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Wow! Very nice Aussiehupp, I sure like roadsters. Looks like you have a ways to go. Keep us posted on your progress. Pete, I'll take your advice on the taper. My handles are .050" wider than the originals. I figured I'd leave a little extra for finishing/sanding, good eye.

I've been using the wrong end mills for cutting aluminum and it has slowed me down. But today I was digging through some stuff and found a few boxes with the right cutters. I forgot I had these. Back in the 1990s most of the manufacturing facilities in the Bay Area were going out of business. There were two or three auctions a week - for years. A lot of the older machines and equipment were sold for scrap. I managed to set up my shop from these sales.

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The right cutter made a big difference. In this picture I'm using a turn table to shape the escuchen.

lockescuchen.jpg

Here I'm using the turn table to shape the side. I ended up taking off too much material and had to throw this one out.

lockescuchen1.jpg

I'd like to put a lock on one of the handles.

locks.jpg

I drilled a hole in a handle and threaded it. Unfortunately, the lock looks nasty, sort of like a wart. I guess I should have found a flush type lock. Too late, I'm going to try and counter sink it some.

lock1.jpg

Used the lathe to machine a countersink and also worked on the other area there.

lock2.jpg

Here it is on the car, without the escutcheon. I think it'll look OK once I buff it out. These handles aren't costing me much, but it's taking a lot of time. I'll probably try something different on the next restoration.

lock3.jpg

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Dean

I have been working on the timber work for the roadster since November last year. At the same time I have been using the lost wax process to make moulds for most of the pot metal parts originally used on the car. I then take a wax impression of the part to the foundry where it is cast in silicon bronze. If you do another restoration I would recommend that you look into the lost wax process. It certainly helps if you have a friendly art foundry nearby. I have attached another photo taken today of progress on the timber work. Alan

post-60658-143138049303_thumb.jpg

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Aussiehup

What a great re-wood job you've done. It looks great and it's obvious you are very talented. I've just got done working on re-wooding the top of my Durant and it was a chore to get everything right and get the doors to fit etc. Mine sue does not look as good as yours. Really nice job!

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Fantastic wood work Alan! Very impressive, and you only started a few months back??? If your body fits well and the doors close, that's it, I'll stop posting pictures of mine and go into hiding. grin.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dean_H.</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Fantastic wood work Alan! Very impressive, and you only started a few months back??? If your body fits well and the doors close, that's it, I'll stop posting pictures of mine and go into hiding. grin.gif </div></div>

Dean....don't even tease us with the horrible thought that you will stop posting pictures of your car! That thought is way too scary to think about.

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re keiser31's comment;

Dean - my sentiments exactly. Please do not stop posting pictures of your work. It was your postings which inspired me to get cracking with the roadster after it had been sitting in the shed for many years!.

The doors do fit but the back body shell needs some "persuasion" to come close to fitting well. More refinement of the timber work and probably remaking rusted sections of the shell are still in front of me

re backyardmechanic's comment:

Vern; like Dean I too drop pot metal parts and they always @#$%^ break. I recently dropped the long thin centre piece which goes on top of the front cowl and it broke into three pieces. If I can figure out how to start a new thread I will post photos of making a new part. I have attached a photo of the part Araldited back together. Alan

post-60658-143138049579_thumb.jpg

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I just watched a posted video of Jay Leno's CNC machine making parts in seconds. Doh! Oh well... poor people have poor ways, I finally got one door handle mostly done, still need to bevel the escutcheon for the ring and buff it a little more. It's not too clear in the pic, but there is a slight taper on the handle base. It looks presentable on the car.

handle10.jpg

Took a break from the handles and sanded down a hood panel.

hood.jpg

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Dean,

The handle looks immaculate, great work as always.

Re backyardmechanic's comment

Vern,

I have started a new thread about the lost wax process. If you type in lost wax in the search box in the upper left of the screen you will find it. I had some problems with file sizes and loaded one photo twice and had a phantom photo appear from nowhere!

Alan

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Dean,

Beautiful work on that handle. Sure wish I had a setup like u have. If you keep up with the pace you are going at you will be done in no time.

Isn't it fun sanding down them louvers on that hood panel. smirk.gif I wore my nails down last summer sanding mine.

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You're right Pack31, those louvers are a headache. But lately I prefer sanding to machining. The handles were a bit more trouble than I thought, and it's sort of burned me out. I've been working on my hood for a change of pace. Unfortunately, I have something I need to do for the next couple of weeks and won't be working much on the car.

