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cardinal905

CAR VALUES

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One way to determine the value of a specialty car is to have it appraised. To merely get the range of possible prices wheter buying or selling, the various online sites and personal recomendations can get you "in the ballpark". If you are considering a specific vehicle or want to insure your present collector car for actual replacement value an appraisal will certianly help.

I am currently building a practice providing professional valuations for all types of collector in the Central CA. Coast area.

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Cardinal, Chacheska's advice is probably the best. If you're interested in Packards, join the Packard Club and, if one exists, a local Packard chapter. People in these clubs are more than friendly and ready to give good advice. In fact, you will occasionally run into the problem I sometinmes have where its tough to get off the phone! Also, many times cars are advertised through these organizations and between those advertisements and asking questions of club members you should be OK. Thats the way I did it and my 26 Packard is a lot of fun to drive.

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Cardinal, Chacheska's advice is probably the best. If you're interested in Packards, join the Packard Club and, if one exists, a local Packard chapter. People in these clubs are more than friendly and ready to give good advice. In fact, you will occasionally run into the problem I sometinmes have where its tough to get off the phone! Also, many times cars are advertised through these organizations and between those advertisements and asking questions of club members you should be OK. Thats the way I did it and my 26 Packard is a lot of fun to drive.

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Yes, I printed off the Packard form just now. This forum is great that way---just scroll down for the next step in an adventure !! Appraisals are great, but on a 8-15k car its not feasable.

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Yes, I printed off the Packard form just now. This forum is great that way---just scroll down for the next step in an adventure !! Appraisals are great, but on a 8-15k car its not feasable.

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Old Cars Price Guide says I can buy a 1932 Packard 902 Conv in #5 condition for $13200. Anyone have one they are willing to sell for that price? How about a Conv Victoria for $15360? I'll take 2 of those. How about a '33 Caddy V16 Dual Cowl Phaeton for $30480? I'd borrow money to buy that one. Maybe you would prefer the '55 Jaguar Conv for $7560? For those with a smaller budget why not the '31 Model A Roadster for $3240? These price guides are pretty much all the same. They start with a few real prices from auctions etc. and extrapolate the rest. Very little relationship to what cars actually sell for, especially on the lower end of the condition scale.

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Old Cars Price Guide says I can buy a 1932 Packard 902 Conv in #5 condition for $13200. Anyone have one they are willing to sell for that price? How about a Conv Victoria for $15360? I'll take 2 of those. How about a '33 Caddy V16 Dual Cowl Phaeton for $30480? I'd borrow money to buy that one. Maybe you would prefer the '55 Jaguar Conv for $7560? For those with a smaller budget why not the '31 Model A Roadster for $3240? These price guides are pretty much all the same. They start with a few real prices from auctions etc. and extrapolate the rest. Very little relationship to what cars actually sell for, especially on the lower end of the condition scale.

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Certainly no one is going to find a Duesey in a garage for $1,000 but there are tens of thousands of reasobnably priced vintage cars. I mean under $15,000 and often under $10,000. Everybody doesn't desire a Pierce Arrow or Stutz. Even if they were free the upkeep, insurance and hesitation for many to drive them would outweigh any fun factor.

There are Nashes, Hudsons, Studebakers, Buicks, Oldsmobiles, postwar Packards, Dodges and Plymouths from the late 30s-50s if you want something different the the ubiquitous Ford or Chevy.

In the 60s there are even more selections only at generally lower prices if you don't dream of muscle cars. 60s Camaros and Mustangs can be found that under $15,000. The may be "averge" condition but they'll give a lot of enjoyment for the dollar.

From 1958-1969 Fords and Chevies are valued less than 10 grand if you stay away from convertibles and 2-door hardtops. Some are well under 10 Gs. Same goes for Dodges,Pymouths and even Chryslers. Many, models of Olds, Pontiacs, and Buicks are down there. AMCs are at near givaway prices across the board if you want something different.

And most of these cars will be about as rare as seeing a Duesenberg at your local crusie in or show at the park. Most of the big boats don't fit in the category of "sought after" so a 66 Olds 98 can lord over the zillion Fords and Chevies that are.

I encourage people that attend these functions to start looking and become educated if they express any curious desire of owning a vintage vehicle. I've found lot of guys at retirement age that definitely are goin to need something to do besdies listen to the wife till they die. They have a few bucks and most say "I always wanted one."

They may need to recalibrate from 32 LaSalle to a 65 Thunderbird HT but they'll have a car at least.

