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  • 7 months later...

Hi guys.

Have been remiss in documenting my engine building progress. And I know everyone is waiting with bated breath for an update. Well, it is almost ready to install!!

I believe I know the answer to the following question, but will ask anyway. What is the proper procedure for finding #1 firing position when installing the distributor?

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Edited by Ben Bruce aka First Born (see edit history)
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Look at timing mark on flywheel or flex plate. Rotate reciprocating assy until #1 piston is at Top Dead Center (TDC) coming up on compression stroke. Both valves will be closed when the spark plug fires. Going past TDC the #1 cylinder is in the power stroke mode due to rapidly expanding gases, the spark plug having ignited the fuel-air mixture.

Note: some engines are timed for ignition a few degrees BTDC, also called advance. Such activity allows more efficient ignition of the fuel air mixture. In two revolutions of the crakshaft (720 degrees) a piston completes 4 cycles: intake, compression, power, exhaust. In certain engines you'll notice there's overlap (both valves open during on of the strokes). It's common for the intake valve to open BTDC exhaust stroke. The cool dense fuel-air mixture facilitates scavenging of the hot exhaust gases out of the cylinder and allows a greater amount of said mixture to be sucked into the cylinder on the intake stroke. This is one of the reasons there's unburnt fuel in the exhaust system. Another reason is reciprocating gasoline fueled engines can only achieve about 30% effeciency from the fuel air mixture. Diesel engines are much more effecient, with gas turbines achieving a higher effeciency than a diesel.

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I like starting at the bottom with the crank and bearings. Plastigage to make sure. Find a new neoprene rear seal as opposed to the rope. Get the crank in then pistons and rings. Cover the connecting rod bolts with tubing to make sure you dont scratch any thing.

Again plastigage to measure. Make sure you use lots of assembly lube. Everything should turn easy at all times.

Make sure you have a good Torque wrench, spend the money, it will last a long time.

Oil the threads of bolts, its the only way to know for sure.

Now to the cam timing gears and front cover. Then the oil pump and pan.

Valves and rocker arms etc. then the head goes on.

Now all the extras.... I like to fill the engine with oil and spin the oil pump with a drill to make sure all the plugs are in before putting it in car.

Sounds easy... This is my way, maybe not the best but it works for me.

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  • 1 month later...

Well, the rebuilt 248 RUNS. Not very long as the radiator is yet to be installed. But she starts right up.

Now I am working on the front clip, sanding, painting, etc. The previous owner had sprayed entire car with rattle can primer to combat surface rust. Some rust showing again. I am sanding these areas to bare metal. Should I sand off all the primer on the rest of the car down to good paint, or will sanding to smooth the primer suffice? Am not going for a "judged" car. Just want to hear your ideas.

Thanks

Ben

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  • 5 months later...

If you use the "Manage Attachments" tool, you get the thumbnails and can't put comments between. To do that, you would need to use the IMG tags and have the photos posted on the Internet at a site like PhotoBucket or Flickr. There is a sticky post at the top of the Me and My Buicks forum that should explain it.

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  • 2 months later...

Well, here it is ,two months later. Car coming home from paint shop in a couple of days. I hope!

I have a request for someone with a parts book or other knowledge. Are the windshields for my mod 41 same or different than for a mod46.

Some views before and after. These are the best of the old floors. Metal termites had done their job. New ones look much better!

Trunk floor just needed cleaning and painting.

All I can do. On the way to paint shop.

Will have after paint views soon.

Ben

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I have gone back and reread the thread "No oil filter 47 Roadmaster", in which Dave Corbin explains filter installations and colors for east/west. But missing, unless I missed it, is an explanation for the blue can, orange top. Dave says the dealer installed one is orange can/blue top.

Does any one have factory or dealer engine bay pictures? Or a completly orignal car with pictures available. Interested in the 1950.

Thanks

Ben

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  • 2 weeks later...

Tuesday May 18.

He is ready for the upholstrey shop. Goes tomorrow!