I did finish one handle completely, even clear coated it. In this pic I'm using a very thin cutter to make a slot for a snap ring.

handle12.jpg

Making the rings. After this pic was taken, I drilled a hole down the center and they fell off one at a time.

handle11.jpg

Here are all the parts. I didn't take any more pictures, but I did finish it up and installed it on the car.

handle13.jpg

And this last picture is of the car after I stuck half the hood on. They say it's not over til the fat lady sings. Well...she's starting to warm up her voice.

hoodhalf.jpg

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I'm back, the small construction job I'm doing was delayed for a couple days, so I've been tinkering with my car. I want to be able to lock the door, even if the lock is wimpy. I have no idea how they do this in the real world, but I decided to make a mini crank shaft in the lock mechanism. I had welded a 5/16 bolt to the bottom of my lock earlier. In this first pic I have cut the bolt to size and have it clamped in the vise to drill the offset hole.

handle16.jpg

I used a piece of 1/8" welding rod to make the tiny connecting rod needed. A small nail holds the connecting rod in place. It's hard to see in the picture, but I still have enough threads left to hold the shaft.

handle15.jpg

Here's a couple pictures of the key locked and unlocked. I couldn't put a taper on this handle shank, because with the lock hole it was getting thin. I suspect everyone is sick at looking at all these handle pictures, I promise, it's almost over. smile.gif

handle17.jpg

handle18.jpg

And the ole wart handle on the car, after I buffed it out. Two down - two to go.

handle14.jpg

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We never get bored with this project. You are an amazing fabricator and your car looks great. Almost there. I'm getting concerned that after you're finished we will all go in withdrawal. What's your next project? Keep up the great work.

Ed

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Thanks for the comments guys. Kieser, I'm afraid your wife isn't correct. You'd educate me, I'm a lightweight on old cars. I certainly still intend to post pictures of progress on the car, but I figured the handles might be getting too much attention. Little things seem to take the most time. In about an hour the body can be put on the frame and it looks like real progress is being made. On the other hand, making handles take a week, but doesn't look like much.

I'm currently working on a construction project, but I was able to get a few things done on the car in the evenings. The handles never seem to end. I had two more escutcheons to make. Believe it or not the escutcheons are very time consuming to make (and hard to pronounce).

In this pic I'm rough cutting the pieces

escuheons.jpg

I don't waste too much time on the back sides and they look a little rough.

escucheon1.jpg

Making a countersink on the screw holes. I didn't take pictures of the lathe work. But the reason I made the arbor was to hold it in the lathe, it also holds it for this work.

escucheons2.jpg

All the handles are now done (one is on the car). These three need to be polished a little more and clear coated. The doors have a large enough hole to allow for the nut on the squared off shaft. This makes it easy for me to position the shaft where needed and lock it with the nut. I'll also put some loctite on the threads for good measure

handles.jpg

I'm having a hard time getting a good closeup picture of a handle. My wife took this one outside on the patio using her fancy dancy 20D Cannon with L lens. Hopefully it's clear enough for any critics to come out of the woodwork grin.gif

handle20.jpg

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As a late arrival to this project, I'm glad I didn't have to wait for the pictures during the first 3/4 period of this project. I just reviewed them and read with interest all of the entries. Now, I'm hooked and find myself checking this site day to day. Nice work!

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No critics here, just a bunch of guys really really enjoying the amazing fabrication you're doing. PLEASE keep up the updates and thanks for doing this restoration, it sure keeps me motivated on mine which isn't near as involved.

Seeing that nothing stumps you makes my obstacles much easier to deal with...no more whining from ME...just git 'er done!!!

