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oldodgeboys

Is there a Registry for Unrestored Driver DB's?

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My 25 DB is generally un-restored and on the road (when its not being fixed!). I want to keep it going while respecting the history it represents.

This approach seems to be only a small sub-set of the old car crowd; most people want to restore the cars.

Does anyone know who else is doing the same thing and is there a registry or something else out there for this?

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There is no registry for people who cruise in "original condition", "as found" or "unrestored condition" cars or trucks. The Horseless Carriage Club of America and the WPC Club (Walter Percy Chrysler) are two of the best clubs I know for "bringing what you got". A lot of us out there cannot afford a rotisserie restoration and must work on them as we cruise or simply keep them up well enough to drive. Clubs as small as the "State of Jefferson Antique Auto Club" here in southern Oregon welcomes all condition cars. Heck, you don't even have to OWN an old car to be in our club. Some unmolested or unrestored cars are better to not restore. A lot of the original condition cars are where we get our important information from as far as what they did at the factory and how they did it. As on the Antiques Roadshow...sometimes the patina is better left on the object to retain it's originality and worth.

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I like your thinking. The closest thing I know of to what you describe is the HPOF class in AACA. Historic Preservation of Original Features is HPOF. The cars are not point judged but certified to be original in several areas, interior, paint, etc. My '29 sedan will be left as close to original as I can, changeing belts, hoses, tires, etc.

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Yes, exactly, the car is left (factory) original with maintenace as required to keep it on the road.

<span style="font-style: italic">Its a matter of respecting history.</span>

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A friend of mine picked up a 1914 touring car with 6,000 original miles. He originally was going to restore it, but friends talked him into not touching it except to maintain it and to drive it. It is a museum piece, but a driving example of an early car that should be enjoyed. It still has all of the original paint,pinstriping and leather seats (all very nice with patina). What a GREAT example of what was done at the factory. The license plate on it is 1919!!

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The DB I own is also "unrestored" with only having the fan hub replaced and the vacumn pump repaired since coming out of storage last year (where it had been since the late 1940's). I also am planning on not touching it or doing much restoration to it except to keep it in drivable condition (and possibly to re-upholster the seats as they are very worn). I was told the car had the only two upgrades available at the time ( a rear "heater" and the solid disk wheels (not wood spoke)). Other that that the original owner replaced the headlights with sealed beam ones in the early thirty's (I have the originals) Painted it black in the early forties, and put the second set of tires on it in the early to mid forties (which are still on the car). It's a pleasure to drive but disappointing to go to car shows where everyone goes WOW when they see it but it never wins a award because everyone wants the "shiny" factor (restored, new paint, new engine, supe'd up) type cars and no one seems to have an original category anymore. I just say that it's there loss because historical cars like this are far and few in between and anyone willing to keep them as such should be acknowledged for their efforts in keeping them that way. It's sad to see the old cars become chopped or turned into speedsters etc... which ruins a classic car's history in my view (but if the car was going to be destroyed or sent to the compacter it's better off a roadster then totally and irreplacably lost forever!)...John

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