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54 mercury monterey coil spring removal


Guest 54 merc

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Guest 54 merc

The engine is in the car. After i put the car on jack stands should i take the ball joints loose.The font of the control arm is broke off the crossmember but i dont know if it will drop far enough to let the spring out. I took the coil spring out of my 69 mustang with no problem but on the 54 merc it dosnt look like i can get a spring compressor on the spring.

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If the arm is loose from the frame i would do it the way i said. If the spring doesn't drop out then loosening the ball joint is the required way, but that could be dicey with the other end of the arm disconnected. Do be real carefull there is a lot of stored energy in that spring.

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Guest simplyconnected

Are you going to change the #1 crossmember? I changed mine. it's very common for the bottom to rust out completely, then the rest goes to hell. If you have a cutting torch and a stick (or MIG) welder, you can purchase a new one for about $300 (free shipping) on eBay and do the job in your driveway. (You can't drive the car the way it is.)

NEW 1954 Mercury #1 Crossmember

I bolted the lower "A" arms to the new crossmember before I welded everything in place. The job turned out really nice and solid.

I set the car on jackstands with a scissors jack under the ball joint. First, I used a spring compressor on one side of my '55 Ford. On the other side, I simply disconnected the sway bar, shock, and lower ball joint, then lowered the "A" arm. The spring fell right out under NO pressure. The spring easilly goes back in the same way, using no spring compressor.

While you have all that out, you might want to change your eight urethane bushings and four ball joints. I splurged and got four new springs, a new 1-1/8" front swaybar, and added a swaybar in the rear. Sure makes a big difference in ride with new sway bars, front and rear. That skinny 1/2" thing that came on the car was useless.

Suspension work is not for the faint-hearted. It requires the most taxing labor of your whole car (especially leaf springs). The bolts and nuts are huge, and you need to re-use most of them (you can't just torch them off). Lots of good penetrating oil, finesse, large & DEEP sockets and box wrenches, and bull work, will get you there. I'm a big guy (able to torque 1/2" bolts in half). Whoever does suspension work earns his money.

Hope this helps. - Dave Dare

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Guest 54 merc

I purchased a crossmember off ebay the other day. I had alot of trouble getting the front bumper off alot of rusted bolts. I planed on rebuilding the Suspension when I get crossmember back in. Thanks for all your post I am glad I found this web site.

Jed

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Guest simplyconnected

You got a new crossmember? Great, Jed! All those original bolts are fine thread and a pain to remove. PB Blaster from your auto parts store works well. Hey Jed, take lots of pictures, at least ten before you start your job, and a few more along the way. You'll be glad you did, later on.

You caught what I said, right? If you leave your suspension the way it is, you can support the "A" arms in the front, and pull the bolts out of your old crossmember. Then torch your old crossmember out of your frame and off the two gussets. Don't try to save the old one. If it's easier to take it out in pieces, do it.

Slide the new #1 crossmember in place, and bolt the "A" arms back into it before you weld it in place. Then, the new crossmember should be in the same place the old one was because your ball joints and #2 crossmember (under the engine) are already attached to your "A" arms, making this the THIRD point of attachment. It's a good idea to put the shim washers back in before you weld it up. You really won't need them, but I like to leave the adjustment factor in place for possible future use.

After you have your new crossmember done, you can put a jack under the separated ball joint and lower it, releasing the spring. I wouldn't do this without the "A" arm bolts in place.

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Guest 54 merc

If I jack the car up and put jack stands under the frame and the front of both control arms. Will there be a lot of pressure from the springs or will the motor hold them down. It sounds like your way will be easier to keep the new cross member in the right place. I think I am going to have to replace the bolt on the side that rusted out. Do you know who I can order one from?

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Guest simplyconnected

I put a jack stand under four corners of my frame because I changed all four of my springs. Then, I used a scissors jack under one "A" arm, and a floor jack under the other. I only took the tension off the 1" bolts in the front, so I could pull them out. They came out easier than I thought they would. It was harder to get the nut off.

