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48 Chrysler Imperial radiator


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I have a good friend in need of a radiator for his '48 Crown Imperial. He does not have the resources to have a new one made, so we are looking for a used one so we can get this fine car back on the road. I am told that all 8-cylinder Chrysler radiators are the same from '42 througb '48. Can anyone confirm that?

Thanks,

Jon Lee

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Not sure what the problem is here. Does he have an old worn out rad or is it totally gone?

If he has an old worn out rad he can have it recored no matter how bad it is.

All they do is save the mounting brackets and the top and bottom tanks and solder them onto a new rad core.

I haven't had one done in years but as a wild guess I would say, around $300 bucks.

This is the best and cheapest solution. The chance of buying a good used rad, that old, is "iffy" to say the least. And would probably cost as much or more if you count shipping.

Radiator cores are priced by the weight of metal and the size of the rad core. The fact that it is for a 1948 car doesn't make the slightest difference.

In other words, if it is the same size as a rad core for a 2005 pickup truck it will cost the same too.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks, Rusty, for the information. The radiator in the car has a rotten core, several repairs past fixing. I'm afraid your prices are a bit out of date, as you noted. One of the cost factors on this Chrysler radiator is the odd trapezoidal shape. I've gotten a couple of quotes on a building a new radiator, using the original brackets and tanks, as you suggest. These prices range from $7,000 to $8,500. That is why we have been trying, unsuccesfully, to find a usable original radiator. We could adapt a modern cross-flow into the car, but the owner really does not want to do such a bodge-up job. I'm afraid he will have to bite the bullet and either face the cost of the new radiator or sell the car as it is.

Thanks very much for your suggestions.

Jon Lee

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What do you mean odd trapezoidal shape? Do you mean the cells of the core?

You don't have to have an exact hand made duplicate of the 1948 design. They can put a modern core into your old tanks. Not one person in 100 will be able to tell the difference.

Do you know the dimensions of the core? I happen to have a 51 DeSoto in the driveway and its core is 21" wide by 19" high. I assume yours is about the same, perhaps a few inches taller?

I just phoned the local rad shop and they estimated $400 to $500 to recore my rad. But this is in Canada where everything costs 50% more than in the US.

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On the eight-cylinder cars, 1942 through 1948, the overall shape of the core is straight across on the top in the middle third, and slopes down on each end. Similarly, on the bottom, the center third is straight across and the outer portions slope upward. The shape of the opening at the bottom of the radiator support and the shape of the hood at the top don't allow for the rectangular shape of the radiator that is in your DeSoto. The core must be cut at an angle on all four corners. In addition, the eight-cylinder car uses a 5-core radiator, adding to the size and weight. Unfortunately this all adds to the cost. I'd love to get this done for the cost of a 3-core simple shape radiator core, but I don't see it happening.

Thanks for checking anyway.

Jon Lee

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  • 6 years later...
Thanks, Rusty, for the information. The radiator in the car has a rotten core, several repairs past fixing. I'm afraid your prices are a bit out of date, as you noted. One of the cost factors on this Chrysler radiator is the odd trapezoidal shape. I've gotten a couple of quotes on a building a new radiator, using the original brackets and tanks, as you suggest. These prices range from $7,000 to $8,500. That is why we have been trying, unsuccesfully, to find a usable original radiator. We could adapt a modern cross-flow into the car, but the owner really does not want to do such a bodge-up job. I'm afraid he will have to bite the bullet and either face the cost of the new radiator or sell the car as it is.

Thanks very much for your suggestions.

Jon Lee

One to many 0s? Never seen a rad that much.

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A very costly radiator no matter what you do to repair or replace it.... it's BIG, an odd shape and thick... and very hard to find one cheap!!!

I have read of one person here spent over $3000.00 to re-core one over on the east coast a few years ago.

I have four cars with that $$$ radiator. Lucky I have Two extra's as spares just in case.

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Edited by c49er (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...
I didn't know Plymouth made "Town and Country radiators".

Amazing what I learn here. Ought to be worth at least $5000.00 but...

I'd pay $75.00 + $25.00 shipping

Well there's a better offer. It may turn out to be the best.

I am well aware of the cost of things. I was just havin some fun.

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