Those handles should be framed, by the way!! wink.gif

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Dean: I just stumbled onto this site and I have been reading the posts of your project for a couple days now. Nice work and I am impressed with your ingenuity on the challenges of this type project. I am a new user to this forum so it may take a little while to figure it out. What this message is about is I have found a very nice survivor 1929 Hupmobile 4 passenge coupe. It has some wood rot at the top roof area, and bottom of the doors, but is very solid and straight other wise. I am very skilled at wood work so that does not worry me. What I am worried about is parts and info. The worst part of the car is the hood. It is rusted out at the hinge on both sides almost the full length of the hood. It must have been a bad design as the rest of the car is virtually rust free. Is a hood going to be avaible or will I have to fix the hinge. I can get the car for about 7000.00 dollars. It runs well and appears to be mostly complete. I think the only missing parts are the controls in the center of the steering wheel and the vacumn tank. It also has dual sidemounts. I am new to Hupmobiles. What was there target area of sales ?? Were they on the same level as Cadillac, Lincoln or Packards Pearless ect. I am not new to the hobby as I have restored several cars. I have done both full restorations and (don't hate me) Hot Rods and Street Rods. I have just retired and I am looking for one more project. I found out a long time ago it is better to do one at a time. So this Hupp may be it. I guess what I am asking is for some imput as to the resources that are out there to help in the restoration. As a final thought I may be going to keep the car as a survivor and fix the small amount of wood, the hood, and re-uphoulster. I will then do a mechanical rebuild of the chassis for safty and dependability. Any imput you or others may give will be appreciated. Keep up the good work.... From an Arkansas hillbilly..... Donnie...

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Thanks for the kind words guys, congrats dobro on finding a decent Hupp. Hupmobile is not a full classic type car like the Packards, Cadillacs and Lincolns. Those cars sold new in the $3-5K range. Hupmobile sixes were priced around $1K. While Ford, Chevrolet, and Dodge were priced a bit lower at about $4-700. Hupmobile was considered a pretty fast car in the day. No design problem with the hoods, you just found a rusted one. You might find another hood at a swap meet if you look hard enough, I'd probably just fix the one you have. I never consider the difficulty of finding parts when buying an old car. Get the car you like. Good luck in your efforts.

I've been busy, but I did a couple of small things on the Hupp. I wanted to get the firewall done in the interior so I could run wires and cables. I had some door panel board that looked like it would work. Trying to save money, I looked for some insulation I could borrow. This XJS had just what I needed. I bought this car a few months back for it's suspension. V12 Jags are a dime a dozen here in CA, because most fail smog checks.

xjs1.jpg

Removing some insulation from under the hood

xjs.jpg

Cutting the pieces

firewall1.jpg

Glued it together

firewall2.jpg

And fitting it in the car. There was nothing here when I bought the car, but I suspect it had something similar to this when new.

firewall3.jpg

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I just have to add....I now look at the daunting projects on my 1931 Dodge as much less daunting and actually attainable thanks to you, Dean. The descriptions and details that you give are very inspirational. I realize now that if you look at the project as each small project area instead of seeing the overall "looming beast needing attention", it moves forward easier. Many, many thanks to you for posting in the manner that you do. John

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Dean,

I've followed your resto since the beginning and continue to be amazed and very impressed by your no-fear approach to problem solving. You made my day today stripping out a Jag V-12 for the good of the Hupp! What are you planning to use the Jag suspension on?

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Kieser, The black/gray stuff is called panel board. I bought it a few months back from an upholstery shop near me. My car has this material for door panels (covered with upholstery). I looked it up on the internet and it is available from some upholstery places for about 12 bucks a sheet. But shipping is expensive because of size. The Mom and Pop shop charged me $18. There are two kinds available, the light brown stuff is not waterproof. Good luck and keep those Dodges running smile.gif

TexRiv, I have a hot rodded '51 Chevrolet P/U, I put together in the 1980s. It has the original front suspension and handles poorly. The '87 XJS has four wheel independent with disc brakes all the way around. The rear end is a Dana 44 with posi-traction. It'll make a good set-up.

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Dean, I have been following your restoration since you started posting about it.

While I never saw this type of precision work come out of the shop, watching this discussion brings back fond memories of growing up across the street from my father's welding and machine shop. I miss having access to all of those tools in the machine shop.

I have never thought I had anything to add to the discussion, but I figure that I might as well chime in and say that it is nice that you found something good to do with a Jaguar.

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Dean: Thanks for the fast reply. I guess The hood on the coupe I am looking at may have trapped a lot of dirt in the hinge and that caused the rust out. It just seemed strange to have a rusted hood and the rest of the car is almost perfect. I can fix it but was hoping to find a hood or at least a bad hood with a solid hinge area. What are the three controls on the steering column for. The car is not close enough for me to look at. The reason for asking about the target market is that all the ads I have found for the 29s seem to be very upscale. The Hupps seem to be a very elegant car for there price range. The four passenge coupe has a hat box behind the driver seat that I think is neat. Can you suggest any books on the history of the Hupps. I would like to find out a little more about the four passenger coupes. I like the way that you adapt and overcome the issues with the restoration. I have done that with my own projects thru the years. Maybe not to the extent you do, but it is good feeling to get something fixed and not always have to resort to buying a repro part. I have enjoyed following your progress and will look forward to seeing more..... Thanks again.....

