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adam_knox

1949 Chrysler Windsor Oil Filter type and MAACO Paint

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Hey gang,

I used to own a 49 Plymouth Deluxe (second series) and at our local fleet and farm I found the exact match for the fuel filter. Now that I have the 49 Windsor Chrysler (2nd series), I can't seem to find the right filter. The filter it came with wasn't original, and the replacements I've found at NAPA, Advanced Auto Parts, and Autozone, fit over the pipe, but the circumference seems too small for the canister. Can you guys let me know what filter # you use? I've attached a photo at the bottom from my engine compartment in case a previous owner swapped out a different style filter, although it seems to look like it belongs...

On a side note, I've done my restoration budget, and I know I won't be able to do a great paint job for six years. In the meantime, my paint job looks like it was done in the late 60's. There isn't any rust on the car, minus a few slight spots of surface rust on exposed metal where the paint has worn off on the edges of the trunk, doors etc. Wanting it to look semi-quasi decent in summer when I drive it (nice weather only) for the next six years, I was thinking of getting the infamous MAACO $500 dollar paint job. I know they don't exactly get the detailing done right, so I plan on taking off bumpers, hood ornament, etc.. I figure if they get paint on anything, I plan on getting the chrome trim done anyways when I get a proper paint job. I don't think there's any long term or costly restoration problems a cheap MAACO paint job could generally cause, but I thought I check with the wisdom of the board to see if there's anything I'm missing, or if you heed or encourage an "in the meantime" paint job...

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I have the "top of the line" single stage urethane paint job from MAACO on my 64 Galaxie. It is not perfect, but neither is my bodywork. It cost me $1000.00 in 2005 and still shines nice. grin.gif I polish and wax it once a year and use a good detail spray to keep it clean. My car is garage kept under a car cover. You can see photos of it on my website. Just look in my signature.

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Hello Adam,i would go for it,i run a bodyshop myself i cant compete with maaco's prices.Also you should be able to work with the shop as to remove the trim and bumpers,talk to the manager first and see if they are willing to do this.you should be able to get a decent job at a good price, As Maacos painters are pretty good at spraying.I would rather drive a car with a fair paint job,as opposed to parking it. Good Luck Harvey B

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The things that go into a good paint job are:

Removal of all chrome and parts; the paint will start to flake at the edge if it is not under the chrome parts

The amount of surface preparation, it must be clean and sanded well with the proper grit of paper for the paint that is used.

Remove all the chrome and wash the car yourself with a good detergent. Then use a pre-cleaner solvent purchaced at a autobody paint store, using plenty of clean rags (white) before sending it to the refinish shop.

Material; the cheapest paint will last 2-3 years; the best will last 15-20 or more.

Application; the attitude of the man spraying will have the biggest difference in the final looks, He is probably on a fixed $ rate per car. A generous tip before hand will give remarkable results.

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On the subject of oil filters, I have an old Chryco (Canadian Chrysler dealer) parts catalog in front of me.

It lists the oil filter element Chryco #1556 834 for all Chryslers 1946-1955.

In the cross reference section, this matches up to the following: Purolator P-82, AC PF-319,Fram CH-192PL, Kralinator LT-805 or L805,Wix PC-62NP, and Walker Deluxe RC-66 or WD-66.

For the paint job your car seems like the ideal candidate for a home roller paint job.

Before you dismiss the idea, there is a special technique using sponge rollers, and marine enamel that works very well. It involves wet sanding between coats followed by a final polish.

The job is labor intensive but the result is equal to what your car came with when new, or better. The cost is about $100 for materials to do your car.

Here is the original thread that started the whole thing. Others have taken up the idea around the world.

@@@ Oops sorry forgot the link. @@@

Here it is.

http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=2331682&page=0&fpart=1&vc=1

The best results seem to be with the marine enamel rather than Tremclad.

