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bkazmer

corvair vs valiant

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I'd like some opinions (with all good natured bias included) on comparing these two as driver level acquisitions (convt or 2-dr hardtop). I guess "option C" opinions are welcome too (but not yet another overpriced Mustang). I know we are rarely short of opinions around here, so let the fun begin

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I'd like some opinions (with all good natured bias included) on comparing these two as driver level acquisitions (convt or 2-dr hardtop). I guess "option C" opinions are welcome too (but not yet another overpriced Mustang). I know we are rarely short of opinions around here, so let the fun begin

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I am strictly a Mopar guy, although the Monza Spyder conv. could have floated my boat a long time ago. Regardless of brand bias which I admit I have, I feel that the Valiant/Dart line would be a better buy all the way around. I think parts are much more readily available. I have 3 Dodge Dart convertibles and a dart 4 dr sedan 3 with slant sixes and one with a mildly warmed over 273 V-8. I see a lot of the 2 types of Mopar vehicles around but few of the corvairs. Of the corvairs I do see they fall into 2 basic categories, parts cars/trash or pristine show car. There seems to be little in between. Please keep in mind that this is strictly my opinion, others may differ, and this is based on what I see in my area. Other parts of the country may be different. Also look at the ads in Hemmings and see how many there are for each vehicle and the prices.

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I am strictly a Mopar guy, although the Monza Spyder conv. could have floated my boat a long time ago. Regardless of brand bias which I admit I have, I feel that the Valiant/Dart line would be a better buy all the way around. I think parts are much more readily available. I have 3 Dodge Dart convertibles and a dart 4 dr sedan 3 with slant sixes and one with a mildly warmed over 273 V-8. I see a lot of the 2 types of Mopar vehicles around but few of the corvairs. Of the corvairs I do see they fall into 2 basic categories, parts cars/trash or pristine show car. There seems to be little in between. Please keep in mind that this is strictly my opinion, others may differ, and this is based on what I see in my area. Other parts of the country may be different. Also look at the ads in Hemmings and see how many there are for each vehicle and the prices.

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I have to agree , the Valiant would be easier to get repair parts for. I also believe that the Dart/Valiant cars, when new, were more dependable than a Corvair ever thought of being. I'm a little biased, but I think the Mopars are your better bet.

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I have to agree , the Valiant would be easier to get repair parts for. I also believe that the Dart/Valiant cars, when new, were more dependable than a Corvair ever thought of being. I'm a little biased, but I think the Mopars are your better bet.

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Monzas were without a doubt far superior to the Valiant in every sense- looks, handling, power, response, uniqueness. Remember Corvairs Monzas were "sporty" cars that had no translated counterpart in the Valiant econo car line up.

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Monzas were without a doubt far superior to the Valiant in every sense- looks, handling, power, response, uniqueness. Remember Corvairs Monzas were "sporty" cars that had no translated counterpart in the Valiant econo car line up.

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I have had both , the Corvair was a convertible and yes the other was just a Valiant so one felt like a sport car and the other just a cheep four door with a six auto so for me it would have been the Corvair and even the cheaper Corvair models gave you a good feeling when driving . Mike

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I have had both , the Corvair was a convertible and yes the other was just a Valiant so one felt like a sport car and the other just a cheep four door with a six auto so for me it would have been the Corvair and even the cheaper Corvair models gave you a good feeling when driving . Mike

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Dear Twitch,YOU sir have just said it ALL.IMHO the apples to apples comparison would be the Chevy II to the Valiant.diz

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Dear Twitch,YOU sir have just said it ALL.IMHO the apples to apples comparison would be the Chevy II to the Valiant.diz

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I owned both in the past. The 69 Valiant was very reliable but left me stranded in a South Bronx neighborhood one day. The 64 Corvair had some problems but never left me stranded anywhere. The Valiant ( 2 dr Sedan) looked and handled like an economy vehicle ( no hard turns, not much luxury) The Corvair handled like a semi sports car and looked great with the top up or down.

The Valiant worked off a more than proven engine ( the slant six with a 3 speed stick). The Corvair was in year 4 of the rear engine technology with a 4 speed stick. There was some odd things about the Corvair which today are mostly straightened out in the after car parts market ( things like the 2 piece flywheel which cost me several starter end caps before I learned about it.) The valiant had a great heater. The Corvair ought to have come with a warning about frozen feet in the winter.

Both cars were fun.

I let the Valiant go as it started to rust uncontrolably. I gave the Corvair to my brother when I left home with no place to keep it. The Corvair had some rust issues but was still basically solid. I imagine the valiant is still running today but unable to be driven due to serious rust issues. Meanwhile the Corvair is still running today and I just had a chance to drive it this past Easter sunday. Although it is substantially modified now, ( 4 bbl carb, quick turn steering and short throw shifter), it occurred to me that it's noisy and not as pleasurable as my Buicks. Then again it has been a work in progress for my brother and nephew, after it sat for close to 15 years.

