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OK- so we all know an 'antique' is anything 25 years or older (so they say) but curious if anyone else feels that shouldnt be the case?

IMO-I cant imagine that a 1982 Chrysler Le Baron should have antique plates...

I still think antique should be pre 62

Thanks for your opinion.

Lenny Schaeffer

Woburn MA

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States vary for the age of the car to qualify for antique or historic plates. In Virginia its 25 years. In my opinion, antique plates merely signify a vehicle category with some benefits (lower/no taxes, no safety inspections, etc.) but also some restrictions (primarily how/when the vehicle can be used). Just because a car is an "antique" doesn't mean it is necessarily "collectable." Whats collectable to you may not be collectable to me.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ChopShopCustoms</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I can't imagine that a 1982 Chrysler Le Baron should have antique plates...</div></div>

Funny you mention that, I saw a Chrysler, I think it 's called Fifth Avenue? the other day with historic plates. In MD it's 25 years for most, 20 for orphans. What p!$$es me off is that apparently the people in the MVA will tell people that they can skip the MD inspection (which takes place only when the car is retitled, is a PITA, and you can't have the car registered without passing) by registering any old heap as a historic vehicle. What's gonna happen is some dumb legislator is gonna call them on it and the hobbyist who has a real collector car is gonna come out on the short end of the stick (shaft).

By the way, I meant to say, I'm afraid it depends on your perspective (ie, age). grin.gif In 1975, a 1950 car seemed old to me. In 2000, a '62 car did not!

Methusela

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OK, so I'll put out my old fashioned opinion.

Horseless carriage or brass car - pre-1916

Antique - pre-WW2 (pre 1943)

Classic - CCCA definition

Special Interest, Vintage, Collectable, etc. post WW2 (post 1945)

I started fooling with cars in 1964, I was 13, my first car a 1931 Chevrolet which I still own. It was pretty simple back then, as antique had a specific definition (pre WW2). I think (IMHO) that it is silly to call a 1983 Detroitmobile an "antique." As far as antique plates go, it p**ses me off too to see daily driving trucks and cars with antique plates, but for someone doing it to eliminate inspection and such, is just a litigious incident waiting to happen, in our sue-happy society.

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Doug, we went thru that scenario here last year. My local House representative was the one who introduced the legislation to make getting an antique plate more of a PITA- unbeknown to most car hobbyists in his House district- and made me vote Democratic for the first time in over 20 years.

The only real effect has been that it now costs 500% more to get the plate. I see just as many clunkers with antique plates on the road as I did before, so that tells me it was really only about money. Instead of forcing DMV and police to enforce the existing statutes, his solution was to raise the licensing fee and create a pile of paperwork. At least Democrats will call a tax what it is- Republicans in Vajenya like to call it a "fee". Doesn't resonate quite as loud with voters come re-election time.

I fully expect the [censored] to keep bringing it before the General Assembly until he's got them back in personal property tax rolls. He sits on Counties Cities and Towns House subcommittee, so although he denies it I know some of these cash-strapped localities are bending his ear so they can tax antique plated cars at exorbitant assessments.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ted sweet</div><div class="ubbcode-body">IN ny THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO historical plates except u can use YOM plates </div></div>

Not totally true. The fee for an Historical plate in NY is a flat fee of $23 per year. Regular registrations are based on the vehicle weight or gross weight in the case of trailers and commercial vehicles. My Dodge Dakota costs $31.75 per year as a passenger car based on a weight of 5151 lbs., and I have to pay for two years at a time. For most old cars, the Historical is cheaper, except for cars like my dad's 1910 Sears that weighs about 1200 lbs. Also, when using YOM plates, if you let them lapse, they make you pay for the lapsed time when you renew. The reason is that you are "holding" that number.

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When I joined AACA anything newer than 1935 was not considered to be an eligible antique. That lasted until 1974, and it was a long, hard fight. I don't think it's time to turn back the clock to the bad old times.

QUOTE: By the way, I meant to say, I'm afraid it depends on your perspective (ie, age). In 1975, a 1950 car seemed old to me. In 2000, a '62 car did not! UNQUOTE

I think if it was right in your time, it should be right in the current generation's time. Of course I don't think the current crop of computerized cars will last past the failure of their computer after they're 7 to 15 years old; no parts, and no mechanics to fix them, unless they are genius'.

