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finger repair


Bhigdog
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If your fingers are like mine they often get little dings or cuts or the tips crack in the winter. A great fix is super glue. I just put a drop of glue on the area (when it's dry) and then put a tiny piece of paper towel in the wet drop of glue. In a couple of minute it's dry and the the crack/cut is good for a couple of days. It's instant relief. Reapply as often as needed.....Bob

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The best use, Wayne, is to protect the minor injury or chap crack after it has dried to the point of not bleeding. The glue is more to patch over the injury so you don't keep reopening it and getting more dirt in it. For example I got a small slice on one of my finger tips yesterday. After washing and drying, the bleeding had stopped and I used the glue patch. I was able to work the rest of the day and all day today without any discomfort or dirt in the cut. Again this is for very minor cuts or the chap cracks that many people get in the winter. BTW, if you are concerned about sterility there are sterile medical versions of super glue that are approved for closing wounds.......bob

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: dongle</div><div class="ubbcode-body">...and WD-40 for your arthritis. </div></div>

Also works well on a snow shovel to keep snow from sticking to it. Cooking spray also works...

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The hazards of using superglue is it gets absorbed into the blood stream. Once in there it remains in liquid form and will eventually settle and build up in "lower extremities" for which there is no readily available return blood flow. In otherwords, you may seem fine now, but six or seven years from now..."call your doctor immediately if you experience...."

(LOL)

Actually, the best cure - clean the wound, stick the finger in a glass of single malt scotch, stir, lick finger, drink scotch.

Terry

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Bob, you are right. I occasionally do use Superglue when I am tired of continually reopening a small wound.

Terry, I think I get the joke but I can't go into any more detail in writing...but most guys would not have a problem with that side effect would they? grin.gifcrazy.gifgrin.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: R W Burgess</div><div class="ubbcode-body">How about if it is a bleeder, Bob?

Wayne </div></div>

I've been using electrical tape for years to stop the bleeders. My wife used to tell friends about my doctoring methods (semi making fun of me) until she cut herself last year. We were in the middle of nowhere with the car trailer and she asked what cabinet the electrical tape was in.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Ron Green</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I've been using electrical tape for years to stop the bleeders. My wife used to tell friends about my doctoring methods (semi making fun of me) until she cut herself last year. We were in the middle of nowhere with the car trailer and she asked what cabinet the electrical tape was in. </div></div>

Yep, good old carpenter's band-aid. Find scrap of cloth/paper. Wrap tightly with tape or string. Get back to work.

I inevitably give myself scary deep cuts whenever I use a razor knife. Now I simply slice my finger open before I start just to get it out of the way early... laugh.gif

Liquid skin or Nu-Skin is great stuff. It has antiseptic in it already and seals up tight. I usually apply it in layers and it is as tough as my calloused skin. I did hear once, however, that it was simply thinned Super Glue. Don't know if that's true.

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Super glue was originally invented to be used as a tissue adhesive so doctors wouldn't have to use stitches or bandages and could quickly seal a cut. You may have noticed that super glue will adhere to your skin better than it does to the two parts you're trying to glue together.

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Actually, Johnson and Johnson makes a super glue base wound closer/BandAid brand bandage product. Has a germ killer in it too. Comes in small tubes with an applicator. Works pretty well, stays put usually until wound heals. Look for it in first aid section of stores. I've used it - good on kids cuts too as it keeps wound closed better than standard bandage.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Matt Harwood</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

I inevitably give myself scary deep cuts whenever I use a razor knife. Now I simply slice my finger open before I start just to get it out of the way early... laugh.gif </div></div>

Sort of like a electrician I knew. When installing lamps days on end for one of our bigger projects he would break 2 the first thing in the morning to get it out of the way.

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For years I have always carried a small supply of band aids in my wallet - always there and take up almost no space.

One time I was in a store and a little boy had somehow cut his finger and was crying his eyes out. His father was with him and didn't know what to do. I asked the father if he could use a band aid and pulled one out of my wallet. The father opened the band aid and put it on his son's finger, stopping the bleeding and the little boy stopped crying immediately and smiled. The father also smiled (at me) and thanked me.

I have convinced others of this idea, solving such problems quickly. Any of us working on cars should keep this in mind, unless you are luckier than I am.

Fred

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">'course, you could always wear gloves. OK, I'll go away now.

</div></div>

REAL men don't wear gloves........ wink.gif

Actually I do wear gloves when doing glove type work including nitrile or vinyl when using solvents or paint. Along with hearing protection safety glasses etc. But for some jobs you really need bare hands and as they say "s**t happens".........Bob

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: MR_TIP</div><div class="ubbcode-body">For years I have always carried a small supply of band aids in my wallet - always there and take up almost no space. </div></div>

I also carry at least one for quick first-aid.

We also carry the tattoo kind in the RV that are waterproof and the edges seal all the way around to keep them dry. They came in handy down at the beach. A little girl had skinned her knee and screamed every time her mom got near her with a regular band-aid. I walked out with the box of the waterproof tattoo <span style="font-weight: bold"><span style="font-style: italic">101 Dalmatian</span></span> band-aids and let her pick one. No problem putting that one on. grin.gif

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Mr. TIP, Glad to see that I am not the only one who does that. I always carry two or three band aids in my business card case. I never go anywhere without them. I have been doing this since my early boy scout days. I very seldom need them, but it sure impresses others when they need one and I am prepared.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bugman</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Super glue was originally invented to be used as a tissue adhesive so doctors wouldn't have to use stitches or bandages and could quickly seal a cut. You may have noticed that super glue will adhere to your skin better than it does to the two parts you're trying to glue together. </div></div>

It wasn't invented as a tissue adhesive, but this was it's first use outside of the lab. It debuted in Korea in the aid stations closest to battle, before being medivaced to a MASH.