The one thing I would recommend in either car is don't get one with an automatic tranny. Neither will be blistering fast, but the Stick Shift makes them unique and much more fun to drive.

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I owned both in the past. The 69 Valiant was very reliable but left me stranded in a South Bronx neighborhood one day. The 64 Corvair had some problems but never left me stranded anywhere. The Valiant ( 2 dr Sedan) looked and handled like an economy vehicle ( no hard turns, not much luxury) The Corvair handled like a semi sports car and looked great with the top up or down.

The Valiant worked off a more than proven engine ( the slant six with a 3 speed stick). The Corvair was in year 4 of the rear engine technology with a 4 speed stick. There was some odd things about the Corvair which today are mostly straightened out in the after car parts market ( things like the 2 piece flywheel which cost me several starter end caps before I learned about it.) The valiant had a great heater. The Corvair ought to have come with a warning about frozen feet in the winter.

Both cars were fun.

I let the Valiant go as it started to rust uncontrolably. I gave the Corvair to my brother when I left home with no place to keep it. The Corvair had some rust issues but was still basically solid. I imagine the valiant is still running today but unable to be driven due to serious rust issues. Meanwhile the Corvair is still running today and I just had a chance to drive it this past Easter sunday. Although it is substantially modified now, ( 4 bbl carb, quick turn steering and short throw shifter), it occurred to me that it's noisy and not as pleasurable as my Buicks. Then again it has been a work in progress for my brother and nephew, after it sat for close to 15 years.

The one thing I would recommend in either car is don't get one with an automatic tranny. Neither will be blistering fast, but the Stick Shift makes them unique and much more fun to drive.

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Since you are willing to listen to an Option "C", how about a Studebaker Lark?

I am a little prejudiced, since I have driven Larks most of my life. They have some good points for a driver.

Parts are available and relatively inexpensive, especially mechanical parts and there is a large club support. The 259 cu.in. V8 is the best bet, since it has good performance and gets better gas mileage, on the road, than the flathead six.

We have a joint meet with the Corvair Club every fall, and they have a good club support also. I see very few Valiants. The only one I have seen was at the Chrysler Meet in VA Beach last summer.

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Since you are willing to listen to an Option "C", how about a Studebaker Lark?

I am a little prejudiced, since I have driven Larks most of my life. They have some good points for a driver.

Parts are available and relatively inexpensive, especially mechanical parts and there is a large club support. The 259 cu.in. V8 is the best bet, since it has good performance and gets better gas mileage, on the road, than the flathead six.

We have a joint meet with the Corvair Club every fall, and they have a good club support also. I see very few Valiants. The only one I have seen was at the Chrysler Meet in VA Beach last summer.

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The Lark fits Option C, and I have a weak spot for independents. Limited body style availability, isn't there?

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The Lark fits Option C, and I have a weak spot for independents. Limited body style availability, isn't there?

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In 1959 the Lark had a 4 door sedan, 2 door wagon, 2 door hardtop and a 2 door sedan. In 1960 they added a convertible and a 4 door wagon.

The convertibles are the only body style that usually brings over 5 figures. 4 door sedans show up on eBay all the time and go for reasonable prices.

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In 1959 the Lark had a 4 door sedan, 2 door wagon, 2 door hardtop and a 2 door sedan. In 1960 they added a convertible and a 4 door wagon.

The convertibles are the only body style that usually brings over 5 figures. 4 door sedans show up on eBay all the time and go for reasonable prices.

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Well, if your going to go with the Corvair, get one of the later model ones, not one of the ones from the first couple of years production. You can tell the difference when the body style was changed. I had a 1960 Corvair which tried to kill me in more ways then I can count.

On an option C idea, have you considered an early 60s Jeep?

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Well, if your going to go with the Corvair, get one of the later model ones, not one of the ones from the first couple of years production. You can tell the difference when the body style was changed. I had a 1960 Corvair which tried to kill me in more ways then I can count.

On an option C idea, have you considered an early 60s Jeep?

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In the mid 60s I bought a used Corvair, later switched to Valiants and Darts so I know both cars well.

The Valiant is a better everyday car but the Corvair was more fun. For summer used today as a hobby car the Corvair would be my choice.

If you are not interested in being your own mechanic, and relearning how to fix cars, get the Valiant. They are a much more reliable,and standardised car.

Have not had the pleasure of owning a Lark but would definitely consider one. They were the only one of the original batch of compacts to offer a V8. Though the others did come up with V8 models later, Valiant being the last (1964). Corvair never did get any other motor but the flat 6.

Then there is the car that started the whole compact trend, Rambler.

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