Only occasioinal cars newer than 1958 interest me, like the '71 Riviera I've been working on for 8 years; but I try to remember how I felt when my father's generation in this hobby called my '39 Buick names and I have some empathy for people who like the newer cars. If you don't belive mid-sixties to mid-70's are collectible, just attend one of these auctions. The day of my four '39 Buicks has passed just like the Model T did during the 1980s. I also have an '81 Riviera that I have just for long haul tours (AACA Founders Tour mostly), so I don't have to haul a trailer, and so I have good A/C here in Florida. We're gettin' old, just like the '39 Buicks.

All of that said, if the use of some of the near prophane language isn't removed from this thread, I've got a hunch it will be pulled down by the moderators.

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Gentleman ... Gentlemen!!! Will we never learn. We have been down this road several times in the past and to what avail. Because you see it is not an issue of money it is not an issue of one state's regulations verses another states regulations, rather it is an issue of integrity/honesty that I believe we as care takers of the "history" of this wonderful automotive industry need to preserve it.

I love to play the game of golf and you only need play one round of golf to see where a man stands with honesty/integrity. And so it is with Antique/classic cars. I truly believe it degrades Antique/Classic car industry as a whole to use what I would call "financial loophole" to license their 1982 Chrysler La Baron to either save money or avoid an inspection. Shame on you!!! ChopShopCustoms you are very generous with the pre 62... My vote would be late 50's. Soooo finally I'm very pleased to be the owner of a 1939 Chrysler, and did I mention it has current inspection sticker!!!

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Lenny, How can you say that! Think of all "The Younger Members" that grew up with those fine examples of automotive history. Style engineering and just plain good looks. Who wants to look at Thomas Flyers, Mercer Raceabouts and '32 3Windows? There has to be a reason why the Mustangs, Cameros and other FINE CLASSICS are pushing that old crap off the show fields. I hope you sreiously rethink what you started with this thread. Oh, I forgot "Matching Numbers" that old crap never had that and "Build Sheets" stuff that really matters. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ChopShopCustoms</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK- so we all know an 'antique' is anything 25 years or older (so they say) but curious if anyone else feels that shouldnt be the case?

IMO-I cant imagine that a 1982 Chrysler Le Baron should have antique plates...

I still think antique should be pre 62

Thanks for your opinion.

Lenny Schaeffer

Woburn MA </div></div>

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Times change and the World keeps moving on. We can't hardly even find or buy lacquer paint anymore. As a friend of mine likes to say, "we're just like fleas on a dog's back, we just go along for the ride."

Remember that movie, "Build a field and they will come." Well, bring the Kissel, Thomas Flyer, Piedmont or Pierce Arrow to a National Meet, and they will look and oooo and ahhh. I just don't want to see the mistakes of the 1960's repeated. I guess you were there then, the same as I was, but perhaps we each had a different perspective at the time.

By the way, I joined AACA in 1962. That gives me a perspective on that pre-'62 comment too, but I prefer to look the other way.

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I hate renewing every year and changing the sticker. i have 5 cars with Historical plates and 4 of them cost more as historical plates.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Steve Braverman</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ted sweet</div><div class="ubbcode-body">IN ny THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO historical plates except u can use YOM plates </div></div>

Not totally true. The fee for an Historical plate in NY is a flat fee of $23 per year. Regular registrations are based on the vehicle weight or gross weight in the case of trailers and commercial vehicles. My Dodge Dakota costs $31.75 per year as a passenger car based on a weight of 5151 lbs., and I have to pay for two years at a time. For most old cars, the Historical is cheaper, except for cars like my dad's 1910 Sears that weighs about 1200 lbs. Also, when using YOM plates, if you let them lapse, they make you pay for the lapsed time when you renew. The reason is that you are "holding" that number. </div></div>

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I'd as soon not see them on a rod, and especially a fiberglass bodied one with thoroughly modern underpinnings and all creature comforts, but at least we know those cars are probably maintained and safe.

