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HELP. Found a 32 Chrysler - Whats it worth?


kevinmorgan
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THIS CAR IS NOW ON EBAY

Here is a link to the auction

I am updating this post from 2008....

OK, lets fast forward from 2008 to now. The car didnt get listed to sell back in 08 and now we are looking for a value again. Any help would be appreciated to get a fair price for this car in its current condition. It has been modified...front frame & suspension has been changed, wrong front bumper & extra lights & horns, wrong steering wheel and gauge cluster, we were told the rear end has been changed. There is no interior. The top is in sad shape as you can see. The flathead 6 isnt original & is set up. Please just help us put a value on this car in its current condition. Thank you in advance. Here are some current photos.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]209633[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]209632[/ATTACH]

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]209641[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]209642[/ATTACH]

(THIS WAS MY ORIGINAL POST FROM 2008)

Here are a bunch of pictures of a 32 chrysler I found. If anyone can come up with a value in its current condition, I would certainly appreciate it. Please email me millstone@cyber-quest.com Thanks!

Any info on this car would be helpful as well, whats missing, whats wrong, etc.

Thanks,

Kevin

here are the pictures.

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Edited by Kevin Morgan (see edit history)
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Wow! Nice find... AND A ROADSTER, NO LESS!!! Any car from 1932 is a great find, but Chrysler has to be right up there near the top of the list as far as sportiness is concerned. Although it is not a top-of-the-line Chrysler being the 6-cylinder CI series, a roadster is a real desirable car.

The car appears to be quite complete, except for seats, steering wheel and front bumper. You'll need to find some headlight parts to replace those seal beam units, and the horns don't quite look right.

On that note, this car does not appear to be one for novice restorers. It needs EVERYTHING, and a great deal of rust repair. It is definitely worthy of a correct and authentic restoration, but the downside is that if a professional does it, you'll have more money into it than its worth (not that there's anything entirely wrong with that, unless you're doing this to make money... in which case, many would tell you to find a better way to make money).

It's tough to put a number on it, but without doing any checking around, my first thought would be $10-15,000.

Keep us informed as to what happens, and come back often with updates on its restoration.

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West,

Good eye! Something doesn't look quite right there. At first I thought it was just that huge, not correct bumper with the override hardware on top, but the pictures look like the front wheel i too far to the rear. All other pictures I've found of '32 Chryslers have the front tire centered in the fender arch. Maybe it's just the angle and the fact that the wheel is turned to the left. Need to be looked at square.

You are correct. This car needs everything and won't be an inexpensive restoration. I think that $10K is a bunch for this. Thinking somewhere closer to $7K. But done right it could be a high dollar car.

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Bob picked up on the same thing I thought, a South American car. The shop where I used to work did several of these South American cars, Model A's and a 1931 Chrysler 6 roadster. I suppose you could get lucky and get a good one but I have yet to see one! The Chrysler had drums worn through with bands welded on the outside. The car had a mulitude of broken studs and the repair was move over a 1/4 inch and drill and tap a new hole. Imagine how this worked out on the head , manifold and brake drums. The ring gear was from a Jeep and since the bolts were either sheared off or didn't match they just drilled new holes, put new longer bolts all the way through and HOT peened the other side. The chassis was so bad we gave up and the customer bought an $7,000.00 coupe as a parts car. That left us with a roadster body that had the entire rumble seat area torched out to make a pickup, then a real craftsman had hand formed all the torched out parts and it was returned to a roadster. As if things weren't bad enough this reincarnation had then been slammed in the rear by who knows what?,maybe a train! and then that mess was heated up and pulled somewhat back into a roadster. Think we used some filler in that restoration?? I'd REALLY check this car over good, TWICE. Good Luck, Howard Dennis

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Yeah. It'd be hard to walk away from a roadster, but that's probably the best thing to do in this case. The idea of a sedan parts car, though, might make it more doable. It needs to be a very complete sedan, too, as MrP is right, that dash needs to be replaced. Perhaps a coupe would be a better parts car, as the seats might be more compatible.

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While it's quite true a total and accurate restoration is very expensive and time consuming if a person is mechanically inclined and otherwise likes to work with his hands restoring a car, even to original specs, cannot always, nor should it be, measured in dollars and cents. A tremendous amount of satisfaction and pride is gained in completing such a project.

I'd rather see a car like this with an amateur restoration then it being allowed to rot away to nothing.

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Thanks for posting the pictures. It is an interesting car. The inspection sticker with a Jan 31, 1971 expiration date indicates the car was inspected and in the U.S. in 1970. There were not that many South American cars in the U.S. at that time as vehicles manufactured in the 1930s were not as relatively expensive as they are today. Also, the Pennsylvania special number tag is ususally an indication the engine was replaced.

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My price guide gives a value of $1200 to $2000 depending on model. That is for a rumble seat roadster parts car which is what it is.

If it is a CI 6 cylinder second series 1932, the book value is $1360. If it was classed "restorable" it would be $4000 but too many parts are missing. I don't suppose the seller has the missing parts?

This is the most valuable and desirable body style. So it might be worth buying in spite of the work and expense it would take to restore it.

A sedan parts car would be around half as much.

A real nice restored one, but not a show car, would be $25000 to $30000.

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$1,200 to $2,000?????? I'll take a dozen! I'd buy that without a doubt for around $5,000 and be smiling all the way home. That car would easily sell in many circles for between 8,000 and 10,000. A rodder would not think twice about that buggered front frame because most of that stuff would get thrown away. Looks like a Lincoln front bumper from about 1950.