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Unfortunately, the quality of a Maaco paint job (or any other for that matter) is dependent on the individual doing the work. Shortly after the earth cooled, I built a 68 Olds 442. I did all the body work myself, spending months getting the car straight and shooting primer. I blocked the car and took it to Maaco for final paint. I bought the top of the line paint job. They proceeded to respray primer, did not properly sand it, and laid down the heaviest orange peel in the color coat that I had ever seen. Right then and there I vowed to teach myself to spray color, and have painted numerous cars since.

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I used to work for a shop that restored Austin Healeys. The manager of the local Maaco came in one day and tried to hustle our paint business. We laughed at him. He offered to paint a car for us for the cost of materials only. We happened to be finising up a daily driver and asked the owner if it would be OK to give him a shot at it. He said "No problem." The car turned out gorgeous. We took it to the British car meet in SoCal and took a 3rd place trophy

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Wow, that looks nice! I'm going to take the car over there. I read the post on roll-on! What a fantastic idea. I would do the roll on method (i love doing as much as I can myself), but my project list is already too long at the moment. I'm re-sealing the rear floor pans and inside of the doors. There are very few spots of surface rust, so I'm sanding off all the paint to take preventative measures . So unfortunately, I'd like to get it on the roads by June, otherwise I'll never get to enjoy it! But my "classic" 91 Cutlass Ciera with rust accents may be my first trial for the method later this summer. Then seeing how it goes my next paint job on the Chrysler might be the roll on method (then I could actually afford to get the rechroming done sooner if I do it that way!)

Thanks for the cross reference of part #'s for the oil filters. I know I tried the fram, which seemed too small for the canister. I'll post on the Chrysler forum (where I actually thought I posted my first post!). See if any Windsor owners have the same canister as which brand they use.

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"I'm sanding off all the paint to take preventative measures ".

Do not sand off all the paint! This is the worst thing you can do. If the paint is not peeling or rusted through it makes the perfect base for new paint.

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Really? I was under the impression that it would be better to get the metal clean, prep the metal and then coat it with POR 15, or some other primer and then a top coat. Figured that would be better than laying down on top of 60 year old paint...It would make life a heckuva lot easier to just paint over the old stuff though! I just want this car to last until I'm dead, and I plan on living a loooooooooong time! wink.gif At this point the car is so good I don't have to consider doing a frame off on it, so I figured every 20 years I'd be doing preventative an touch up work...Kinda like a dental cleaning every 6 months!

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If the original paint is sound, free of peeling, checking, etc., there is reason to sand it off. You will never be able to put on a better coat of primer, at home, than the 60 year old paint that you now have. I'm 60 and I'm still good.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Leonard Shepherd</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> ...I removed all the chrome and put it back on myself.</div></div> Does it poke you, when you roll over in bed?<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 58Mustang</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If the original paint is sound, free of peeling, checking, etc., there is reason to sand it off. You will never be able to put on a better coat of primer, at home, than the 60 year old paint that you now have.</div></div> Ok, I'm confused.

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Good prep can make bad paint look good. Spraying the finish coat is the least labor-intensive part of the job, and the part that MAACO and places like that excel in. You're on the right track by taking off all that you can possibly remove before taking it in. Disassemble the car as much as possible and as much as they will allow (will they paint the fenders separately, for example).

I would sand the car but not necessarily down to bare metal. I'd use up to perhaps 400 grit to make sure it still has some "tooth" for the primer to stick to. Hopefully they'll use some kind of epoxy primer that will seal the surface and stick to the old paint without reacting with it. If the panels are straight, you can wet sand the car when you get it back to make it perfect.

Does the car need any bodywork? If so, see if they'll let you do the prep before you bring it in (unlikely, but it doesn't hurt to ask). Even as a novice, you can spend the time on it to make it smooth and flat before they start shooting paint.

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Excessive sanding by an amateur can result with spotty "rings" all over the car. Best to only sand evenly all over the car and let Maaco take care of the bad spots.

Of course, if you know nothing about refinishing a car, it is best left to someone who knows what he is doing do it.

I have sprayed many cars that the customer had sanded and most of them did it wrong, causing defects in the final job.