As opposed to say, a clapped-out mid-70s pickup that is obviously used to haul wood and trash, but proudly displays its antique plate. The plate is the only thing on the vehicle that looks anywhere near restored.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Leonard Shepherd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I don't mind people putting antique plates on a car that is 25 years old, unless they are using it as a daily driver, but I do mind having antique plates on this rod.

</div></div>

You have to be careful with a generalization like that. I know of a number or ORIGINAL T's, A's, 50 Fords, 57 Chevys, etc. that have been made into beautiful rods and customs. In those cases, an antique plate is correct in the legal sense. If the car is a fiberglass replica body, then no, an antique plate is not correct or even legal. With the passage of the replica car bill in 2008,

http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+46.2-602.1

Virginia is catching up with replicas incorrectly displaying antique plates.

People put too much emphasis on "antique plates." The cars that qualify for antique plates are simply meeting a legal definition that each state is free to make. That is totaly separate and different from what constitutes an "antique" from a collectability standpoint. I doubt that anyone will ever agree to a single, simple definition of an antique from that standpoint for the simple reason that everyone, whether a group or an individual, has their own preferences and bias's. Even though I admire the beauty and craftmanship of pre-WW2 Packards/Duesenburgs/Caddilacs/etc. they have no real frame of reference for me. Having been born in 1954 the cars that I remember while growing up and that had an impact on me are the ones from the late 50s through early 70's. I can remember waiting for the school bus in the morning and watching the guy who lived behind me blast by each morning in his 1967 390 Mustang GT fastback. I loved that car and wanted to own something like it some day. I'd much rather own and drive a 1964 R-Code Galaxie than any pre-WW2 car ever made. But that's my preference.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Leonard Shepherd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I have seen this "motor home" a couple of years ago in Richmond, VA with antique plates. </div></div>

It is hard to tell from the photo, but the plate on it now does not appear to be an antique plate. It looks like dark blue/black on a white plate. If that is the case, then he got caught with an illegal tag.

Penalty for illegal use of an antique plate from 46.2-730:

H. Any owner of an antique motor vehicle or antique trailer registered with license plates pursuant to this section who is convicted of a violation of this section shall be guilty of a Class 4 misdemeanor. Upon receiving a record of conviction of a violation of this section, the Department shall revoke and not reinstate the owner's privilege to register the vehicle operated in violation of this section with license plates issued or authorized for use pursuant to this section for a period of five years from the date of conviction.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: rocketraider</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Doug, we went thru that scenario here last year. My local House representative was the one who introduced the legislation to make getting an antique plate more of a PITA- unbeknown to most car hobbyists in his House district- and made me vote Democratic for the first time in over 20 years.

The only real effect has been that it now costs 500% more to get the plate. I see just as many clunkers with antique plates on the road as I did before, so that tells me it was really only about money. Instead of forcing DMV and police to enforce the existing statutes, his solution was to raise the licensing fee and create a pile of paperwork. At least Democrats will call a tax what it is- Republicans in Vajenya like to call it a "fee". Doesn't resonate quite as loud with voters come re-election time.

I fully expect the [censored] to keep bringing it before the General Assembly until he's got them back in personal property tax rolls. He sits on Counties Cities and Towns House subcommittee, so although he denies it I know some of these cash-strapped localities are bending his ear so they can tax antique plated cars at exorbitant assessments. </div></div>

Yes, Danny Marshall is a PITA. But I hardly think that a $50.00 fee (used to be $10.00) for a LIFETIME antique vehicle registration and ONE additional form that must be filled out and submitted to the DMV (and does NOT have to be notarized anymore) hardly constitutes a hardship for the Virginia automobile enthusiast. If you look at other state's fees and laws, you will find that Virginia is one of the more liberal states when it comes to antique vehicle ownership.

I hope you are a member of one of the five Virginia car club councils and express your views through them. More info on the councils can be found at http://www.vaacc.org/

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> § 46.2-602.1. Titling and registration of replica vehicles.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, <span style="text-decoration: underline"><span style="font-weight: bold">the model year of vehicles constructed or assembled by multiple manufacturers or assemblers</span></span> shall be the model year of which the vehicle is a replica. No vehicle titled under this section shall be driven more than 5,000 miles per year as shown by the vehicle's odometer. No vehicle titled under this section shall be automatically eligible for antique motor vehicle license plates provided for in § 46.2-730.

