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Dave@Moon

$100/barrel. What will it do?

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G'day all, I have read the thread with great interest as Australia is, like the US, a net producer of oil, but prefers to seal it's own wells and import crude, charging at imported prices, whether domestic or imported oil is used. We are currently paying about $A6.50 per Imperial gallon ( roughly $A5.20 per US gallon for 91 octane unleaded), for which our Government gets a 43% slice as tax. I have over 40 old cars (from 1927) and bikes ( from 1907) on the road. I always use one of my old cars as the towing vehicle, to add the enjoyment and risk of not getting there to the overall adventure of the run. I find that petrol is expensive but many of us have compensated on long trailer runs by staying at trailer parks with friends, rather than staying at motels, etc. The difference in accomodation costs usually covers the additional petrol costs. I believe that we should still travel wherever and whenever we want, we just have to get a bit smarter about where to justify the costs of the trip. Just my thoughts on a Universal problem. best regards Peter Toet

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As a reminder I can tell you that we pay US $6.35 for a 1 gallon here in Sweden.And you can take a look at the site what happend in Sweden in the summer.All of my cars need about 1 gallon every 10-15 miles. http://www.bigmeet.com/

Buick 1923-34 4cyl.

Buick 1924-35 4cyl.

Buick 1925-25 6cyl.

Buick 1956-76C

Exelsior Super X 1929.MC

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Wes, if the trailer queens disappear, cars like this one below would rapidly deteriorate. I realize everything can be driven, but cars like this need to be preserved at all costs, in my opinion. wink.gif

Wayne

14458HERSHEY_06_SAT_014A.jpg

Hershey Show Field-2006

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Many trailer their cars for several reasons, especially to non show tour type events. You need to carry extra parts, luggage, vehicle to small, etc as typically these are 4 day plus events. We are not talking show cars. Most of your antique insurance carriers require the vehicle to be locked up in something and not sitting outside for a week or so.

Then there are those who think you should drive to a tour and back 2 or 3 thousand miles on the crazy interstates with a vehicle that is wide open at 50 or 60 MPH pounding the parts into oblivion. Some of these parts cost thousands of dollars, some you just can't get anymore, and some need hand made.

As Wayne stated those who use a trailer for the Concours to bring out their high dollar vehicles I thank. I like many enjoy seeing these beautiful machines that their owners spent big dollars restoring.

There is room in this hobby for everyone including those who use a trailer for whatever reason.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Ron Green</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Many trailer their cars for several reasons, especially to non show tour type events.

<snip>

There is room in this hobby for everyone including those who use a trailer for whatever reason. </div></div>

Ron, good post.

Now for a few more reasons:

- Traveling on a highway a tractor trailer tire shreds launching very large pieces of tire at the other vehicles behind it.

- Traveling to an automotive event on a Sunday moroning a pickup truck drops it's load of flea market (non-auto) items including 8' tables

and chairs on the road right in front of you.

- In a hotel parking lot a moron with an older vehicle SLAMS their car door into the side of your antique vehicle hard enough that your car shakes violently.

- Other cars in a hotel parking lot are broken into and have parts taken off of them

- Highway department line painting truck is painting the center line on a two-lane road and there is no where to turn off.

(Yellow stripes did not come from the factory on my car.)

- Deer crossing the road. (Some older cars do not have the best headlights or brakes.)

- On the drive to a car event, someone runs a VERY RED LIGHT and comes with a few feet of hitting your antique car.

- Sitting on the side of a highway late on a Sunday afternoon trying to fix an ignition problem on your antique car, 100+ miles from home.

- The roadway was JUST resurfaced and you drive a White Antique car.

- On the way home from a car show heavy summer downpours FLOOD many streets and highways forcing you to make a number of detours.

A trip that normally takes 2 hours, takes 7 hours.

Some might say all of the above are things that happen when one drives a car on public roads. That is true.

Unfortunately, when one spends YEARS and lots of hard earned money restoring a vehicle the above incidents cause one to reconsider

one's position about buying, owning and using a car trailer.

People can call my antique vehicles "trailer queens", I take no offense.

For me, using the trailer is all about trying to protect and preserve a piece of automotive history so that others can see and enjoy it.