One car I sprayed for the customer was actually was sanded with 36-grit paper “so that it would have a good grip” according to the customer.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Matt Harwood</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Good prep can make bad paint look good.</div></div>

Having painted nearly a dozen cars by myself, I'll disagree. Bad paint will always look bad, however, bad PREP will make even good paint look bad.

As for the bare metal, most 1960s and earlier cars are lacquer paint. Lacquer is not a long-lived paint (despite the anecdotal proof that is sure to follow this statement). It is also somewhat incompatible with most new base coat/clearcoat systems. Taking a car down to bare metal is probably the best path if the car has had multiple paint jobs. Excess thickness is one of paint's worst enemies. The metal and the paint expand and contract a different rates and the thicker the paint, the more stressed it gets when the metal expands. Starting with bare metal lets you know exactly what's under that expensive new paint job and also lets you know exactly how many coats of paint are on the car.

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If I recall correctly Chrysler used pyroxilin enamel in the 40s and 50s, switching to synthetic enamel in the late 50s.

I worked in body shops for years and never stripped a car down unless it had multiple paint jobs or the surface was failing i.e. cracking, peeling or blistering.

The original paint was the least of our worries and never caused a problem.

The problem areas were always in areas of old bodywork where someone had stripped the body to bare metal and repainted from scratch.

The original finish is the best primer provided it is not cracked, rusted through or otherwise failing.

I even developed a technique of grinding off old paint while leaving the original finish. It required a delicate touch with a 5 inch grinder and a fine grit wheel, 80 as I recall.

I have also stripped cars with a razor blade scraper, removing repaints and leaving the original finish. If the repaint is not adhering well you can get about 90% of it off this way.

Every paint company formulates their paints to go over old paint. I have never had a repaint lift original factory paint.

I should add that I got out of the body shops 15 years ago due to health problems. So you might want to talk to a good bodyman who is up on the latest finishes. They seem to come up with something new every few years.

But any paint company that makes paint that cannot be applied over old paint, is sure to go bankrupt.

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Originally Posted By: 58Mustang

If the original paint is sound, free of peeling, checking, etc., there is reason to sand it off. You will never be able to put on a better coat of primer, at home, than the 60 year old paint that you now have.

Ok, I'm confused.

Typo. I meant to say "There is NO reson to sand it off"

Does it poke you when you roll over in bed? Funny stuff

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Rusty, and Mustang, you both convinced me. I am nearly ready to paint my '55 Ford. It came BLACK, and someone put a cheap coat of black on top of that.

There is no lifting, but there are stone chips in a few small areas. I see some on the door skins. The guy I bought from, tried to buff the trunk, and a 6" diameter spot shows red primer. I guess he heated the black and it came off. 55RearArea.jpg Notice in the middle of the trunk lid, by the backlight. This Missouri photographer WETTED the car, first (I guess to make it shine). You can see dry spots on the verticals, but none of the driveway is wet. The seller sent this pic to "show" the car.

Should I sand any of the second coat off? There are no cracks in the paint. I have the car completely stripped. No chrome (or stainless), no glass, no nothing. Dash is out, too. I took the fenders and hood off and am changing engines (after I finish the body).

On bare metal, I use hydrochloric acid to disolve rust. How should I treat the bare metal from here? Do I wash the acid off with water and use a self-etch primer? When I do that I get a flash of surface rust right after washing and drying.

Eventually, I want to apply green body putty and block sand, then have my buddy paint in his booth.

I appreciate your good advice. I'm not a body man, but am learning very fast.

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Simply I don't know what to say. Doing a complete paint job takes some experience. I wouldn't suggest doing a neat old car like that for your first body job.

I've never used hydrochloric acid. My guess would be that you need to wash it off with water, dry the surface then prime and paint in the usual way.

Keep in mind that primer is porous and absorbs water. Primered areas should be sealed if the car is to be left unpainted for more than a few days especially if it is to be outside.

I suggest you have the car painted by a good body shop.

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