And a lot of these cars can and should be purchased from local sources and even Ebay in certain instances instead of from "collector" publications and sites who will have the prices jacked up. Believe me there are tons of people who know nothing of NADA Gold Book or any other evaluation source for aged autos.

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Certainly no one is going to find a Duesey in a garage for $1,000 but there are tens of thousands of reasobnably priced vintage cars. I mean under $15,000 and often under $10,000. Everybody doesn't desire a Pierce Arrow or Stutz. Even if they were free the upkeep, insurance and hesitation for many to drive them would outweigh any fun factor.

There are Nashes, Hudsons, Studebakers, Buicks, Oldsmobiles, postwar Packards, Dodges and Plymouths from the late 30s-50s if you want something different the the ubiquitous Ford or Chevy.

In the 60s there are even more selections only at generally lower prices if you don't dream of muscle cars. 60s Camaros and Mustangs can be found that under $15,000. The may be "averge" condition but they'll give a lot of enjoyment for the dollar.

From 1958-1969 Fords and Chevies are valued less than 10 grand if you stay away from convertibles and 2-door hardtops. Some are well under 10 Gs. Same goes for Dodges,Pymouths and even Chryslers. Many, models of Olds, Pontiacs, and Buicks are down there. AMCs are at near givaway prices across the board if you want something different.

And most of these cars will be about as rare as seeing a Duesenberg at your local crusie in or show at the park. Most of the big boats don't fit in the category of "sought after" so a 66 Olds 98 can lord over the zillion Fords and Chevies that are.

I encourage people that attend these functions to start looking and become educated if they express any curious desire of owning a vintage vehicle. I've found lot of guys at retirement age that definitely are goin to need something to do besdies listen to the wife till they die. They have a few bucks and most say "I always wanted one."

They may need to recalibrate from 32 LaSalle to a 65 Thunderbird HT but they'll have a car at least.

And a lot of these cars can and should be purchased from local sources and even Ebay in certain instances instead of from "collector" publications and sites who will have the prices jacked up. Believe me there are tons of people who know nothing of NADA Gold Book or any other evaluation source for aged autos.

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And I just signed up for a year, that has been my experience in the short time I have been in this hobby. I supose you need to arrive at your own price after looking---kinda hard when you have not nailed a make and model down.

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And I just signed up for a year, that has been my experience in the short time I have been in this hobby. I supose you need to arrive at your own price after looking---kinda hard when you have not nailed a make and model down.

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You can probably get a nice late 40s -1950 "Pregnant Elephant" (aka bathtub) for that. Or the Packards made after that even. The 51-54 still had the straight 8 which wasn't called the million mile engine for nothing. Anyway, good luck! I'm sure that by doing your homework, like for example visiting these boards and joining a few clubs you will do just fine.

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You can probably get a nice late 40s -1950 "Pregnant Elephant" (aka bathtub) for that. Or the Packards made after that even. The 51-54 still had the straight 8 which wasn't called the million mile engine for nothing. Anyway, good luck! I'm sure that by doing your homework, like for example visiting these boards and joining a few clubs you will do just fine.

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Old Cars Price Guide can be erratic depending on the marque but I can tell you this........ it was right on the money when it came to the prices I paid for the last two classics I bought, my Packard and Pierce Arrow. It was a little low on my Buick but for the most part it's been pretty close for the cars I've purchased. I'm using it as a source to negotiate a deal right now with the seller of another classic I'm interested in and he's going along with it. It's important to realize it's a GUIDE to be used as a rule of thumb. Cardinal, I don't think you'll be able to find values for the Price Guide on the internet. They wouldn't be able to publish and make money on their monthly magazine if they provided the info on the net. I go to the local public library for the latest edition. Our library keeps the last two years on file. I'm not familiar with the Mannheim Gold Book. I'll have to look into that one.

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Old Cars Price Guide can be erratic depending on the marque but I can tell you this........ it was right on the money when it came to the prices I paid for the last two classics I bought, my Packard and Pierce Arrow. It was a little low on my Buick but for the most part it's been pretty close for the cars I've purchased. I'm using it as a source to negotiate a deal right now with the seller of another classic I'm interested in and he's going along with it. It's important to realize it's a GUIDE to be used as a rule of thumb. Cardinal, I don't think you'll be able to find values for the Price Guide on the internet. They wouldn't be able to publish and make money on their monthly magazine if they provided the info on the net. I go to the local public library for the latest edition. Our library keeps the last two years on file. I'm not familiar with the Mannheim Gold Book. I'll have to look into that one.

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