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Thanks for chiming in Hinson, I'm afraid any car is at risk in my yard. smile.gif

Dobro, Hupmobile may have attempted to include some of the neat options of more expensive cars but it was not built to compete with the most luxurious of cars. Still a good car however.

Here is a book I'd recommend, it's available at Amazon.

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I've had this book for many years, it's one of my favorites. There is a section on Hupps in it.

book11.jpg

The author is a wonderful fellow and he signed the inside cover for me.

book2.jpg

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Dean: Thanks for the quick reply. I am still thinking about the Hupmobile Coupe for my retirement project, but I may have found a 33 Plymouth Coupe instead. The 33 was the first car I had when I was 18 years old so I am biased toward it. So more than likly I will not try to get it. If you or any of the readers of this forum are interested in the car I can give the contact info for the man that has it. He wants 8000.00 for it and I can not get him to come down. (he will trade for interesting,old orphan,makes of cars) It is a very nice survivor so is probably worth it. Just so everyone knows, I have no connection to the car and I am not trying to make anything from it. Even though I have street rodded some cars, I think the car is too nice for the street rod crowd and hope some restorer ends up with it. It has very,very, little rust, other than the hood hinge area and bottom of both sidemount wells. 90-95% of the wood appears useable as-is. I think the only missing parts are the controls in the center of the steering wheel and the vacumn tank. It runs and the previous owner added a new electric fuel pump. The car is located in central Arkansas. I have enjoyed reading your posts and will still be watching to give me motivation. As you are nearing the end of the long tunnel of restoration, are you planning on doing another project for us to follow.?? Thanks... from Arkansaw.....

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Dean

Just a note to thank you and those who commented on the re-wood of the roadster; which I rudely didn't do when the comments were posted originally. Hope you don't judge all Aussies by my poor manners.

Just for interest, I finished the replacement part I made using lost wax and have attached a photo showing the part and the rubber insert for the end nearest the windscreen.

Alan

post-60658-143138058601_thumb.jpg

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Alan, I was losing sleep thinking about rude Aussies. Glad you cleared that up. grin.gif Of course I'm kidding. I followed your lost wax thread and was amazed at your reproduction quality. This trim piece looks perfect. I'll be attempting some of that work on my interior handles. Thanks for posting the instructions.

That old saying... 'no rest for the weary'. Been working long days but finally finished my little construction job and took home the equipment.

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Only had time for little things on the Hupp. I purchased this BMW shift boot on eBay for $1 (+ $3 shipping). I want to use it for my E-brake.

boot.jpg

Broke off the plastic snap in holder, cut off the too small top and hand sewed a trim piece on.

boot1.jpg

Here is the finished product

boot2.jpg

Did some more electrical work on the car. I solder the terminals.

wire.jpg

Heat shrink tubing makes a nice finished product. My wife caught our yard chicken, the old bugger seems to like it.

Today's my birthday, we're having a big dinner. Don't worry, the spring chicken is safe... BBQing steak. smile.gif

wire2.jpg

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I worked like a mad man on the hood, didn't even stop to take pictures. Greased all the hinge rods - it opens very smooth. Looks pretty good too.

hoodon.jpg

Got started on the trunk

trunk4.jpg

Someone had attempted to JB weld the lid brace on. I cleaned that stuff off.

trunk2.jpg

Getting the torch going to braze it back on.

trunk3.jpg

Looks OK

trunk1.jpg

Also brazed the other corner of the lid. It had some damage, that was hammered out and the original weld had cracked. This is as far as I've gone for now.

trunk.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

It's been a while since I posted progress, I've been a little busy with other stuff. The trunk is coming along, I replaced the wood bottom, the original wood was de-laminating.

trunk5.jpg

The old wood was nailed, but I didn't have any short nails, so used little screws.

trunk6.jpg

The original interior panels looked pretty good and I reused them.

trunk7.jpg

Riveting the hinge back on, and that's about all I've done in the last couple weeks. smile.gif

trunk8.jpg

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After bolting the trunk on, I pushed the car outside to rinse it off. My yard is up wind from the shop and dust is a problem. It'll look clean for a few days. smile.gif Unfortunately, I have a million things to do right now and can't spend much time on the car. I would like to get the dash done next...

What a great looking car!

car.jpg

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