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war/prewar american street scene pictures?


Mika Jaakkola

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Curti</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Count the cars with white walls. </div></div>

You are right, they are few and far between, but I had a few old photos of Studebakers that have white walls, mostly 30s.

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Anybody know what the first two trucks are? I love that roadster cut into a pickup to the right of the first truck. I've seen many of these as derelict parts cars years later but this is the first in use photo I've seen.

Howard Dennis

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<span style="color: #3333FF">I`m not real sure the roadster was cut. I`ve seen old magazine ads from the 1930s, for a conversion kit. You simply remove the rear deck lid, slide in the box, and bolt it down, and PRESTO!.... an early version of the "El Camino". </span>

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Check out the Upper Mississippi Valey Digital Image Archive:

http://www.umvphotoarchive.org/

It's easy to spend an hour or two going through the old photos. This is a partial catalog of photo collections from several libraries in the Illinois-Iowa region.

The collection I'm most familiar with is at the Musser Public Library in Muscatine Iowa. The Musser Library has a collection of 55,000 negatives from 1887 to 1954 made by local professional photographer Oscar Grossheim. Several thousand of the prints are available for viewing at the library. It's worth a visit if you're in the area.

For my favorite photos search "McColm automobile" and "Littlemac".

The Littlemac was a small car built in Muscatine. There are photos of the factory and the car. No examples of the Littlemac are known to have survived.

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The reason I thought the roadster was cut is to my old eyes all I see is the sides of the quarter panels and no remnants of the area where the trunk/rumble lid meets the panel. Almost all conversions like this I've seen sacrificed the quarters for the added width.Keeping the quarters intact gives you greatly reduced bed size, great for us later restorers,bad for the owner who just wanted to haul something.

Howard Dennis

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