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Fantastic Leif. I knew there were some American cars in Europe but I had no idea. I'm really glad you folks are enjoying "our" cars. Now if I can just figure a way to get a Euro. car, say a Ferrari...........Bob

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">As Wayne stated those who use a trailer for the Concours to bring out their high dollar vehicles I thank. I like many enjoy seeing these beautiful machines that their owners spent big dollars restoring</div></div>As much as I hate to say this Ron, I have a feeling that most of the people that own these types of cars aren't impacted by higher fuel prices anyways.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> People can call my antique vehicles "trailer queens", I take no offense.

For me, using the trailer is all about trying to protect and preserve a piece of automotive history so that others can see and enjoy it. </div></div>

Well put Ron and Charlier. Two of my cars are drivers to the extent that my insurance allows and three are "Trailer Queens". I'm actually proud of the term and use it myself.

I've spent many many thousands of hours and many more thousands of dollars bringing them back from near death to the point that they are pure works of art. And like any piece of art they are meant to be admired, not exposed to the dangers of the every day world. If I could I'd put them in my living room. Does the fact that they are trailered to a show diminish their beauty or my enjoyment of them? Not in the least. Before I started trailering I've been behind sand trucks, caught in storms, been tail gated by 18 wheelers, spent hours fixing stone chips, stayed in motels that were crack houses, etc. etc. Now when I close up the trailer on one of my "Queens" I get a nice warm feeling of both security and responsibility.

Like you say ,Ron. There is plenty of room in the hobby for those who value driving, those who value preservation, and everything in between. ..........Bob

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When my '41 is finished, it'll be a trailer queen for the first year while I'm trying to win some awards with it. After that, I'll drive it locally, maybe as far as Flint, but for longer distances, it'll go back on the trailer for the same reasons as above. There's just too much that can go wrong, both on and off the highway.

Also, the Dodge has A/C & music. The Buick does not. That matters when you're sitting in an un-airconditioned car with leather seats for hours and hours in the summer heat, especially with your wife.

I don't imagine that the Dodge gets much worse mileage than the dual-carb'd Century will. Empty or full, the Dodge gets 10 MPG. Anyone know how much the Buick will get at 70 MPH? 15? 17?

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'Wes, if the trailer queens disappear, cars like this one below would rapidly deteriorate. I realize everything can be driven, but cars like this need to be preserved at all costs, in my opinion. '

Here is the thing about that, cars are meant to be driven not trailered, unless they are unsafe, or unable to take the hills. A car like the one pictured, has obviously been restored and it can be restored again and again and again. And there is a place for trailering, if a car is rare or completly original, but, I have been to shows where people trailer the common models like a '57 chevy,etc. As for Charlier's list of reasons, that is why you have good insurance on the car, in case any of those happen. (If you are at a hotel at a show, get a room with the window facing the parking lot, drive something with door locks, use a CLUB, put in a kill switch (hidden so, judges don't see it) put on a gas shutoff, unplug the battery (most people don't know how to start the old 20's and 30's cars anyway) and park it next to other cars, where it is not as noticeable not at the very end of the parking lot.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1948Lincoln</div><div class="ubbcode-body">As for Charlier's list of reasons, that is why you have good insurance on the car, in case any of those happen. (If you are at a hotel at a show, get a room with the window facing the parking lot, drive something with door locks, use a CLUB, put in a kill switch (hidden so, judges don't see it) put on a gas shutoff, unplug the battery (most people don't know how to start the old 20's and 30's cars anyway) and park it next to other cars, where it is not as noticeable not at the very end of the parking lot. </div></div>

Good insurance is a MUST however insurance will not help an owner track down a part that took them 10-12 YEARS to find that has now been damaged beyond repair.

Personally, I have used some of the suggestions you list above. Unfortunately, in some cases they simply were not enough to prevent or minimize damage/loss.

Wes, I do agree cars should be driven. I think we differ on this subject when it comes to the where, when and how far.

In recent years I have started to drive my older vehicles early on Sunday mornings over a 30+ mile circuit that covers a variety of roads.

I have seen a noticeable increase in the number of Antique, Classic and Custom Rods being driven on my Sunday morning trips.

It would appear I am not the only person who likes to exercise their vehicle on less crowded roads.

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I can agree with Wayne and Ron insofar as the truly rare, high dollar vehicles must be trailered to be seen safely. There is a point where investment outweighs the NEED for Joe Doaks or the Gomer brothers to get a view of a $600,000 car driving on a freeway.