</div></div>

Bill, I don't see how anyone with DMV will ever be able to police the code stated above. They're still trying to figure out what an antique vehicle is. confused.gif

I think that's why Rocketraider hasn't seen any progress in his area either. What did that trooper in the Richmond DMV Meeting say a couple years ago? They didn't have time to mess with the few violators of the antique license law? At least that fellow considered it the few. frown.gif

Wayne

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Most people are fine calling cars from their childhood antiques, but don't like it when cars they purchased new in adult years become antiques because it makes them feel old. But, time marches on, and they are.

If no collected Hudsons, Packards, and Studebakers in the 1960's and 1970's, I doubt there would be very many around now. I can appreciate pre-1930 cars, but have no interest in ever owning one. I have no connection or memories with them. They look more alike to me than cars of the '50's 60's and '70's do. That does not mean that they are not worthwhile antiques, and I would never say they are not worthy of collecting.

Likewise I think it is an insult when anyone says that anything from the 1970's is not a real antique. Yes they are. Nothing like a '76 Eldorado convertible or Continental Mark V, or even Mustang II Ghia or Gremlin will ever be built again. So they deserve repect and preservation just as much as any other decade of antiques. Whether they are to your liking or not is a personal choice, not a reason to insult them and the people that like them.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Leonard Shepherd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I am pretty sure that the motor home had antique plates. The were original year white with black letters for the year of the truck. </div></div>

Hard to tell from the photo.

Here is a cool site with examples of every license plate used in Virginia from 1906 to 2008.

http://www.licensepl8s.com/va1.html

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: R W Burgess</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> § 46.2-602.1. Titling and registration of replica vehicles.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, <span style="text-decoration: underline"><span style="font-weight: bold">the model year of vehicles constructed or assembled by multiple manufacturers or assemblers</span></span> shall be the model year of which the vehicle is a replica. No vehicle titled under this section shall be driven more than 5,000 miles per year as shown by the vehicle's odometer. No vehicle titled under this section shall be automatically eligible for antique motor vehicle license plates provided for in § 46.2-730.

</div></div>

Bill, I don't see how anyone with DMV will ever be able to police the code stated above. They're still trying to figure out what an antique vehicle is. confused.gif

I think that's why Rocketraider hasn't seen any progress in his area either. What did that trooper in the Richmond DMV Meeting say a couple years ago? They didn't have time to mess with the few violators of the antique license law? At least that fellow considered it the few. frown.gif

Wayne </div></div>

Never said the laws on the books could be/would be enforced, but they are the laws and hobbiests should be familar with them lest one day they get bit in the butt. The DMV did in fact go through the registration records and cull out all replica vehicles that were titled under previous laws and sent letters that asked the owners to re-title the vehicles under the new law at no charge. The letter pointed out that if the vehicle were to be sold it would have to be re-titled under the new law. I know that some people complied and some did not. There was no penalty for not complying that I am aware of. I have a copy of one of the letters. The 250 mile pleasure drive limit is unenforcable too, but it is the law.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LINC400</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Most people are fine calling cars from their childhood antiques, but don't like it when cars they purchased new in adult years become antiques because it makes them feel old. But, time marches on, and they are.

If no collected Hudsons, Packards, and Studebakers in the 1960's and 1970's, I doubt there would be very many around now. I can appreciate pre-1930 cars, but have no interest in ever owning one. I have no connection or memories with them. They look more alike to me than cars of the '50's 60's and '70's do. That does not mean that they are not worthwhile antiques, and I would never say they are not worthy of collecting.

