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Does Anyone Remember The Milk, Post, Ice, Ice Cream Delivery....


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....Person in your neighborhood???

I circulated this around some of the other forums to find out what it was.

Turns out that it is a 1916 or 17 Studebaker 4 cylinder Commercial Car. A panel delivery Model.

elbert_fuller553.jpg

The Driver is Elbert Fuller. My Grandfather owned the Fuller Farm From 1951 until the Mid 1970,s. Elbert use to come and visit us with my Grandfather at our farm in upstate NY.

My mother has a Milk Bottle that has "Fuller Dairy" on it. No doubt it once road in this truck.

Anyone else have any fond memories, stories, or photos of the daily delivery people, and the vehicles they drove, in the neighborhoods of years gone by???

Please Share it with us. grin.gif Dave!

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At some point in time Wonder, Tip Top, and Bond bread were all owned by the Ward family. It was said you couldn't buy a loaf of bread in New York City without them getting a slice of the action. YES, they invented sliced bread too! This 1911 Mack is far too fancy to deliver bread, my guess is that it housed a calliope.

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I remember the milkman and breadman drove a horse and wagon not a motor vehicle well in the 1950's. We kids would feed the horses a lump of sugar as a treat. We also had what we called a "sheeny man" who drove along the alley with a horse and wagon picking up scrap metal.I also remember having an ice man come every other day or so delivering blocks of ice for the ice-box. Boy I must be getting old :-)

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I remember the Milkman delivering milk in glass bottles, (I remember what the milkman looks like because my little brother looks just like him) but not the bread and ice deliveries. Boy! You are old Dave.

This 71 International ice cream truck isn't as old as you guy's, but it is interesting. A friend of mine bought it a couple years ago. Want's to fix it up someday. As you can see in the pic's, this isn't the best time of year up here in Wisconsin for ice cream sales.

Tom

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I definitely remember the milkman.that stopped in 1970 where we were.now the iceman is a different story.i worked in an ice house in Kingston NY 1983-1986.we made the 300 lb blocks of ice which we cut up into cubes and small blocks.we had two old Ford V8 powered ice crushers for blowing the ice 40 feet into the corn trucks.it had a drum with harden steel spikes which would eat a block of ice in a minute.real medieval machines.

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We had two dairy farms that delivered when I was a kid, Henderson's and Candee's. We used Candee's because they went to our church, and my dad had no use for the Henderson family. The local Dry Cleaner and both grocers delivered. The ice plant no longer delivered, but the coalyard did of course. None of those businesses are still operating. It doesn't seem like that long ago, but I guess it's coming up on half a century.... better go take my Geritol, never mind, that's gone now too!

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This cool 1940 Ford dealer parts delivery truck serviced jobbers around Spartanburg, SC, and was bodied by the Rock Hill Body Company (RHBC) of Rock Hill, SC. The photo is stamped 1941 on back, but due to the lead time it took to create these custom-built rigs, it's likely a '40-'41 model Ford.

41_Ford_Pierce_Service_Truck_300.jpg

RHBC built my '55 Chevy Bookmobile http://forums.aaca.org/ubbthreads.php/ubb/showflat/Main/110492/Number/480988#Post480988

and I've been amassing images from the company, which went out of business around the late-'70's.

Boy, would I love to find <span style="font-style: italic">this</span> beauty stashed away somewhere. 'Cause service trucks <span style="font-style: italic">rock!</span>

TG

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No pictures and I wouldnt know how to post them anyway,but I do remember the milk man.I also remember how the milk would push up out of the bottle in winter.And just for the record Dave I remember where it came from.Out of bed at 430,run like he-- to the barn cause it was warmer than the house, hand milk 40 cows and then pray the fire you started in the kitchen stove befor you left for the barn took hold.I remember the ice box too. Befor moving to the farm we where city folks. Lived next to the R R tracks. Refrigartor cars that came in where cooled with huge blocks of ice.After they unloaded what was on the car they would through the left over ice out I used to pick it off the tracks and take it door to door selling it. I think I was about eight or nine. At first the rr folks would chase me off, but after they found out what I was doing seems there was always a extra nice chunk would fall off just when I got there with my wagon.times where tough in the mid 40s but they where also good.

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Every summer, while in high school, I would help my grandpa put up hay and milk the cows. He milked 21 head. The milk was poured into the milk cans and stored in the milk house for pick-up. The milk house cooler was a tank fed with spring water. Same temp all year round. GREAT tasting water! It was all hard work back then and I hated it. But looking back now, they were some of my best memories.

Tom

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I remember the milk man. The other delivery people were before my time. My parents still had milk deliveries come to the house but stopped it after my sisters and I had grown up and moved out. Being that my dad is the only one in their house that drinks milk, it wasn't feasible.

The business is still there, but I'm not sure if they're still doing that or not. I remember the glass bottles, but I don't remember the Divco trucks. Those guys were running Chevy step vans.

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Wayne when I said city I did not mean NYC.Drove beer truck there a few times then through that part of the map away. I grew up in Binghamton NY and Susquehanna PA. About the milk cans in the cooler guys,can you still taste the milk you scoped off the top after it cooled? Come on, fess up.I wasnt the only one to steel all that cream.