Gluing flesh works because super glue cures quickly in the presence of protein (your finger), and moisture (your blood).

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Mindful of the warnings of essential precauctions when you use two-pack paints with volatile isocyanates, I checked with my most accessible expert chemist, my former boss at CSIRO. I was worried such use may have been close to Darwin Award effort. However it does polymerise very quickly through skin moisture; and as others have said, super glue has been useful surgically. I can assure you that it is excellent for home repair of broken dentures, but I left the repair in water overnight so there was no bad taste.

I have suffered a lot of unroadworthy fingers in the workshop, and my first action is to compress the damage with other fingers for ten or fifteen minutes. This apparently constricts the blood vessels so it does not leak as much when you dress it. The old bushmen used to say you should get a puppy to lick the injury. We have never had Rabies in Australia. And aside from that, the oral bacteria from the bite of a human will give more health problems than the bite of a dog. Several months ago I was given a good cattle dog Kelpie puppy, of a litter that had been raised in a sheep shed pen where they learned that to get attention from the "big dogs", they had to be vertical too. She used to lacerate the calves of my legs as I worked at the lathe,(in our climate I wear shorts all year round);and then she would lovingly lick it all better. It certainly sealed and healed quickly. Only trouble I have now is that I have to tie her up when she wants to save me from harm when I use grinder or oxy torch. Did not bother her to suffer shortened, curled, and smelly whiskers.

Ivan Saxton

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Folks a way out in the hills- not the suburbanites that moved further out- swear by urinating on hands beat up by hard work. I'm not joking. I heard this in Arkansas.

Hey look at it this way, it's free. If it don't work buy your fancy schmancy creams.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Twitch</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Folks a way out in the hills- not the suburbanites that moved further out- swear by urinating on hands beat up by hard work. I'm not joking. I heard this in Arkansas.

Hey look at it this way, it's free. If it don't work buy your fancy schmancy creams. </div></div>

So how do they eat food with their hands? Yuck.

Have you guys seen that show "Dirty Jobs"? If I were that guy, I'd eat all my food with gloves on from now on. Eeeeew.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">hands beat up by hard work</div></div>

The best thing i've found for poor chapped, cracked, beat up hands is before going to bed slather them good with vaseline and sleep wearing a pair of thin cotton gloves. You won't believe how good your hands will feel and look after only one night.........Bob

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Urine for sure will take the sting out of a jellyfish sting. That is why lifeguards at the beach keep bottles of ammonia in their stash of first-aid supplies. Not sure about using urine on cuts. But they say is it sterile while it is in the body.

As for what people from Arkansas do...... wink.gifblush.gifgrin.gif

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The main reason for a lot of dry and cracked hands, and industrial dematitis, is use of cleaning agents that de-fat the skin, i.e. remove the natural proective oils. Once you do this the skin is much harder to keep clean, quite apart from anything else. Skin is naturally just the acid side of neutral ph, and most handcleaners are notably alkaline. Prolonged use of these pre-disposes the skin to soiling, and exacerbates the need for handcleaner. I had problems for years, until a dermatologist put me onto one handcleaner with the same ph as skin. I use it when I need to; and the rest of the time I use mild soap and cold water.

If you need to replenish the skin oil, one of the closest substitutes you can get is wool fat, or lanolin. (This has also come to be marketed for rust protection of unpainted steel). We have always had a very significant wool industry, and the hands of shearers and wool sorters are always clean, soft, and white.

As for natural anti-bacterial protection, you are better blessed than we are. Your American Black Walnut tree vigorously gathers iodine from the soil. It is iodine that produces the dark colour of the timber. Our soils where I live here in Gippsland region of Victoria is notoriously deficient in iodine, yet the leaves of a black walnut tree about five miles from here just reek of it. Steve came here from NJ 30-odd years ago when there was a shortage of teachers, and he lives in about five acres of Permaculture of many of the most useful plants you can imagine. If you plant a black walnut in your garden, in time you will be able to crush leaves or the soft coating around the nuts as antiseptic dressing for cuts. Iodine is pretty useful stuff. It prevents Goitre (a disfiguring deficiency), being an essential component of thyroxin, which has various endorcrine functions, - notably enhancemen of basal metabolic rate so you might restore your cars more quickly.

Ivan Saxton

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">in time you will be able to crush leaves or the soft coating around the nuts as antiseptic dressing </div></div>

And the nuts are delicious baked in goodies.....Bob

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Just don't have the trees or leaves anywhere near horses. They put a toxin into the horse's system that attacks their hooves and the inner support system of the bones inside the hooves. The toxin can even leech out of the ground after a tree or leaf pile has been removed and cause a condition called founder in horses. If the founder is severe enough or not caught in time the horse will have to be put down. It is a terrible thing to have happen.

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Roger that. We have one tree well away from the horses. We bed with saw dust and are carefull that there is no walnut dust in it, which is also supposed to be toxic to horses.

BTW, the best way to get the husks off of black walnuts is to put them in the driveway for awhile.......Bob

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