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on my 2.2 turbo2 auto oil pressure gage starts out fine and read's fine after about 10 minutes gage drops when idleing or shows low pressurs unless on highway any idea's anyone all my other tc's are 3.0S i am gessing oil sending gage or bad oil pump don't know location of either. any idea's thank you

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The 'book' says the 2.2's only need 12PSI oil pressure at idle to stay happy, I don't think the idiot light comes on til 8 eek.gif Cleaning/checking connections like 16V suggested may fix the problem, plus the sendors do go bad especially if there is oil seepage at the wire end of the unit.

If those fail, run thicker oil or a bottle of Lucas with each change. Ya gotta pull the oil pan to replace an oil pump. Not too tough but not exactly an easy job if you haven't done one.

Alan

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Mike , Touching on what Alan said, I run 4 quarts of Mobil Delvac 1300 15W-40 oil in my engine along with 1 pint of STP. Heavier weight oil is not just what you are looking for but one that is also formulated for turbocharged engines. 15W-40 is suggested in the owners manual as a choice of oil. Check the temperature ranges to see if it is applicable for you. Good luck, David

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Hey Guys be very very carefull how heavy (thick) the oil is that you run in a turbo. That turbo turns up 20,000+ RPM and the shaft bushings have a clearance of only .0015 when up to temperature.. My choice is always 10/30 Mobil 1. Lou

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Look a few inches below and to the right of the upper radiator hose coming from the cylinder head. See the little fitting protruding from the engine block, it has a small silver hardline oil line that goes up then over along the drivers side of the cylinder head? That is the oil feed for the turbo. the sender is also on that fitting. 89 may be silver 'bell'shaped or black and the size of a roll of quarters depending on your build date. It has one or two wires going to it. Bingo, sender.

Alan

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twin cam, if you still have your owners manual, look in it. 15W-40 is recommended as a choice and as you are correct about it being for diesel engines, I run it in my Dodge's and my Kenworth's. 15W-40 is also recommended for gasoline turbocharged engines.

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Ya gots me mixed up with that other guy David, I am all about the thicker oil. It was some other know-it-all that threatend the heavier oil would tear up our turbos or some othersuch malarky. I just left that one alone, you never can change a know-it-all's mind anyway wink.gif

Alan

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Alan, sorry for the mix up. It was 89TC-16V. I have had lots of experience with turbocharged engines, not counting the itsi bitsi one in my TC that could be used for a starter motor. I even ran 15W-40 in some race engines we built back during my round track days. Never have I had an oil related engine failure.

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i run 10W-30 synthetic in all my turbos, thats 4-2.2Ls, of which one is a 408 whp, 442ft lb trq 16V monster. 15W-40 is way too heavy in my opinion to push through small oil passages and lines, maybe on a 3.0L, but never a 2.2L. why they have that in the 89s book is beyond me, i have the books for all my other cars they say 10W-30. i would think 15W-40 is a little heavy considering what chrysle has to say about the oil in the book

just for kicks pulled directly from my 89 owners manual page 83. SAE 5W-30 is the oil preferred for use in all engines within the operating temps show. you are highly encouraged to use SAE 5W-30 to aid in low temp starting and for improved vehicle fuel economy. SAE 10W-40 and 10W-50engine oils are not recommended for use on Chrysler motors vehicles. these should never be used in turbocharged engines

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That's pretty much what I read from different manufacturers in the '60s. but of course we mostly ran single weight 10w, or 20w, real hot long runs 30w. At that time we also played with special hydrolic lifters on different hydrolic and solid lifter cams, running anywhere beween .002 & .004 clearance. we found at that time in almost all installations 20w Castrol gave us 400 more RPM before lifter pump-up, than any other oil.. Just another old timer rambling, Lou

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I never said anything about 10W-40 or 10W-50. I said simply 15W-40. Can you atleast acknowledge I am not out of my mind. It is in the book. Further more I hope you do not believe just because it has a turbocharged diesel in it 15W-40 is the oil. Try that in an older Detroit and you will destroy it. SAE 30 is what you had best use, non detergent on top of that. You may believe 15W-40 is way too heavy for your torque monster and I say that tongue in cheek but it is more than sufficient to answer the original question. Perhaps we should just let the fella make up his own mind because you and I will never reach an end.

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if 10W-40 and 10W-50 are not recommended, what makes you think 15W-40 is any better? its a good deal heavier, thats only going to make the oil pump work harder when the temps are lower, if you live in the desert, its probably fine, but the rest of the world running that in a turbo, you are gonna roast the turbo if the stuff cant pump to it before you start driving or the bearings unless you let the engine warm up for 10 min if its not 70+ outside. not to mention heavy oil in a turbo isnt much better for the main seal, ppl have blown them out of the block running it because they rather put heavy oil in than change the bad pump or main bearings. obviously its his choice what he wants to use, he can stick gear oil in it for all i care, i posted what the book says, does not say run 15W-40, its part of the chart for the Sahara, Gobi, Death Valley and certain parts of Iran, its says 5W-30 is the recommended oil, 15W-40 is not the next oil heavier in weight. This is a 2.2L 4cyl from the 80s, not a 50-70s V8, these cars dont have solid lifters, flat tappet cams, double roller timing chains or 4 barrel holley carbs. I've dealt with over 10 of these 2.2Ls over the past few years, i have yet to have any problems running 10W-30 in any of them, low mile, high mile, turbo fuel injected or Carbed.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> if 10W-40 and 10W-50 are not recommended, what makes you think 15W-40 is any better? </div></div>

Why don't you look at the image YOU posted a picture of? The chart that reads "Recommended viscosity grades"? Look at what is 2nd from the top.... <span style="font-weight: bold">15w40</span>

Your own data, dude.

post-51335-143137992091_thumb.jpg

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I know you may find it hard to believe being from the highly intellectual center of the country (NJ) but Virginia is not part of the Sahara not in California's Death Valley. Read the chart that you so proudly posted the picture of and tell me if the temperature ratings for 15W-40 do not range from +10 degrees to 100+ degrees. I know we are not as bright down here as ya'll are up there, but I can read a chart.