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We had a valve in the bottom of our 2000 gallon Muller tank. That's how we got the milk. It had a stirrer in the bottom so everything got mixed pretty well. In the early years we had a Surge milk tank that you could take one of the tops off of and get the milk out. I was too small then to reach it but my dad use to bring home a gallon from the tank every day and the cream floated to the top. I belive the milk today is just watered down with "Flavoring" added.

The last delivering dairy we had here was "The Silver Lake Dairy." And they drove Curb Master step vans.

Dave! smile.gif

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I can remember as a small child in NE Ohio in the late forties, a local small dairy delivering with a horse and wagon. Later the milk was delivered in a Divco truck. I still shake the milk jug to this day to mix up the cream. The breadman also came around daily.

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In Eastwood, suburb of Sydney Australia, I remember Bread being delivered by the baker in a single axle horse drawn wagon in the early 50's. Also milk delivered in bulk, for want of a better term, where a metal container with lid was left out with a note for the Milkman as to how much was required and he'd pour and measure the quantity, then came the glass bottles, what a step forward! The postman would walk his route with a big leather satchel carrying the mail. And the neighbours all pitched in one year and bought him a new satchel as a christmas gift. The local grocery store did home delivery in the early 50's using a motorcycle fitted with a BIG box instead of a side car. And then there were the "dunny carters", before the sewer was connected, in their "40 door sedan" in the 70's when we lived in the blue mountains west of Sydney.

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The Divco's were used in So. Cal for the Helms Bakery Company in the 30's. The company continued into the late 60's early 70's with several variations and makes of vehicles. They started out with the items accessible from the inside and ended up with the product accessible from the rear. There is a very nice, award winning 31 Divco restored as a Helms truck local also.

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Iwas born n 1940 in a country area , i cant recall a milk or bread delivery,or even a dunny cart , for toilets we usualy had what was called A long drop or a chemical toilet .When i moved to "town") when i was about 15 or 16 there was a milk delivery with 1 qt glass bottles. that has all but gone , the last glass bottles were delivered about 10 years ago , after that it was plastic, even that service has almost gone , with the milkman supplying only customers that preorder,and servicing the local supermarkets and corner shops , which we call dairys

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How about Jewel-T..? My father was a Jewel-T route salesman in the 30's and 40's. They used panel trucks to deliver their wares. The trucks went door to door in the semi-rural area, pedaling soap, coffee, Tea, etc, just about any and every product a housewife could use. They used dishes as premiums to help sell their products. Buy so much product and you would win a dish. Housewives would collect entire sets of dishes, etc. In those days of extremely tight money, those dishes were godsends..!

Their "Hall Autumn Leaf" china was extremely popular, and today is quite collectable.

http://www.chinaspecialties.com/jewel_t_&_autumn_leaf.htm

They had competition with a company using a similar method of distribution called "Grand Union" Both of those companies were big in middle America.

I also remember getting coal, ice, milk, bread delivered. And the famous Helms fleet in Long Beach

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RocketDude,

Forgot I had this in the Archives...an article about '36 Plymouth Commercial Cars from <span style="font-style: italic">Plymouth Sales Promoter</span> magazine, Volume 7, Issue 22, December 1, 1935. Was this one like your father drove?

36_Plymouth_2.jpg

For the complete article, click the link below and click the image once to enlarge. You'll also find A&P and Lever Bros. products delivery sedans.

http://photos.aaca.org/data/500/36_Plymouth.jpg

Enjoy,

TG

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That is a great article, TG57Roadmaster. It's a keeper.! I will make a copy of it, even if it does have a Chrysler product in it...

I was a few years away from being thought of in '35. I believe my parents were married in 1937, since I still have the restored 1937 Philco Chair side radio they purchased when first married. That's the same Philco we listened to "Intersantum" on while growing up , and were too afraid to go to sleep.

I believe my father went to work for Jewel-T in 1938. From pictures I have seen in the family archives, his first panel was a 1938 Chevy. I believe the salesmen purchased the vehicle of their choice, and the company paid for them.

Not much has changed since then, I still have a garage full of Chevrolets, along with my '51 Olds.

I sent this thread to my older sister so I will see if my memories were even close....

Thanks to all for the memories..... That could be a song title..!

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I lived in Ottawa, Canada from late 1946 to late 1948 (age 9-11). In the Rockcliffe Park suburb, milk and bread were home delivered by horse-drawn wagon. (But not ice; Canada's capital was urban and well developed, and everyone had a refrigerator.) In the pre-global-warming days, Ottawa had the reputation for having the coldest winters of any capital city in the world, even colder than Moscow's. In the winter, the delivery horses still came around, but they were pulling sleighs.

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I remember some of the home delivery services in Southern California in the early 1940s - Helms' Bakeries Olympic Bread - Union Ice in the midnight blue trucks - and Adhor Milk ("for those adorable babies" - no fooling). The Helms truck that's been at Hershey the past two years is a dead on restoration. Adhor's trucks were Divcos. The Union Ice trucks were more heavy duty.

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