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That would break $8,000 on ebay real easy and it's a safe bet a Hot Rodder will win it. There is a nice twin to it in LA now with a 392 Hemi<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: James427</div><div class="ubbcode-body">$1,200 to $2,000?????? I'll take a dozen! I'd buy that without a doubt for around $5,000 and be smiling all the way home. That car would easily sell in many circles for between 8,000 and 10,000. A rodder would not think twice about that buggered front frame because most of that stuff would get thrown away. Looks like a Lincoln front bumper from about 1950. </div></div>

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$1,200 to $2,000?????? I'll take a dozen!

My thoughts exactly. I don't know, that car doesn't look that bad to me. There is some rust, but it seems typical of the rust that is regularly repaired on, much cheaper and less valuable, Fords. It is, by no means, A rust bucket. I'm sure a parts car or a replacement frame could be located without breaking the bank. I looks like a, relatively, easy restoration. It deserves to be saved. Hell, I'd rather see it get rodded, than ignored, because someone thinks it's too far gone. IMHO

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: mrpushbutton</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Looks like a later model year instrument cluster and steering wheel as well.

Lot O' money out the door if they <span style="font-weight: bold">GAVE</span> it to you. </div></div>

Have any idea how many cars have been scrapped because of people with that attitude?

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The way I read everything the hard core AACA view is that there is more wrong with the vehicle than right, if a restoration is what you want. The Hot Rodders view is an unusual roadster body, hood and grill that will turn heads when finished. If the car hits eBay a Rodder will buy it. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Vertigo</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'm confused trying to understand your point. confused.gif

Pushbutton isn't copping an attitude here. He's stating a fact. </div></div>

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Pontiac59</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The last I knew, people restored cars because they love them, not because they're some kind of investment to make money on. Otherwise no one would restore them, they'd all build hot rods and take them to Barrett-Jackson. </div></div>

If one matter-of-factly points out that it's going to cost a lot of money, that's an attitude? No... that's helping the original poster understand what he's getting himself into.

If <span style="font-style: italic">I</span> may read between <span style="font-style: italic">your</span> lines, you'd rather everyone jump into this hobby with their eyes wide shut? confused.gif

I love this car. If I had the time and space, I'd jump in and do it knowing full well it would be a lot less expensive to go out and buy one already done. If I were new to the hobby, I'd surely appreciate someone pointing that out so that I could make an educated decision.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Vertigo</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If I were new to the hobby, I'd surely appreciate someone pointing that out so that I could make an educated decision.</div></div>

And that is what should be done, especially with a car in this kind of condition. It is a lot easier to picture it as a 400 point, fully restored show car than it is to pay for and work to get it there. And to jump into a project like this the person needs to do some research on what it is going to take to do anything at all to it.

Now if money and time are no object, what the heck. cool.gif

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if it was in New Zealand and if i could find the money to buy it it would be in my workshop now , i have seen cars 10 times worse than this restored ,my 39 DeSoto was one of them it came from a thermal area and the sulpher was rusting it from the inside , i did some research and found that dodge and chrysler used the same basic body and managed to find a good dodge body, it is now getting close to being finished after a lot of work and frustations . the point i am try ing to make after going about it the long way , is as long as you don't expect to make money out of it and can do a lot of the work your self, as some one else commented the fun is working on them and then driving them later

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After sitting in a farmers hay field for almost 15 years my nephew found a 65 skylark gs that my wife bought in 68. It had sunk in the mud clear to the frame. The floors where gone,trunk was gone frame was rotted,evan the main support under the package tray was rotted and the car was in danger of collapse. Wife cryed like she had lost a famly member when she saw it. Nothing was usable,but except for a carb, it was compleat. We drug it home and the laughter started. My kids all thought I should be commited, body shop said it couldnt be saved,neighbors had a fit about it being in my back yard and called code inforcement AND I LIVE IN THE COUNTRY!!!! I told them all to go to hell and started a restoration. I done about 3/4 of the work myself and it took me almost 10 years to the day,but she sports a senior tab on her grill and aint nobody laughing now. I dont drive it in the rain cause my nose is so high I might drown. Could I sell it and get my money back?? I doubt it,but thats not why I built it.I can look at it and say damm, she,s pretty and I done it.The diffacult at once the impossable next, grab that 32 and go for it.

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Look, none of my cars are 100% factory by any means! I get them running and running good, to where I could drive them everyday if I wanted to! (and I have! Before I moved farther out from work and school) Anyway, mine have some funky stuff like on My Dodge, my grandpa painted the woodgrained dashboard red in the 50's to make it look modern and I have an aftermarket Speedo hanging from under the dash (to keep track of mileage so, I dont run out of gas like I did one time! LOL!) the '48 has a Mercury Engine put in in the 1950's, the Mustang has a non stock radio, the 1921 Chevy has the exahaust pipe tied up with Bailing wire (which you cant see!, I tied it up, cause I didnt want to drill holes in the car) The MKV and the Buick are the only ones that are orig. and they are not classics. So, get it running and running good and then worry about the particulars later. Also, I think that cars that are less than 400 point showcars and ones that are driven have more personality anyway!

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  • 5 years later...

OK, lets fast forward from 2008 to now. The car didnt get listed to sell back in 08 and now we are looking for a value again. Any help would be appreciated to get a fair price for this car in its current condition. It has been modified...front frame & suspension has been changed, wrong front bumper & extra lights & horns, wrong steering wheel and gauge cluster, we were told the rear end has been changed. There is no interior. The top is in sad shape as you can see. The flathead 6 isnt original & is set up. Please just help us put a value on this car in its current condition. Thank you in advance.

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Edited by Kevin Morgan (see edit history)
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