Likewise I think it is an insult when anyone says that anything from the 1970's is not a real antique. Yes they are. Nothing like a '76 Eldorado convertible or Continental Mark V, or even Mustang II Ghia or Gremlin will ever be built again. So they deserve repect and preservation just as much as any other decade of antiques. Whether they are to your liking or not is a personal choice, not a reason to insult them and the people that like them. </div></div>

Agree 100%. It will be interesting to see what is considered a collectable car 50 years from now. Let's see, I'll be 104! Probably Priuses and Civic hybrids. laugh.gif

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Guest ChopShopCustoms

<span style="font-style: italic"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1937hd45</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Lenny, How can you say that! Think of all "The Younger Members" that grew up with those fine examples of automotive history. Style engineering and just plain good looks. Who wants to look at Thomas Flyers, Mercer Raceabouts and '32 3Windows? There has to be a reason why the Mustangs, Cameros and other FINE CLASSICS are pushing that old crap off the show fields. I hope you sreiously rethink what you started with this thread. Oh, I forgot "Matching Numbers" that old crap never had that and "Build Sheets" stuff that really matters. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ChopShopCustoms</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK- so we all know an 'antique' is anything 25 years or older (so they say) but curious if anyone else feels that shouldnt be the case?

IMO-I cant imagine that a 1982 Chrysler Le Baron should have antique plates...

I still think antique should be pre 62

Thanks for your opinion.

Lenny Schaeffer

Woburn MA </div></div> </div></div></span>

OK so this will get even more heated with this. I MEANT to say pre 72- didnt check my post.(darn fingers)

As for the Younger Members- <span style="font-style: italic">I may be one</span>- I am 45- the cars of my year were the early 80's and late 70's cars. Yet I drove 60's Mustangs to school and my HS Grad gift was the 56 Chevy I still have today. Im not sure what the average AACA age of a member is....

In our state (MA) We have Antique plates to classify anything older thn 25 years. National shows use anything from pre 1980 to pre 48 for their events to classify what THEY feel is a classic/antique.

I just find it so straneg that soemthing as esctheticaly dull as an early 80s car could be considerd something to treasure...

Guess it means I am getting old.

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Bill, you hope you will see 104 smile.gif

In Maryland they have (or had when I lived there) a special plate for modifieds, and did not allow them to be registered as antiques (though many were anyway). In my opinion that is how it should be.

Linc400 called it exactly what it is, "an insult", when people talk down to the later cars he collects. I was there 40 years ago and went through the same thing. In my case, it drove me to become active and get changes made. You can't change the insults, but you can change the rules, and when the rules go away, with time, so do the insults.

The operative insult word, "used cars" has now retreated from the late 1930s to (I guess) the late 1970s, but the fact is, it should be banned from use in our hobby. I hope thinking people will stop using that words in connection with the old car hobby.

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Guest ChopShopCustoms

I even hate it when people use 'old car'. There really should be a middle ground- where cars of 25-40 years should co- maybe just calling them vintage? Not sure- in any event - as a bulder, I am starting to see the cars of my era come in for restorations and custom work. Have an 85 Bonneville that was done .

My shop goes with the flow and 4 years ago I was doing street rods and Tri fives. Now its all early muscle so its telling you where the trends are going I guess.

In any event Im glad it just keeps the hobby going.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bill_Haegele</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I hardly think that a $50.00 fee (used to be $10.00) for a LIFETIME antique vehicle registration and ONE additional form that must be filled out and submitted to the DMV (and does NOT have to be notarized anymore) hardly constitutes a hardship for the Virginia automobile enthusiast.</div></div>

It's the principle of it, Bill. There were laws in place to address abuse of the plates. Those weren't enforced. Now we have another law that likely won't be enforced as long as the Commonwealth is getting its cut.

I've personally turned in questionable antique plates (on farm trucks, obvious beaters and the like) and local LE response was that it was a very low priority for them. Now if the law in Mr. Marshall's home city and county doesn't want to be bothered with it, why did he see it as a problem if it wasn't at their request? Pretty obvious somebody wanted a revenue increase and saw a way to get it. The revenue projections attached to last year's bill validate that.

A DMV trip is downright inconvenient for me as the closest ones are 30 miles from my job, and are closed when I get off work. Means I have to take a vacation day to handle DMV business.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If you look at other state's fees and laws, you will find that Virginia is one of the more liberal states when it comes to antique vehicle ownership.</div></div>

I'm aware of that and thankful that it is. I've also been using AQ/AV plates since the mid-80s so it's not like I'm a novice with them.