And I did say HE. Decided to call him George, after my dad. He dearly loved Buicks. Started helping Dad when I wa twelve, on his 1932.

Still some parts to replace as time and budget {ya right, } allow. But he will be in Ames, under his own power.

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Edited by First Born
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  • 2 weeks later...

Well , it is Wednesday, June 2nd. We are still having trouble getting the windshield to install. It acts as if it is to big. Have checked with others on here, and it seems to be correct. Can the new rubber gasket/weather striping be wrong? Has any one else had a similar problem? Any ideas and help will be appreciated.

Thanks

Ben

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This has been one INTERESTING thread!

Regarding David's comments on crankshafts . . . there seem to be a decreasing number of crankshaft grinding operations. Some old-line "embedded" machine shops usually had their own machines, but many now send them out to a local operation. The crank might be machined "to spec" in all respects, but it appears that "fillets" might not be cut to specs in many cases. It seems that some shops don't address this area of the operation, by observation, even "the better shops". Also something that can be overlooked when the crank comes back all shiney and "cut".

It's my understanding that the fillet radius and depth is there to remove stress risers which might be in the casting and to help prevent cracks. As beefy as the older inline engines' cranks were, considering the weight vs. power output of the stock engine configuration, this might not be nearly as critical as it would be in a high-rpm race engine.

Usuallly, a "factory balance set" of pistons will be "to spec", weight wise, when compared to aftermarket replacement pistons (which do not have to be of the same weight as the factory pistons were . . . usually a little heavier). Same for connecting rods. My machine shop operative would purchase used engines to rebuild for this reason . . . compare the balance pad on the rod to that of a new, factory-supplied replacement rod and you'll see how different it can be. This used engine generated a matched-set of rods with a matching balance crankshaft.

In "balancing" an engine, there are certain relationships which need to exist between the weights of the piston/rod assembly and the counterweights on the crankshaft. As mentioned, it's a good idea to make things as light as you can, within boundaries. Less weight "slinging around" in there means more power to the flywheel. It might be a small increase, just as throttle response (not in gear) should increase a little, but it's there. Then there's "over-balance" and "under-balance", which can relate to the engine rpm where the maximum smoooothness is desired--for what it's worth.

Back to crankshaft machining issues . . . How did the final crankshaft come out? How much did they have to cut to get things where they needed to be? Just curious.

In the world of "racing engines", which can also be applied to stock-spec engines, there are a few tricks that can be used to save a crank, sometimes. One is "offset grinding", such that the rod journals are cut slightly off-center for a little longer stroke length. Usually, this would require some different size rod bearings and also would have some very strict limits it could be done within.

Related to the crankshaft, getting an engine "line honed" prior to other machine work (which will center off of the crankshaft centerline), with the rod caps being "filed" as necessary, ensures that the newly-machined crank will spin smoooothly and easily when everything's assembled. Getting this done can ALSO take care of any "special fittings" of main bearings when the engine was originally built at the factory . . . which means all of the replacement bearings should all fit better. As with power-honing cylinder walls, it takes an experienced machinist to perform this labor operation . . . as only a minimum of metal needs to be removed . . . if too much, it can't be put back.

The other thing is that as a "green" block is cured with repeated hot/cold run cycles, it will "take a set" that will agree with the other parts as they all "mate" together during break-in. Machining on a "cured core" results in no movement of the casting with respect to machined clearances. For this reason, "break-in" of a rebuilt engine doesn't need to be as long as it would be for a new engine.

The "variable speed/variable loac" break-in procedure is there to "load" both sides of the rotating assembly's moving parts. "Power" loads one side of the pistons and thrust bearing, "coast" loads the other sides, for example. "Coast" is also supposed to ensure that lubrication is pulled "up" by manifold vacuum, on the cylinder walls, initially, to make sure that area is lubricated sufficiently . . . at least that's what I recall reading "years" ago.

