Jump to content

Old Car Mechanic in NE Wisconsin area?


Guest Fr Mike

Recommended Posts

Guest Fr Mike

I have been looking for a knowledgeable mechanic familiar with old cars to do some work on my 1931 Buick and 1936 Plymouth. . . . in the northeast Wisconsin area (I live in Green Bay).

Any recommendations?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest simplyconnected

I don't have an answer for you, but it amazes me that NONE of the new mechanics know enough about cars to work on old, conventional cars. Same thing happened with the family I bought my '55 car from in Missouri; nothing was fixed and they said they couldn't find a mechanic. I just assumed it was a "locality" thing, but here we are again. Certainly this can't be happening all over, can it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The answer is they are not taught to do that type of work anymore , if you cant plug in a diagnostic machine or computor to it to tell you what is wrong and how to fix it they dont want to know you. the same goes with a lot of the newer body shops not many now how to repair a panel , nowadays the just fit new ones

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest palosfv3

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: elmo39</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The answer is they are not taught to do that type of work anymore , if you cant plug in a diagnostic machine or computor to it to tell you what is wrong and how to fix it they dont want to know you. the same goes with a lot of the newer body shops not many now how to repair a panel , nowadays the just fit new ones </div></div>

The mechanical/body repair of an old car is basic automotive knowledge which is taught to all entering the trade. I believe your statement should be is that they are unknowledgeable of where and how to source the parts and info needed to repair . Todays mechanical/body repair industry is set up on a " get it done by the end of the day " model which is demanded by todays driving public. Inserting the restoration/repair of an old car into the system designed to repair todays cars amounts to driving a square peg into a round hole. There are many young talented persons in todays shops that have the desire to learn all they can about the the auto repair industry both past and present and metal working /technical skills and information are being taught and passed on at an unprecedented rate due to todays internet society.

Many of the parts on todays cars are not repairable due to design and structural requirements and as such metal repair as it was known has changed from what it used to be. This is not the fault of the tech. When non repairable boron steel is used in the structural backbone of the auto, the knowledge of how to repair is at a much higher level than when the cars were made of the low grade metals of the past. Painters must replicate a roboticly applied finish that is unparalleled in automotive manufactoring history . Todays techs are the most knowledgeable and highly trained that have ever been employed by the industry.

Yes, we have good and bad in the auto shops just like every other industry. The old car business has benefitted from these changes . New repair techniques, materials and equipment, can be utilized in the restoration effort and as such has made a tremendous impact of the quality of todays work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest simplyconnected

I bought an '55 Ford and nothing electrical worked, except it ran (started and idled). Looking under the dash, there was no fuse box (it didn't come with one), but I saw wire-ends dangling in space. I soon realized these were in-line fuseholders that the polymers baked out of over time, and they simply fell apart. Sounds simple enough, right? When I replaced the fuse holders, everything started working again.

This isn't rocket science. The owners simply could not find a mechanic in Missouri that could fix old cars, consequently, nothing got done. That's why I got the car so cheap.

Basic elementary back yard mechanics fixed these electrical problems, not a Fluke 88 or a decoder. Nobody needed to know where or how to source parts or info on how to repair.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest tcuda340

Hard to believe no one in the entire state of Missouri doesn't know how to work on an old car! Must be a regional thing, here in central PA I can take a rock and hit numerous shops that can and will work on an old car. I've actually worked on quite a few 60's MOPARS here at the Chrysler dealership.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest simplyconnected

Sorry to hijack your thread. Your question is echoed in many places across the U.S. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Fr Mike</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Any recommendations?</div></div> Potts and Borvan Avenues (two blocks from Lambeau Field) have nine or ten shops that work on cars AND TRUCKS. Go into a couple truck repair shops and talk with a mechanic there. They should know who is good (and who to avoid). Their opinions should be unbiased. By the way, your classic car works more like a truck than a new car. You may even find a good truck mechanic that is excellent with old cars.

Appleton isn't far, either. Certainly between Appleton and Green Bay, there must be good classic car mechanics. You didn't mention what kind of work you are looking for; engine, body, paint, trim, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Fr Mike

During the 16 years I have lived here, I have tried some mechanics/shops in my area reported to be good with old cars, but unfortunately have found them not to be.

I think a number truly want to be, but are not (at least not yet.) Part of the problem is: How many old cars are there in a given area to provide experience or to provide enough business for a specialty shop?

My original question still remains.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for sharing useful information.May I suggest you get lots of classes in diagnostics? If you can become good at that you can get job anywhere. By the way, many women are apprehensive of mechanics. Probably because most are men and sometimes greasy. I'm sure many women would prefer you work on their cars if you are good and honest.

Autoselect-Used Cars, New Cars, Find yo...lley Blue Book

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest adam_knox

I don't know if West Bend is too far, but there is a gentleman I know who started a classic car restoration business. Does a great job too. Not sure if he does engine work, but surely he know's people in the area. PM me if you want his #.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Fr Mike

Mainly the engine.

I had already inquired arund <span style="text-decoration: underline">before</span> entering my post. Yeah, they <span style="text-decoration: underline">can</span> work on old engines. But my old engines have unique characteristics and properties that need to be understood, and require techniques not run across in modern cars. There's also the matter of experience and knowing where to get parts.

So, I repeat my initial posted request . . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...