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Ahhh, How well I remember my first Hershey, 1980 (I was 21 years old), the first of the great tri-five Chevys (1955 MY)was now able to show at Hershey and the old timers with their Model Ts and 1908 Beasleys were clucking their tounge saying " '55 Chevy, that's an old car now? S___T, I remember driving my new '55 Chevy to Hershey to get parts for the Beasley, here. That ain't an old car"

So in 2005 (and every year since) I see cars like a 1980 Dodge Mirada and a Volkswagen Rabbit and I say.................................................

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ChopShopCustoms</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style="font-style: italic"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1937hd45</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Lenny, How can you say that! Think of all "The Younger Members" that grew up with those fine examples of automotive history. Style engineering and just plain good looks. Who wants to look at Thomas Flyers, Mercer Raceabouts and '32 3Windows? There has to be a reason why the Mustangs, Cameros and other FINE CLASSICS are pushing that old crap off the show fields. I hope you sreiously rethink what you started with this thread. Oh, I forgot "Matching Numbers" that old crap never had that and "Build Sheets" stuff that really matters. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ChopShopCustoms</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK- so we all know an 'antique' is anything 25 years or older (so they say) but curious if anyone else feels that shouldnt be the case?

IMO-I cant imagine that a 1982 Chrysler Le Baron should have antique plates...

I still think antique should be pre 62

Thanks for your opinion.

Lenny Schaeffer

Woburn MA </div></div> </div></div></span>

OK so this will get even more heated with this. I MEANT to say pre 72- didnt check my post.(darn fingers)

As for the Younger Members- <span style="font-style: italic">I may be one</span>- I am 45- the cars of my year were the early 80's and late 70's cars. Yet I drove 60's Mustangs to school and my HS Grad gift was the 56 Chevy I still have today. Im not sure what the average AACA age of a member is....

In our state (MA) We have Antique plates to classify anything older thn 25 years. National shows use anything from pre 1980 to pre 48 for their events to classify what THEY feel is a classic/antique.

I just find it so straneg that soemthing as esctheticaly dull as an early 80s car could be considerd something to treasure...

Guess it means I am getting old. </div></div>

So cars should be 37 years old to be an antique? How do you arrive at this number?

Also there is almost no difference between most GM, Chrysler, AMC, and some Ford products other than new front bumpers and some trim changes. So I really don't get your reasoning.

As far as license plates, changing the age that a car is considered an antique is not going to stop people from abusing antique plates. They had a lot of this abuse in Wisconsin. So they now state that since the car is an antique, it should not be being driven in winter when there are no car shows and there is salt and snow on the roads. So antique plates are invalid from November until March. If you are driving during those months with antique plates, it is the same as driving with no or expired plates.

That wouldn't work in southern states. So they could do what Illinois does. You must have proof that your car is insured as an antique with full coverage, not just regular daily driver liability, before you can apply for antique plates. Also you must sign a statement saying that the car can only be used at car club events, car shows, and taking it for repairs. Of course anyone can just lie about that, but then it makes it rather difficult to explain why your "antique" wagon or pick up is out in January loaded with painting, plumbing, electrical supplies or scrap metal. And you can't say you didn't know since you signed the statement.

Also there is a term for cars that are 25-40 years old. It is "antique". That is what the term means. Simply that it is over 25 years old. It doesn't make any mention of quality or rarity. There are other terms for that, CCCA Classic, Milestone, Vintage (already in use), brass era, etc.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: rocketraider</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bill_Haegele</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I hardly think that a $50.00 fee (used to be $10.00) for a LIFETIME antique vehicle registration and ONE additional form that must be filled out and submitted to the DMV (and does NOT have to be notarized anymore) hardly constitutes a hardship for the Virginia automobile enthusiast.</div></div>

It's the principle of it, Bill. There were laws in place to address abuse of the plates. Those weren't enforced. Now we have another law that likely won't be enforced as long as the Commonwealth is getting its cut.

I've personally turned in questionable antique plates (on farm trucks, obvious beaters and the like) and local LE response was that it was a very low priority for them. Now if the law in Mr. Marshall's home city and county doesn't want to be bothered with it, why did he see it as a problem if it wasn't at their request? Pretty obvious somebody wanted a revenue increase and saw a way to get it. The revenue projections attached to last year's bill validate that.