There are a few variations fo the variable speed/load orientation. One is to start with smaller acceleration times (from lower rpm to higher rpm, under power) and then increase the "power" times as more run time takes place. Some prefer to do it all in the same session, whereas others might desire to do things a little more gradually. Your judgment call . . . but starting with a cured block would mean that it basically means that as soon as the rings seat, if there are no other operational issues, then it's done.

Another consideration would be how much clearance is on the piston skirts-to-cylinder walls. If it's more toward the "tight" side of the spec or if it's more toward the "upper" side of the spec. Tighter clearances would typically mean more run time before you attempt any WOT, top speed, extended power activities. One way you might monitor this would be how freely the engine might rev (out of gear) and if the water temperature might decrease a little with accumulated run time. Several things to pay attention to . . .

In general, there are a lot of things which race engine builders can do to enhance the operation of stock engines. They might not make a really big difference, but if you know what you're looking at (for example), you'll see that things are just a little nicer than they might otherwise be.

Good luck and keep us posted!

NTX5467

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Thank you, 5467.

The headliner is in and carpet almost complete. Hopefully another week will see him home.

Still having problems getting the windshield in. Let me rephrase that. We are unable to get the windshield in. Called CARS and asked about the gasket and they put me in touch with Steele. Upshot was to send the gasket back and they will send another. Sent. Hope the replacement comes soon and all ends well.

Does any one know if Missouri had one or two license plates in 1950? And does any one have any for sale?

Thanks

Ben

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  • 5 months later...

Boy, a long time since updating this thread. I just let it languise.

I will not try to relate everything that has happened here. Just say that the old boy runs and drives well. Made the trip to Ames and back with no problems. I am very proud of that.

As it gets closer to winter, decided to get the heater, etc, working. Had the temp controller rebuilt. Installed new hoses. The heater and defroster cores had been checked out and certified OK earlier. Installed , at the source, shut off valves in the water lines. Everything together, but no heat. Fought this problem for a week!! Pulled hoses. OK. Checked cores. No problem! What is stopping the water?

Yesterday, decided to pull the water pump. Hate that job! Back of my hand looks loke ground meat from rubbing on the radiator. Anyway, found the problem. I don't know about V8s or other years straight 8s, but the water pump on mine has a bypass inside that allows for water circulation until the thermostat opens. The heater return must pass through this bypass, back to pump inlet, for circulation. The bypass was plugged solid. I had the pump professionally rebuilt, but failed to check the bypass. Heck, I didn't know about it. Had to probe around with an icepik to find it and start an oprning. Followed up with drill bits until opening is clear. First pic shows a pinprick of light after the icepick first broke througfh. Second one is after clleaning. View is through the hose connection from thermostat housing to pump. Heater return enter to the left in the first picture, and flows through the now open orfice in the second back to pump suction. Long post, but there it is!!

Ben

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Edited by First Born (see edit history)
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Its great to see another 4dr being restored. I just bought a 4dr Super that has had a lot of $$$ spent on it, but the floor pans were just patched with sheet metal, nothing welded. However, the door panels and seats were professionaly done. Paint is a 10 ft'er. The person I got it from couldn't get it running. Since I have owned 3 of these '50's I knew it would run. A new condensor and set the points and yes she runs and ready for the next owner. You have put yours back together for the next care taker to enjoy when that time comes. If you ever get into Arkansas drop me a line and we can line our 50's up.

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Oldwood, thanks for the invite. If you are up Springfield way, get in touch. Even if you are not in your '50. I just like to talk BUICKS. Especially '50 Buicks.

Ben

By the way, I am still looking for source for torque ball reseal kit. Standard tranny. Any one any idea??

Ben

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Thanks Ben for the invite. I just put new www on my '50 this week. Most of the car clubs in Central Arkansas are gathering this Saturday for the "Toys for Tots" car show at the Zoo in Little Rock. Probably the last big show for the year. My 1st '50 I bought a couple of years ago here in LR. It was a 1 owner car and is listed in my "images". However, I sold it when my current '50 came up on ebay with a fair BIN price. Do a search "My new baby blue '50 pics" to see what I replaced my 1st '50 with. I'll send ya a PM with my # in case your down this way. Happy Holidays to you and yours. ---Dorsey

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  • 2 months later...

