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Need some help on valve adjustments


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1950-51 D42 230 ci 6 cylinder engine. Can someone refer me to a quick reference for the clearances for adjusting the valves. When it was assembled, I used '38 numbers to adjust them cold. Engines now been run long enough to be "brken in", and a different person may have adjusted the valves, but one is apparently set too lose and is 'clicking'. My recall is that they should be set with the engine 'hot'. Can someone help with tis? Thanks

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All Dodge six, 1941 to 1952 - Intake .008 exhaust .010. For continuous high speed service add .002 to the exhaust valve clearance. 1938 was .006 and .008

Valves should be set with the engine at normal operating temp with the engine running.

For access to the valves put the car up on a hoist, remove the right front wheel, remove the access plate in the inner fender, remove the valve cover plates on the side of the engine. Adjust all the intakes then adjust all the exhausts.

Info from Motor's auto repair manual 1954 edition.

If it was me I would check the valves with engine running note which valves need adjusting and how much, then shut off the engine and adjust them.

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Rusty, been there and done that, only I did it laying on a concrete floor. After getting hot oil up to the elbows and not even finishing one adjustment, I shut it off and then adjusted them while still hot, Drove it for 25,000 after that with out any appreciable valve noise.

Thanks for the help on the 50-51 info.

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What's with this adjusting valves hot and running? It is convenient on a slant 6 but a nightmare on a flathead. How important is it or what diff does it make? I have to assume Chrysler engineers had a good reason but what?

Ford flatheads had NO adjustment, the valves were adjusted by taking out the valves and grinding the ends! What's more you could only get at them with the intake manifold off.

Normally they were set at overhaul time and never touched again.

I'm willing to give Chrysler the benefit of the doubt because they were right about so many things. But I'm still puzzled.

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It was mentioned on this forum when Jon Robinson was active---he said to adjust them at 15 thou cold, both intake and exhaust. He said it was better to have them loose, less chance of them burning up if something was to get caught on the valve seat. George Asche mentioned to me that if I went with one of his mild regrind cams to adjust 12 and 10 thou cold------take your pick. I would rather run a bit loose myself.......Good Luck...52er

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Warm engine up-Hot, shut it off. Rotate rotor to each plug wire adjust both valves for that cylinder. Move on to the next cylinder. Clean and easy! .010 In/.012ex if your worried about burning valves.

Bob

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I set my '38 at the factory specs when I had the engine on an engine stand. Absolutely stone cold. Installed the engine and ran it 30,000+ miles before pulling it to replace it with a 230ci. (Gasp!) Pulled the head off on the 217ci out of curiosity to see if there had been any problems. From what little I do recall the valves looked as good as when I put them in. Did not look at the lifters/tappets or the cam. The timing chain was still tight. I used a go-no go feeler guage when I set the valves. So they could have been on the loose side.

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