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ID a car in St. James, MN


mncorn1
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I hope this will work.

I will try to post a picture of my grandfathers car from about 1920 to 1930 in St. James, Minnesota. If we can identify this car, it will help the family determine when Carl Peterson created his art work in his yard in St. James.

Thanks,

Todd

post-58957-143138014566_thumb.jpg

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A "Clymer" was a guy by the name of Floyd Clymer who is a popular after market accessory maker and book writer for old car publications. The "through the windshield spotlight is a unit that you could install in a flat windshield by boring a hole and mounting it.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: mncorn1</div><div class="ubbcode-body">What is "Clymer thru the windshield spotlight"? Or what is a 'clymer'? </div></div>

Floyd Clymer invented the through the windsheild spotlight. You had a hole drilled through the glass and a pistol grip inside directed the light. http://www.floydclymer.org/leavenworth.htm Floyd Clymer went on to publish some of the great Automotive books in the early years of the hobby just after WWII.

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On the second picture with the car and boat, what makes this car a 1925 Chevrolet coupe and not a '27 or '24....and so on.

The house in the background of the picture of the car and boat, Carl Peterson built the house in 1906. He retired in the 1930's and lived to be 100 years old and died in 1969 in St. James, MN. His art work made of cement and stone filled the yard. Look at the yard, there is very few things in the yard. This will help identify when he started his work in the yard. His work is currently on display at the John Michael Koehler Art Museum in Sheboygan, WI.

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Hi Folks,

I was fascinated by the comments on the "Clymer thru the windshield spotlight" and thanks for the background. During my rallying days in the 1960s here in the UK we used a similar wonderful device known as the Helphos. Consisted of a glass fronted sucker which was put onto the inside of the windscreen and the plastic body with the bulb then clipped on. The body had two rates of twisting so I guess about 120 arc could be swivelled. If the car breaks down during the night, you unclip it and hang it in the engine bay. Wonderful device. Still have it on my dormant 1968 Ford Cortina 1600 E. Photo of the Helphos can be seen on http://www.wolfsburgwarehouse.com/BD254c.htm. Guess it must be known in the US ?

Regards Vintman (UK)

www.svvs.org

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The 26 and 27 Fords had the same engine as the rest of the Model T's. Ford added a starter and a generator in 1920 but they are mostly the same. It featured a 22 HP flathead 4 cylinder water cooled engine with an integral planetary transmission.

Frank

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: mncorn1</div><div class="ubbcode-body">On the second picture with the car and boat, what makes this car a 1925 Chevrolet coupe and not a '27 or '24....and so on.

</div></div>

I agree it looks like a Chevrolet. But if it is a Chevy it is 1924 at the latest. The '25 through '28 coupes had a "landau" top which looks like a convertible with "S"-shaped landau irons.

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