Those bolts are readilly available. Once in a while I see them on eBay, but the "stores" have them, too:

Ford54-56FrontSuspensionSmall.jpg

** <span style="font-family: 'Arial Black'">FOR A LARGER IMAGE CLICK HERE </span>**

3057 - Bolt, Front Suspension Lower, Mounting (5/8"x 6-1/4") <--that's just the threads. The bolt is at least an inch in diameter.

They aren't cheap. Tee-bird wants $31.95+shipping just for the bolt:

TEE-BIRD.COM

Mac's Antique Auto Parts wants to sell the whole kit at $99.95+shipping:

MAC'S ANTIQUE AUTO PARTS

I suggest you buy the bushing kit (8 pieces). Ball Joints come in kits of four, too. Kits are cheaper and they include those little cupped washers (rubber and steel), etc., in the joint kit. Don't forget the Bumper Kit (for both upper and both lower arms). Hope this helps. - Dave

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Guest simplyconnected

Oh, yeah... After you get the #1 crossmember in, you can lower the "A" arm at the ball joint with a scissors jack. If you have the car up far enough, the "A" arm will release the spring with NO TENSION. It will drop right out. Put it back the same way. By using one, I found out you don't need compressors. Changing springs goes a whole lot faster without compressors.

While the arms were down, I pulled them out and changed ball joints, bushings, rubber bumpers, springs, and stabilizer bar. I also retrofit 11" disc brakes, and got rid of those drums because now I have Power Brakes. A HUGE percent of this job is clean-up. Assembly goes rather fast. If I had it to do over, I'd do exactly the same.

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Guest simplyconnected

I found spindles from an old Granada. An eBay seller in Florida offered them for $200. Everything was there including the proportional valve and a "how to Swap Spindles" CD. I took it all apart and it cleaned-up very nicely, including the pistons. For $5, a local brake rebuilder sold me new piston seals. They look and work like they came on the car from the factory. At first, I was worried that, Granada spindles might be lighter-duty. They are actually beefier than the originals, but disks are lighter than drums, cheaper than drums, and a lot easier to find pads & rotors, for. This was a great move. The original 15" wheels fit just fine, and cover everything.

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Guest 54 merc

That’s cool I did not know that the Granada brakes would fit on the older mercury’s and fords. I put Granada disc brakes on my 69 mustang and it was pretty easy. The only thing I am finding out about the mercury is that the parts are harder to find and they cost more. Do you know of a web site that has an interchange list for mercury’s and ford cars?

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Guest simplyconnected

I don't know of an interchange site per se, but the sites that sell this stuff are EXPENSIVE!!! They also want to sell a 2" lowered spindle. I kept mine stock.

From the exploded-view drawing, you can see your Mercury parts are the same as Ford and Thunderbird (Canadian and Australian Ford and Merc too). Once you find the Granada (disk) spindles they are nearly identical to your stock '54-56 drum spindles. The only modification I did was to open the bottom tapered hole a little bit for the stock '55 ball joint. I did it in a regular old drill press, and kept checking depth with a '55 ball joint. Tendency is to take off too much, but the taper depth difference is only about 1/4" deeper or so. (I understand the Lincoln Versailles spindles are correct and don't need the bottom hole opened.)

I'm using stock '55 ball joints, stock '55 tie rod ends, stock wheels & tires with NO special adapter plates or extended lug studs.

Here is the PDF file that explains the conversion very well:

Mustang and Granada Brake Spindle Conversions.

The guy that wrote the PDF didn't know these spindles fit 1950's Fords, but they do. Yes, as parts become older they are much harder to find (and become more expensive). Having said that, eBay still sells them every week:

Yet another Granada spindle set for sale on eBay

He's running this item until the end of 2008 for $300 (minus rotors and a proportioning valve). It makes sense to buy rotors locally. If you buy new rotors, have a machine shop take .015" off the snout if you run stock wheels. I had mine done for $15. That's how desperate work is, here. - Dave

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  • 3 months later...

Hi there simplyconnected I know this is a old post but could you give me a list of what I would need piece by piece to convert my 54 mercury over to disc I would really appreciate it THANKS so much!

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