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C'on guys and gals, we're discussing oil. Lets not get in a snit over it. We all can read the manual, and we all also know the manual is infallible! Right?

I personally wouldn't use anything heavier than 10W-30 and most often use 5W-30, but lets face it, if someone is comfortable using gear oil, what the hell! After all we all live in different parts of the continent and operate under dozens of conditions. Let's shake and makeup!

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run what you will but dont expect a Jiffy Lube or anyplace else to put that in your car, they would get sued when it blows a seal or the turbo and when they look at the recommended oil, it doesn't say 15W-40

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I would hardly use Jiffy Lube as an expert reference for ANYTHING to do with a car. You couldn't pay me to take my worst enemy's car there.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> when they look at the recommended oil, it doesn't say 15W-40 </div></div>

That is of course assuming the guy at JL can even read.

That being said, your own image shows very plainly that 15w40 is in fact a RECOMMENDED oil. That is the title of the chart, correct?

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Hey Tom,

There is a good bit of difference in ambient temperature between us. Southside Virginia is 100 deg. everyday. I am s writing at 11:45 PM the temp on my deck overlooking the water is 85. my computer home page reads 83. Car_Chick is a little north of me.

I personally would not run anything other than 10/30 unless I was blowing oil, smoking, or something like that and wasn't expecting much more out of the engine anyway. With these temps. they could certainly be OK with the 15/40 but I really would not like it in January or February.. and in Cal. "Fer Surr"

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That's it, I'm gonna buy 5 quarts of 90 weight from AutoStoned in the morning just to see what happens crazy.gif Wait, what was this thread about before the banter grin.gif?

I run the heavier stuff AND some Lucas and have for a long time, it's possible the increased pumping efforts are costing me some milage/power... But I still make plenty of power and don't really closely calculate mileage on the project cars wink.gif

Alan

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My point as well Lou. After all we are having this discussion in the middle of July. When November rolls around I will be back to 10W-30. Those hot "Death Valley Virginia" temperatures can start to drop very sudden in December. As for you 16V TC and myself, we are just gonna have to agree to disagree and try so as to not be disagreeable. After all are we not all here as a result of a passion of the same interest. I think we can put this subject to rest.

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I've been on a 'few' automotive forums over the years and two subjects universally degrade into hostility, bickering, and "I know better than you do" type of replies. They are:

What type of oil is best/should I use?

And

What type of spark plugs are best/should I use?

Moving onto other aspects of TC ownership...

Alan

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Hey Alan,

Let's see The most animated automotive discussions I have had were with What kind of:

Tires work best.

Gasoline was best,

Oil worked best,

Spark Plugs/Wires/Ignition Systems

and I think the last one is:

Auto Wax/Polish

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Let me qualify the above statement as just my personal opinion. My opinion is in no way meant to sway or influence the attitude of this forum or the TC club. Use of this opinion should be taken with great care and at one's own risk. In no way do I assume responsibility for the use or misuse of the above mentioned personal opinion and can not be held liable. Happy motoring!

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Hey David, What do they call that "Waffleing".??

Oh Yea! and another thing for you folks unfamiliar with Corvair designations.. a "140" is a turbocharged 168 cu. in. air cooled flat4 the first of that configuration engine rolled off the line in 1963.. No fancy boost restrictors were used, they just combined the carbureator venturi size and restrictions in the muffler to safely control boost.. Naturally I installed an oversize carb. and 2"exhaust with glasspack muffler. ~ And ~ yes david let it idle 2 minutes before shut down.. Lou

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LouZ</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey David, What do they call that "Waffleing".??

Oh Yea! and another thing for you folks unfamiliar with Corvair designations.. a "140" is a turbocharged 168 cu. in. air cooled flat4 the first of that configuration engine rolled off the line in 1963.. No fancy boost restrictors were used, they just combined the carbureator venturi size and restrictions in the muffler to safely control boost.. Naturally I installed an oversize carb. and 2"exhaust with glasspack muffler. ~ And ~ yes david let it idle 2 minutes before shut down.. Lou </div></div>

I hate to disagree with you but the first turbo Corvairs were 145 cu in flat sixes with 150 hp. The 65 and later were 168 cu in flat sixes. The 140 hp had four single barrel carbs and the turbo also has 168 cu in but with 180 hp

Used to drive them you see.......................Griz

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You are correct, my typing speed got ahead of my brain speed. I had 13 Corvairs at one time, two of which were my daily drivers both of show quality; but kickers just the same. All configurations started as 143 cu. in. engines. The powerhouses were 4 carbs. or turbos. They started in "late" '63 models called Spyders then when the body style changed in '64 (model year '65) the engines changed to 164 cu. in. & they call them Corsas The 4 carb were rated at 140 hp, the turbos were rated at 180 hp. the faster cars were the 4 carb 140s. when the intakes and exhaust sustems on the turbos were opened up, then top end was limited only by the cars aero. Putting on a large stiff airdam in the front helped a lot; but we didn't have any knowledge of side skirts yet.. The 140s were still faster off the line. Sorry about the miss info, Lou (old & sometimes confused)

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