A DMV trip is downright inconvenient for me as the closest ones are 30 miles from my job, and are closed when I get off work. Means I have to take a vacation day to handle DMV business.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If you look at other state's fees and laws, you will find that Virginia is one of the more liberal states when it comes to antique vehicle ownership.</div></div>

I'm aware of that and thankful that it is. I've also been using AQ/AV plates since the mid-80s so it's not like I'm a novice with them. </div></div>

Its called a "compromise." My definition of the word "compromise" is an agreement that satisfies no one. grin.gif

I don't disagree with anything you have said. I just recognize that it could have been much worse if Marshall got his way.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: mrpushbutton</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Ahhh, How well I remember my first Hershey, 1980 (I was 21 years old), the first of the great tri-five Chevys (1955 MY)was now able to show at Hershey and the old timers with their Model Ts and 1908 Beasleys were clucking their tounge saying " '55 Chevy, that's an old car now? S___T, I remember driving my new '55 Chevy to Hershey to get parts for the Beasley, here. That ain't an old car"

So in 2005 (and every year since) I see cars like a 1980 Dodge Mirada and a Volkswagen Rabbit and I say................................................. </div></div>

John, looks like you and I are about the same age. I was 21 years old in 1980 as well.

In March of that year I purchased my first car while I was in college.

Used all the money I had saved from my jobs in high school for the down payment.

Worked jobs at college to make the monthly car payment, pay for insurance, gas, repairs (and pay for other college expenses).

That first car of mine took me to a number of states here in the USA and a few provinces in Canada.

It served me well when I got out of school and started working for a living.

In the mid to late 1990s I decided to restore that car because I wanted to preserve a small piece of automotive history.

Some of my friends thought I was crazy spending countless hours and dollars on that project.

AFAIK, No One with that model of vehicle had done a restoration from the ground up like I was doing.

Before I took it to it's fist show I wondered how it would be received since 99% of the vehicles at these shows were modified.

Funny thing happened at the shows that year, people REALLY liked seeing it.

After I joined the AACA, I wondered how this car would be received at AACA Meets.

When I drive this vehicle in at a meet I hear all sorts of comments from the spectators.

Some nice, some not so nice. Personally, I do not care about the not so nice comments.

I have met so many, many, nice people at AACA Meets. From salesmen who sold these cars to service people who

worked on them back in the day to people who used to own them to one person who actually built them, to people who just appreciate what this vehicle contributed to automotive history.

BTW John, in case you did not know the vehicle I am speaking of is my 1980 Volkswagen Rabbit.

The same one you mentioned in your post. I also know the owner of the 1980 Dodge Mirada who is a very nice guy.

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I found the following item posted on-line recently which I found appropriate for this thread:

A young couple moves into a new neighborhood. The next morning while they are eating breakfast, the young woman sees her neighbor hanging the wash outside. “That laundry is not very clean”, she said. “She doesn’t know how to wash correctly. Perhaps she needs better laundry soap.”

Her husband looked on, but remained silent.

Every time her neighbor would hang her wash to dry, the young woman would make the same comments.

About one month later, the woman was surprised to see a nice clean wash on the line and said to her husband: “Look, she has learned how to wash correctly. I wonder who taught her this.”

The husband said, “I got up early this morning and cleaned our windows.”

And so it is with life. What we see when watching others depends on the purity of the window through which we look.

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I took my '79 Monte Carlo to a local "antique car show" for the first time last year. I was worried that I would be turned away at the gate and told to park it in the visitor lot instead of the show field, that my car wouldn't be considered old enough. I was SHOCKED to discover that at least a third of the cars were no older than mine (late model Mustangs and Plymouth Prowlers, anyone?), and most of the rest were just late 60's / early 70's muscle cars. Silly me, I expected to see mostly 1920's - 1950's vehicles. There were only about 5 pre-war cars out of about 500 cars total and the 1950's cars were mostly represented only by the '55-'57 Chevys.

I realize that a small local show is no Hershey, but it is far more indicative of the general trend. THIS is what most people call "antique".

I too find 1950's and older cars far more interesting and collectible. But in a few months, my '79 will be 30 years old. Back when it was brand new, people were already buying and restoring "antique cars" that were far less than 30 years old at that time, and nobody was saying they weren't old enough. Just how old does an old car have to be before it's percieved as old, anyway?

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