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My 1940 Motors Factory Shop Manual lists 90 weight for Winter ad 160 weight for Summer for both tranny and rear axle for Chryslers going back to 1935. . I use 160 weight oil year round in my 1930 Desoto and 33 Chrysler and I don't drive them much in the Winter..

You could probably get by with modern 90W gear oil for all year so long as your outer axle seals are good and keep the oil from escaping at the brake drums. Do Not overfill or you will be very likely to have a mess in your rear brake linings which will be ruined by gear oil.

My 1930 owners manual states you should consult your Desoto dealer for the proper lubricant and does not specify the weight gear oil to use.

Marty Lum

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Martylum mentions that brake linings can be ruined by being soaked in gear oil. This is true. However, there is a way of salvaging most brake linings (and also clutch disc facings) soaked with any type of oil or brake fluid.

Please don't try this in an enclosed space, and don't breathe the fumes!

Use laquer thinner and soak the affected part(s) thoroughly.

When they are quite well soaked use an oxy-acetylene torch to heat the part, but don't get it too hot. The oil, diluted by the thinner, will boil off and burn. If the shoe is really badly soaked, and has been for a long time, you may have to repeat the process one or two additional times.

If you have not thoroughly removed the oil from the lining, the worst that will happen is that oil will retun to the surface when the brakes have been applied hard and long enough to heat them up - probably to a temperature greater that you got them to in the fist place. If this happens, remove the shoe and repeat the soak and heat process. Over the years, I have found this a virtually sure-fire way to restore oil-soaked friction surfaces.

Brian

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Tks Mikzjr,Penrite cant tell me ,nor can their webpage. Meanwhile my car is up on a hoist! I am guessing it is 90 sae but the transmission is not liking it.. My Kingdom for an owners manual which I have been un able to track down!,thanks for replying.

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600 weight gear oil was used from the earliest days of motoring up into the 20s when transmission seals weren't very effective.I had a 24 dodge in for service and the owners manual recommended 600 weight oil. That car's transmissing had very poor sealing at the output end and probably needed a very heavy oil to keep much in the tranny for very long.

On my 1930 and 33 I use 140 weight and have minimal leakage due to new seals when I rebuilt these trannies. The 140 weight seems to work nicely with a 1933 synchromesh transmission.

Marty lum

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Penrite's website is not reliable. I checked it last year and it recommended 90 gear oil for the trans in my 51 DeSoto. All DeSoto and Chrysler cars that year used #10 motor oil in fact, from 1939 to 1953 the semi autos in Dodge DeSoto and Chrysler cars used #10.

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