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Pitting VS restoring?


Willy

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A question I come up with often - how far can an item be rusted, and still be restorable? Can pitting be filled in? Can a fender with small spots of through rust still be usable? I have many antique auto parts that I don't put on ebay, because I don't think they are worthwhile. Experts?

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Any part can be restored. The controling factor is how rare the part is and whether there is a cheaper replacement. There are metal spray processes that can fill rust pitting and holes. Metal or fiberglas can be used to fabricate patch panels. If you list your parts on EBay just be forthright and honest in a detailed description and you most likely will sell the part to a happy recipiant. Remember the old adage "one mans junk is another man's treasure"

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Never throw anything out, Willy, unless there is almost nothing left; and then think twice. Two of Harrah's senior staff, Bud Catlett and Ray Jesch and their wives were in Australia for an International event in 1970. Ray told us that Mr Harrah's instruction was to restore original parts as lng as it cost not more than four times that of an alternative. As long as you have the equipment, a bit of basic knowledge, and the determination you can restore almost any antique car or part thereof. I guess your 25 year old rule may be a trap in that. I would hate to rebuild a very modern used car, but you probably can get most of what you want. For the real antique cars, repairable parts and patterns are precious.

Ivan Saxton.

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Re: 10/02/08 02:28 AM

"Can a fender with small spots of through rust still be usable?"

Two or three coats of properly applied "POR" to both sides of the part can make it "usable" if the holes are very small and in a place where it will not recieve stresses.

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A number of years ago, I worked at a shop that restored Austin Healeys. We were in the middle of cutting up the chassis of a total rust bucket, when a guy from Australia wandered in. He nearly had a coronary. "We would have restored that car, mate." he sez. It had no floor, no rockers, no outriggers, no trunk floor, major rust out in the forward frame rails, etc., etc. Most Healeys went to the states. They are rare in the UK and Australia, so they will restore anything that resembles an AH

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I remember years ago at Hershey stopping to discuss a badly rusted car at a space and everyone was saying it wasn't even a viable parts car when a visitor from England entered the fray and said " You Yanks are spoiled, in England if there is anything 12 inches below the door handles we've got an easy restoration" Added a whole new perspective to how I viewed unrestored cars.

Howard Dennis

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You Yanks are spoiled, in England if there is anything 12 inches below the door handles we've got an easy restoration</div></div>If that's the case, I'm spoiled. If it's total junk it stays total junk. If the rust is big enough to put my fist through it, I look to replace the metal.

BUT

Why spend the time and money when you can buy something in better shape cheaper than you can fix. Over there if there isn't anything, they don't have the choice.

As I've said before, you can't turn a pile of $h!T into a chocolate mouse' Of course if money is no object you can, but for less money you can find something nicer and save yourself the aggravation. If you're paying someone by the hour to rebuild something, a lot of times it's cheaper to pay more money to buy something better to start with.

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Little holes v/ big holes.

Why spend top dollar for a car with small holes that looks real good, when you can buy wiyh normal rust/rot for much less?

Your going to replace the whole door bottom anyway, and those normal rust spots have to be done over anyway if you are going to put thousands of dollars in a paint job.

By the time you get the frame off, you will find plenty of places to patch, no mater what you buy.

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Well Roger, usually if it isn't in original condition so we know what we have we don't buy it. Small holes we'll fix, large holes we replace panels.

But if you're paying someone $50-$75 an hour to repair the rust, you can eat up a lot of money in man hours fixing it. I know someone who has an old Dodge that was so rotted that they've had to replace the front crossmember in the frame, fabricate all new floors, body supports, and replace sheetmetal up about 6 inches all the way around the quarters, doors, etc. Being a Dodge it isn't a Ford where you can pick up the phone and buy patch panels, I'm talking refabricate METAL. The body just went back on the frame yesterday, and at $35 an hour shop rate, the labor bill on this car has topped $40,000, plus parts and materials. This car still needs to have the fenders, doors, hood and trunk painted and hung as well as full installation of the wiring harness, hanging the chrome, replacing and installing all new glass, a new top, and the entire interior. By the time this car hits the showfield, the cost of this car will easily have topped $80,000 between labor and materials.

The guy who is doing the work on this Dodge just bought a Chrysler that is the same year, same body style that is an AACA Senior winner and two time national award nominee for $35,000 that needed nothing but license plates.

Have fun fixing rust, while you're still fixing, we'll be out driving. If you're paying someone by the hour to fix the rust, you'll most likely have as much money in it as the person who bought the car without the rust.

Of course you do what you can afford, and if you can't afford it, you do your own work and do the best you can do. But in the case of this Dodge, if it were mine I would've scrapped it, but this guy is most likely going to pay $80,000 for a car that I wouldn't have towed home. Send that car to a high priced restoration shop, you could easily put the price of that restoration into the six figures.

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remember years ago at Hershey stopping to discuss a badly rusted car at a space and everyone was saying it wasn't even a viable parts car when a visitor from England entered the fray and said " You Yanks are spoiled, in England if there is anything 12 inches below the door handles we've got an easy restoration"

I THINK THAT WAS ME AT HERSHEY WHO SAID THAT! I CERTAINLY SAID WORDS TO THAT EFFECT WHEN LOOKING AT A REALLY ROUGH 1937 BUICK CONVERTIBLE COUPE THAT WAS BEATEN ON EVERY PANEL AND HAD NO FLOOR, AND SINCE THEN I HAVE RESTORED ONE THAT WAS WORSE, TO A DEGREE I AGREE WITH EX98THDRILL WE DON'T HAVE THE FANTASTIC CHOICE YOU HAVE IN THE US, SO BUY SOMETHING BETTER, BUT BY THE SAME TOKEN WAR SCRAP DRIVE SURVIVORS ESPECIALLY AMERICAN ARE RARE HERE AND WORTH MORE, SO THERE IS A GREAT SATISFACTION IN BRINGING SOMETHING BACK FROM THE DEAD.

STEVE

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