Hi guys, been a while sinc posting on this thread. But I have a question.

There have been discussions, comments, and so forth,[ one of Dads favorite expressions] about replacing gears and or rearends in our older Buicks with higher speed units from newer ones. My question-- Is it normally done by swaping out the ring gear and pinon or is the entire thing swaped. And what is the latest that will swap into my '50?

I am pulling mine to reseal the torque ball. What better time to swap.?

Thanks

Ben

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  • 2 weeks later...

The rear ends in the Buicks will interchange through 55. I have a 3.42 in my 40 and LOVE it

If the drive shaft ane torque tube are different lengthes, install yours on the cast iron pig , and bolt it in. This way you do not have to worry about gear lash, unless the unit you are installing is not too good.

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..... My question-- Is it normally done by swaping out the ring gear and pinon or is the entire thing swaped. And what is the latest that will swap into my '50?

I am pulling mine to reseal the torque ball. What better time to swap.?

Thanks

Ben

Ben

The entire thing is swapped meaning the chunk or pumpkin...just attach to your axle housing. Use your axle shafts and driveshaft.

55 is the latest for this swap with available ratios of 3.6:1, 3.36:1 and 3.41:1...and of course some obscure high ratios used for export and standard transmission. Other years may have different choices.

Willie

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  • 9 months later...

Had to replace the exhaust manifold and valve body. Found a good one, thanks to some help from you guys. BUT I had to dissamble dut to a bad gasket between the valve body and exhaust manifold. Broke some studs. No surprise, really. Had them drilled out at a machine shop. Today started reassembly. Discovered the threads in one hole in manifold will not let the stud tighten. They are still there, just "oversized".

So now what. I can think of several paths, but not sure which is best. Open to advise from some of you who has had this problem.

Thabks

Ben

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  • 6 years later...
  • 1 year later...
  • 3 weeks later...
On 12/8/2008 at 6:57 PM, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

I am about ready to order parts for my rebuild. Would like to hear from others as to their ideas on the best places to buy. Looks like a rebore of .020. The crank is not worn too bad, but has .008 runout in the center. Looks like the head will be ok with out any thing major.

 

 Bumping for review.

 

  Thanks

  Ben

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Well it has been a while since posting anything in here.  So Reviving?

 

  Back in Sept I advertised for a transmission.

   In Feb I advertised for gears.  I was encouraged to repair the transmission myself.  ME?  Never have done so. I am intimidated!  

 

  So now the rest of the story.

         

         I DID IT!

 A couple weeks or so back , I pulled the transmission. About the same time Neil and crew pulled his. That bugger  just sat there on the work bench, mocking me.  For a WEEK.  Finally, when Don and crew dissembled Neil's, I took the plunge.   Piece of cake!    Two gears were pitted some . Pete had one.  Other is not too bad and did not seem to have damaged the gear  it meshed with. Remember the reason for this repair?   IT GROWLED and HOWLED.  A LOT.   Discovered , after checking. And checking again.  The rear bearing is rough.  While searching for gears, someone had given me the name of Dennis Maroudas.  I found him .   DME  LLC in Forest Hills, KY.  He had the bearing! Also a synchronizer.  Third gear one was badly worn.

  After a couple of missteps, it all went back together.  Today, I managed to get EVERYTHING buckled up.   BY MYSELF!   Drove George down the road a ways, three miles or so , and return. Nice and quiet.  No  howling. And can't MAKE third clash.   HAPPY. HAPPY

 

  Thanks to all who encouraged me to tackle this.

 

  Ben

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I love a success story. Glad to know things went well, Ben. One of these years I will probably have to tackle the transmission in my '52 when the time comes. No time soon, I have too many projects ahead of it.                                                                                                                                                Mark

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