Jump to content

46 Roadmaster - best attach points when pulling engine?


46Chris

Recommended Posts

Leaking rear main seal, along with some noise in the trans. Car is in the shop, and my mechanic and I are getting ready to pull the engine/trans. He said it's been years since he pulled one of this vintage, and was wondering if there is a better attach point than the head bolts. We're going to start pulling tomorrow (maybe).

Thanks in advance for the help - Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chris, When I took the engine out of my 47 I took the head off first and then used the head bolts. One in the front, one in the back. It also helps to have a engine leveler on as the engine really needs to tilt. If you remove the radiator,I didnt need to remove my grill but that was on a Super not Roadie.

Good luck/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pulled the rocker shaft and used the shaft bolt holes...only 2 of them, didn't use a leveler...had no problems. I've seen others use one of the thermostat mounting holes and a rear exhaust manifold stud hole too. Use a decent sized chain and you should be OK...good bolts too...make sure they're fairly tight. Oh yeah, I held the hoist's hook in place using a bolt and nut in the two links on either side...I did have to orient the chain so the back of the engine would tilt down a bit...good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest rusty1951

On installing the engine, would it be better to install with the head on or install the head after the block is in. I would worry about getting dirt into the short block.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest simplyconnected

That IS a lot of engine, Aaron65. The factory uses a plate, bolted onto the heads (V-8). The plates have a big hole for a hook. If the engine/tranny are one unit, they bolt the plates to the back of each head. If it's just the engine, the plates get bolted to the back of one head, and the front of the opposite head. Once set on its mounts, the plates are unbolted and re-used. It is very important to tighten the plates to the heads.

I would like to see more pictures of your engine decking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest simplyconnected

Great job, Aaron! That engine sure looks good. What all did you do to your engine while it was out? How did your cylinders look?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pulled everything off and took it to my friendly local machinist to rebuild, as I am doing a lot of metalwork on my ongoing '65 Mustang project--my garage was and is no place to be rebuilding an engine. It got new Egge pistons (.030), the crank was turned under .010 on rods and mains...I cleaned up and reused a used rocker shaft from Wheatbelt Buick...it needed new valves but only one guide, and I had already replaced all the lifters so that was all good, but it did need new pushrods. The oil pump was fine, but it had 2 broken rings. Turns out a pushrod rocker end had broken enough to dance around, making a terrible hammering that didn't sound like a valve noise. So, with that and the blowby from the broken rings, it was time for a rebuild! I put 2000 miles on it this year and I don't think I checked the oil more than 5 times...new rings are great! I would have driven it even more, but I have 3 running old cars to split mileage among, and the '53 isn't the mileage champ. Next project--aside from the still apart Mustang, pulling the Corvair's heads and checking the valve guides...the vacuum readings don't look good. Thanks for the compliments!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest simplyconnected

What a great total rebuild. The job should last for a very long time of trouble-free service.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Aaron65</div><div class="ubbcode-body">...it had 2 broken rings. ...I don't think I checked the oil more than 5 times...new rings are great!</div></div>

New rings ARE great. Equally important is the cross-hatch your machine shop honed into the cylinders. The grooves prevent your new rings from hydroplaning, and they hold oil for greater lubrication. A smooth bore is an oil burner (characterized by most old, smooth, cylinders).

I didn't hear anything about your water jackets/cooling system. I hope your guy cleared the junk out from around they cylinders, and installed new brass freeze plugs. Broken rings are commonly caused by overheating, so keep an eye on your temps (for a while). What did your rebuilder say about using new valve springs? - Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't ask, but it got new freeze plugs and a lot of cleaning time, so I assume they cleaned out the water jackets...I KNOW it overheated in the past, so the rings were probably caused by that (it had a plugged radiator when i got it). It runs pretty cool now, the only time it gets past normal is on a hot day idling for a long time after a long freeway drive...nowhere near overheating. Valvesprings were fine...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...