D Bosco

Radiator Core fabricators

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Can my fellow hobbyists recommend a fabricator to make a new honeycomb radiator core for a 1907 era car? It measures about 16 inches high, 22.5" wide and 4" deep. I have the person who can replace the core using the original tanks, which are in good condition. You can email me privately at don@tallcoil.com. Thanks,

Don

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There is a radiator re-core specialist in New Zealand with a very good reputation if you cannot find a local supply

http://www.replicore.co.nz/

David

1923 Metallurgique

1931 Rolls royce Phantom Continental

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I had a beautiful honeycomb core made for my grandfather's 1933 Chrysler by a guy on Staten Island. I have no recollection of his name, but his shop was in a temporary worksite trailer. We were reluctant to leave the radiator with him, but he came highly recommended. This was about 15 years ago, maybe ask around.

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Steve - was that Thomas Brothers? Unfortunately they are long gone. They specialized in early aircraft radiators. They were across the Island from me. Too bad I didnt apprentice with them one Summer to learn the art!

Thanks,

Don

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I believe that all honeycomb cores available today come from Vintage Wings and Radiators in England regardless who you buy them from. We used to use a place in NY on one of the islands until we realized that his prices were always exactly to the penny 100% higher than the same core from Vintage Wings and Radiators. We have used at least 8 cores from them and reccommend them highly. Call the other guys, if they cannot give you a price immediately it's likely because they need time to phone Vintage for the current price.

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Hi

Dick Runion of Tiffin Ohio made the radiator for our Packard Twin Six. Very nice job.

He got the core from New Zealand.

At the time, he was less than satisfied with the cores from England. The fellow had sold the business to new owners.

Good luck,

Bill Boudway

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Thanks everyone for your recommendations. I used Vintage Wings and Radiators in the UK with excellent results, a fair price and speedy delivery. I recommend them highly!

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HELLO EVERYONE. My name is Dany Nunez, My father and I owen a radiator shop in NY. He has been in the business for over 25 years and I have been in the business for 10 years. Our Company Jellinek Radiator has been around since 1910. Alot of you guys can relate to that when it comes to old cars. Just give us a call and will help you out with any of your Cooling System Probems that you guy have. We are located in Long island city, NY.

Just call (718) 937-3783(we-serve)

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"I believe that all honeycomb cores available today come from Vintage Wings and Radiators in England regardless who you buy them from. "

This may not be absolutely correct. Len Southward had a business making all sorts of metal tubing for decades in New Zealand; and through his expertise in this made his own cartidge tube and end-forming tooling, and made radiator cores for his own extensive collection of very old and notable cars. In due course he disposed of this activity to a friend. it is almost certain to be the same origin.

In the 1960's-70's, there was a crowd callded Kingdon Tubes (or similar) making radiator tube in Tralee in Republic of Ireland. They disappeared back into Germany promptly when whatever EEC subsidy that caused them to relocate to the emerald isle expired.

About the same time in Sydney, an older solo operator, a Mr Johnson in Parramatta Rd made whatever film core radiator anyone needed as needed. They were ecxcellent and very reasonable, with a core for an 8cyl Stutz or similar costing around $100. The man to whom he sold the business made 4 or 5 cores for me for my Mercers and those of friends for around $300. The next owner was an entrepreneur who few people would deal with.

There is another way you can get around making cartridge tubes for a core at home, if you are earnest about it. During the war in Melbourne, Chamberlains made honeycom radiators for some aircraft application. They made a casing die for the correct internal dimensions of the tubes, and electroplated copper on the outside of the little Woodsmetal castings they made in the die. They recovered the woodsmetal to be re-cast by using a hot water bath. (Woodsmetal is a peculiar eutectic alloy which has an extremely low melting point).

I would be grateful if someone could point me in the direction of critical information on the impact press extrusion of cartidge tube. I have a suitable press, and I could make the dies.

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Harry & Sons Radiator Rosemead Ca, (626)288-0644 In Business for 80 years Family owned and operated does work for the Nethurcutt collection, Jay Leno,and many more. Alex. and if you want a piece of junk radiator buy a Brassworks we repair them all the time there life span is about 5 years.

Edited by A1915dodge (see edit history)

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On 5/6/2011 at 3:26 PM, A1915dodge said:

Harry & Sons Radiator Rosemead Ca, (626)288-0644 In Business for 80 years Family owned and operated does work for the Nethurcutt collection, Jay Leno,and many more. Alex. and if you want a piece of junk radiator buy a Brassworks we repair them all the time there life span is about 5 years.

Wow.

 

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On 5/6/2011 at 3:26 PM, A1915dodge said:

Harry & Sons Radiator Rosemead Ca, (626)288-0644 In Business for 80 years Family owned and operated does work for the Nethurcutt collection, Jay Leno,and many more. Alex. and if you want a piece of junk radiator buy a Brassworks we repair them all the time there life span is about 5 years.

What type of repairs are you making on these? 

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On 7/9/2020 at 6:50 PM, mikewest said:

Brassworks. Why don't you respond to this statement?  Ive seen your rads and they look great! 

Mike
I don’t know how to respond to this kind of statement.  I’m somewhat surprised to see it posted on this forum and I suppose it speaks to the state of our society; I just hope it is not the future direction of the hobby.
 

 

 

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Brassworks has been in business for a very long time. I have never heard any disparaging comments about their work. I had them custom-make a gas tank for me last year and the work was excellent. 

 

The internet is a great place to take unfair pot-shots at people and businesses. 

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Bear in mind that comment is 9 years old from a guy who hasn't been on this site in nearly 6 years.

 

It's hard to police internet comments and it's frustrating for a vendor. Anonymous pot-shots are difficult to defend because it only looks like you're trying to cover your ass at that point. I try to always remember that the complainers inevitably end up on the internet with an axe to grind and will usually dramatize the situation to make it seem even worse than it is. The people who are happy with the vendor likely outnumber the complainers by a significant margin, but if they're happy they don't go online to talk about it unless specifically asked. The complainers will complain via every outlet they can find, which, of course, magnifies the problem, as do the anecdotal hangers-on who will now say, "Well, I heard X was junk from a guy on the message forum."

 

And for what it's worth, the complainers are usually people with unreasonable expectations who don't even give a company a chance to make things right before lighting the torches. They just want to fight and usually the complaint comes back to price--the "defect" is just a lever designed to move the price in their favor even after they've got the product.

 

That's my experience, anyway.

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