lot of these non-accurate things have been used in other publications about Peerless which clouds the truth. I have been researching Peerless for 50 years and I am trying to write an accurate history about the company by sorting through fact a fiction. It's too bad the factory records have disappeared.

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Guest Nancy DeWitt

Green Dragon-

It sounds like you saw the 1912 Peerless at Mr. Pollard's that we now have in our museum. Do you recall if it was stored vertically? That would make a great story. The car is in beautiful condition, so if it was damaged from being stored on end, someone did a fine job repairing it.

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Guest Jim Dillon

Nancy, I do not believe that the 12 Peerless was ever stored on end. That car spent from the mid fifties into the seventies in the Thompson Products Museum (Crawford)in Cleveland (I have seen the car pictured on postcards from Crawford when the car was there). When it came back from Cleveland I got the car running again and it was a fine car to drive. A Twin Six Packard also came back at the same time and it was easy to understand why Packards and Peerless were so highly regarded. I owned an unrestored 1911 Peerless that I sold to a gentleman from Texas. The 12 Peerless was sold to a collector in California.

Jeff, I have seen some photos of the Glidden Tour but without seeing them again I cannot identify who is who. The big Austin was a massive car that was sold to collectors out east. I owned the 13 Chalmers for sometime and sold it to Matt Browning. A great car could keep up with anything on the freeway. Matt and I spoke several times and he called me after driving it awhile and told me how much he liked the car. My grandfather really liked the car as he worked at Chalmers at the time this car was built. The engine in that car had never been torn down when we owned it. Parts of the interior were original. Paint was redone in the 40s. Had an air starter and in some of the pics you will see it with a Gabriel Horn (which I hated because everyone wanted me to play a tune on it but I was never musically inclined). Don't remember what or where as to the St Louis, although I remember seeing pictures of it.-Jim

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Guest Nancy DeWitt

Jim,

Thank you for the information! The '12 Peerless is a fabulous car and is in good hands with our museum. I can't wait to go for a ride in it and am curious to see if we'll all look like hobbits riding in that huge car. Alas, we won't be hitting the streets in it until it warms up by about 70 degrees here...

Nancy

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Nancy,

The Peerless I saw at Pollards was not stored on end but on all four wheels parked bumper to bumper and fender to fender with other cars. It looked to be complete but not restored. We looked in the building that had cars stacked on end and there may have been a Peerless in there but we didn't go in and it would have been difficult to tell what the makes were.

I was on the 1953 Glidden with my 1916 Peerless, There were close to 400 cars on that tour and the cut off date was 1917, a lot of brass cars. I saw the Peerless Victoria and took pictures of it but I think it was just on display because I didn't see it on the tour. I took a lot of pictures on that tour but my photo skills were not good and most of my pictures are too dark to copy. I had an interesting experience on that tour that I will never forget. We had to drive our cars through the judging area at Greenfield Village. I had just finished restoring my Peerless and was real proud of it although it wasn't perfect but I was 17 years old and wanted it judged. On my way to the judging area a down-pour came and the water ran off the top onto the hood and distributor, I was out and ready to cry. The Ford people came and towed me back to one of their building to dry out for what turned out to be one of the most delightful days of my life. Who was in there but James Melton and his 1909 Rolls, the Ford 999 race car that they were getting ready to run and Pete DePalo who was going to drive it the next day in exibition on the Ford track. What an afternoon for a 17 year old car nut to spend with these people. Late that afternoon we got the Peerless dried out and running but I didn't want to leave. I'll never forget that afternoon. I wasn't disapointed about not being judged because the Ford restoration mechanics went through the Peerless with me and showed me how to improve my restoration. A great day.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jeff_a</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Among the couple of dozen pictures are 3 of your grandfather's autos: a 1903 St. Louis ( with two men in the car, I think ), a 1909 "xc" Austin ( with one man in the car, I think ), and Christine Pollard in a 1913 Chalmers. It is: www.jumpingfrog.com . </div></div>This website does not work. I would like to see the 09 Austin.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Tom Laferriere</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jeff_a</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Among the couple of dozen pictures are 3 of your grandfather's autos: a 1903 St. Louis ( with two men in the car, I think ), a 1909 "xc" Austin ( with one man in the car, I think ), and Christine Pollard in a 1913 Chalmers. It is: www.jumpingfrog.com . </div></div>This website does not work. I would like to see the 09 Austin. </div></div>

Wonder if it is the same as the brown & white monster that was at Hershey this year?

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Jim, here is a photo of your Grandfather in the 1913 Chalmers on the 1950 Glidden Tour. That is quite a horn, never seen another like it. My 1912 Ford Touring was on the same tour, then owned by Elmer Bimus, restoration was finished the week befor the Glidden started. The car still has that 1950 restoration and looks good from across the street, I arrived in 1950 and the same can be said of me.

post-31159-143138030164_thumb.jpg

post-31159-143138030166_thumb.jpg

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Guest Jim Dillon

Bob, Thanks for the pic of the Chalmers. That was really a great driving car. We never had a problem with the mechanicals on that car. A big six (with 54 hp if I remember correctly). One time the air starter developed an air leak and I was at the Old Car Festival at Greenfield Village. I was with my first wife that could do little more than look pretty and so it was a ritual crank starting it with retarding and cranking and then running and advancing the spark. I got the car started and this guy is waving to me to get out of the car and so I go up to him and ask him what does he want and he asks me if I can turn the car off and do it all over again because his wife missed it the first time. I told him to catch me the next time as I was heading down to the judging field as my number had been called but also cranking was often necessary but I rarely whistled while I was doing it. It wasn't too bad crank starting it but I had a few of the cars give me a jab once in awhile (mainly because they had not been started in awhile I suppose).

The only thing I have left from the Chalmers is the 1913 Michigan porcelain license plate (I have 2 of them in sequence) and I think I have a key fob. I sold the Gabriel Horn to a friend in California (he had to have it). As I said though I would never have another because as I said people wanted you to play a tune and it had a keyboard but it was easier said than done. They kept saying play a tune-if you didn't they would almost boo you.

As to the Austin I cannot think of many nicer cars that came in size large. We had an Olds Limited that was never quite done but the Austin was a site to behold and a good driving car as well.-Jim

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