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tbirdman

coolant flow

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Since I failed to flush out the engine before I started my winter project, I want to put a filter in the raditor hoses to catch any engine crap. I had the radiator serviced and I want it to stay clean. I was thinking of using an old nylon stocking foot, and put it on the upper hose as a filter. Any problem with doing this?

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Just curious why you can't flush now. Old cars are dead easy to get at the lower hose and stick a water hose in the radiator as they run puking out all the gunk. A 15 minute no sweat deal.

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The radiator has been flushed. My concerned is anything coming from the engine when I strat it and clogging the recently serviced radiator.

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The best solution would be a filter with a sediment-bowl for the particals to drop down into, that could be left on for a longer time without cloging. Similar to a fuel-filter with sediment-bowl.

I don't remember seeing one that large, so it would probably need to be fabricated.

Hey, I think I've just invented something. grin.gif

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I happen to agree with twitch here. I use the following procedure to flush the engine; the engine only, as the 'dirty' coolant never gets back to the radiator.

1) Disconnect the top radiator hose from the radiator.

2) Attach some pool hose to the top radiator hose (or outlet from the engine and run this out to a suitable drain area

3) Put a fill hose in the radiator

4) turn on fill hose

5) Start engine, let run until clear water is flowing from the engine outlet.

Just make sure the fill hose is running fast enough to keep the radiator full.

This works well on my 34. It is a bit more of a pain on the 30 because things are a bit more cramped at the front of the engine.

Tom

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Sometimes you can find at flea markets for a few bucks the gadget many repair shops used to flush the block (or radiator), and in this case I'd flush the block backwards. Remove the hoses and the thermostat. The gadget has two inlet connections on it, garden hose for water and an air chuck for compressed air. The business end that goes into the lower hose to the block is a series of tapered steps to accomodate a variety of hose sizes. This method with some compressed air burbling with the water is quite a bit more effective than just using pressurized city water. Another way you might try is the same, flushing in from the bottom block hose, but block off the thermostat outlet and open one or two year core plugs. The flushings doing this often look like run-off from the Mesabi Range. Very effective.

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BTW, how does one remove the temperature sensor from the back of the cylinder head; on the drivers side very near the end of the head? I unscrewed the retaining cap, but just pulling doesn't seem to remove the sensor (though I am not pulling hard, as I don't want to break anything). Nothing in any manual is currently helpful.

Thanks,

Tom

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 34PackardRoadsta</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> how does one remove the temperature sensor from the back of the cylinder head;</div></div>

It should slip out, but they always get a buildup of rust and corrosion on the inside. I've freed some of them by spraying in PB-blaster repeatedly but some never loosen and have to be drilled out. mad.gif Spray in the PB-blaster, put the nut back in and let it set over night. Try to get needle-nose plyers on the bulb end and work it out. Without damaging the tube, is sometimes very difficult.

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Can I just cut the sensor lead and resolder it when I get it back together? That way I can work on getting it out when the head is off the car. Or maybe I can disconnect the lead from the temp gauge on the dash?

Thanks,

Tom

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NO, can NOT cut or disconnect it.

It's actually a small tube that's filled with gas, not a wire.

If it breaks, it will need to be sent somewhere for repair, which requires special equipment, or replaced as a complete assembly, gauge and all.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Packin31</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I am just going to stick a turkey thermometer in mine smile.gif </div></div>

I didn't know turkey's could tell temperature. So, where will you put the turkey confused.gif ? Seems like the engine space would a little small.

In all seriousness, Rick thanks for that info. I won't mess with the lead. I just spent some more time trying to get the sensor out, and I think it is going to take a while. More PB and another soak.

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Rick,

Mine has been broken off for some time now. I always wonder why it didn't work until you posted on another thread about a year or so ago on how they work.

I think Ken may have brought it up too in the past.

Was just kidding about the turkey one but was wondering if one can just buy a screw in a type for now then have the other one fixed?

Look what I came across

http://www.ply33.com/Repair/tempgauge

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Great web-link Tom.

I may try to repair a couple I have someday.

The thing I'm wondering about is that article says that Ether alone is used, and I've heard somewhere that is a combination of Ether and some other chemical ??? But can't remember what it was?

Or am I thinking about radiator-thermostats only ???

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It's in liquid form, so it's just injected into the bulb, with a small needled syrenge. It would be best to pull a vacuum first to pull out as many impurities as you can, that may contaminate it. The vacuum could be pulled thru a small tube soldered over a small hole in the repair solder joint. Then Ether is injected into rubber tubing above the vacuum port. The vacuum line is crimped and soldered closed.

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In the artical, instead of pulling a vacuum they keep the Ether very cold so it will expand only slightly, pushing out most of the air, but Not expanding enough to push out the Ether, which would make it impossible to solder/seal the final hole. Once it starts heating and expanding it would be impossible to solder it closed due to internal pressure.

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Tom,

If you read the thread on mine thta Speedster posted, I was afraid of breaking it, but just gave it enough pull with a needle nose that it popped out. Though I had to get mine fixed (No big deal as I was restoring the guage anyway)because I had unsolder the end at the gauge not realizing the results of my actions.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Owen_Dyneto</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sometimes you can find at flea markets for a few bucks the gadget many repair shops used to flush the block (or radiator), and in this case I'd flush the block backwards. Remove the hoses and the thermostat. The gadget has two inlet connections on it, garden hose for water and an air chuck for compressed air. The business end that goes into the lower hose to the block is a series of tapered steps to accomodate a variety of hose sizes. This method with some compressed air burbling with the water is quite a bit more effective than just using pressurized city water. Another way you might try is the same, flushing in from the bottom block hose, but block off the thermostat outlet and open one or two year core plugs. The flushings doing this often look like run-off from the Mesabi Range. Very effective. </div></div>

No thermostat in my car. I plan to run some 3' long rubber 1/2" diameter hoses to the engine inlet and outlet. I then will attached with hose clamps 10' long 1" PVC pipe to the hoses so I can run water into the bottom outlet and easily funnel the water coming from the top outlet. I am to keep any mess away from the car.

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