Jump to content

Undercoating in 1920?


Recommended Posts

(My last post on this subject didn't work, so I repeat)

When was undercoating first used? It's on the interior of my 1921 car's metal panels, and I wonder if it was a 1950s addition.

Phil Jamison

PA

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I recall Ziebart came on the scene in the 1959 or thereabout in Detroit.

I can't recall ever hearing about undercoating of that tar like stuff prior to that but I'm just a 60 year old youngster. My 47 Packard has some type of tar like panels on the floor and interior of doors but it is not for rustproofing but, I suspect, sound deadener.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the idea on my car was for squeak reduction and (maybe) sound deadening. I've never seen inside one of these old cars except for mine, so I wanted to see if it;s correct.

Phil Jamison

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a 1938 NASH quite a few years ago that listed 50 pounds of a tar / sand mixture that was sprayed on the underbody to deaden sound in the origional sales literature ...

A very heavy coating was still on most of the underbody 50 years later ...

Link to post
Share on other sites

They also glued hunks of thick tar paper inside the doors and possibly other places. Have seen this on 40s cars, don't know when they started this.

My guess would be they had to spray some tar on flat panels to stop drumming and noise due to vibration. Certainly on the first all steel closed bodies but possibly even before that. A wood frame body would be quieter than an all steel body but I see the Franklin is wood framed and has the sound deadener in it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...