As for making fun of Pebble Beachers' cars and attitudes I'd be pretty damned paranoid if I'd just finished a 500K restoration of a 1938 Delage, Delahaye, Rolls, Talbot or Maserati with the usual fair of stumble-by hicks with their brood of sticky, drooling clones trailing behind at an auto event.

Guys with "regular" vintage vehicles are wary enough of viewers I've noticed with signs on all corners as they sit for hours, eyes on their cars.

As for upscale exotica, frankly I'd appreciate going to a venue where the best of show is a 1947 Cisitalia 202 or a 1939 Bughatti 57 instead of a 1957 Chevy or 1956 Ford.

The Concours people and the folks who actually run vintage race cars at real races have my vote for having all the trailered cars they can afford. Can you imagine destroying a Pegaso or Scarab even though you have the funds to rebuild it and race it again?

Thankfully the Concours people will continue to show their cars at safe venues whatever fuel costs. When spending $2 million to rebuild a race wrecked Maserati gasoline just becomes something to wash parts in.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I don't imagine that the Dodge gets much worse mileage than the dual-carb'd Century will. Empty or full, the Dodge gets 10 MPG. Anyone know how much the Buick will get at 70 MPH? 15? 17? </div></div>

Matt, there is a huge difference between 10 and 15 mpg (which I think is a fairly accurate highway estimate for your car). That's a 50% increase over the Dodge. On a 2000 mile trip at $4/gal. that represents a $266.66 savings (<span style="font-style: italic">and a savings of 1293 lbs. [159 cubic ft.] of CO2 contribution to the atmosphere as well!</span>).

Also a very common trick during WWII with dual-carb Buicks was to block off the second carb. I know it was effective, but I don't have any hard numbers on how much of a savings it was <span style="text-decoration: underline">and</span> any numbers you might get wouldn't correlate to interstate travel anyway.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> This is the other thing I was anticpating, the eventual slow death of the trailer queen. It definitely could make for a superficially less impressive field at national shows, at least among those cars that are still viable (however marginally) for interstate travel. That's not all bad however....</div></div>

This is what I said. Saying something isn't "all bad" implies some of it <span style="text-decoration: underline">is</span> bad, of course. Anyone interpreting my post to be an anti-trailer queen rant is nuts!

Nobody ever will or should drive high-six and seven figure cars to shows, especially given the unlikelyhood of any fuel savings in the first place. In that rarified crowd the cost of preservation includes the trailer. I'm a major advocate of driving our cars as much as possible, and the erosion of the cult of perfection that's been built up over the years. However even I would look askance at anyone driving I-70 accross the state in a Duesenberg, Winton or Stanley!

There are people, though, who trailer Mustangs to keep the tire treads clean for show. This is what I think will end soon.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave@Moon</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> However even I would look askance at anyone driving I-70 accross the state in a Duesenberg, Winton or Stanley!</div></div>

Don't look askance at me, Dave. If I had a Duesenberg, I'd drive it until the wheels fell off. With the exhaust cut-out WIDE OPEN and my foot on the floor. grin.gif

If you can afford "the world's fastest truck," you can probably afford to feed and clothe it.

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As much as I hate to say this Ron, I have a feeling that most of the people that own these types of cars aren't impacted by higher fuel prices anyways.

These are the same people that many of their cars run out of gas going up the ramp of the auction block. I remember last year the one TV announcer said a lot of cars ran out of gas while waiting line. A half million dollar car and the owner didn't want to get stuck paying an extra $3 for gas.

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Add to your list:

-- bring your car home that has had major breakage or failure.

I brought one home on 3 wheels inside the trailer a few years back.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave@Moon</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

...I think most people, when looking at 2 identical cars--one that's perfect and been trailered 1000 miles and another that started out that way when it left home on its own 1000 miles ago, are more impressed by the driven one. At least I feel happier standing next to an old flathead 6 that's just been through a rite of passage getting there that no trailered car knows, and I don't think I'm alone. Also a 20 mpg ride in a DeSoto sounds more interesting to me, <span style="text-decoration: underline">and</span> more financially viable, than a 12 mpg tow rig ride. smile.gif

</div></div>

There's nothing I would like best than to drive one of my Metropolitans to Macungie like I did in 1983. But with the speeds on the freeways averaging 80 I don't think this is going to happen anytime soon. Although the Met will do 65, it's still not fast enough for most people. Maybe in the future the government will reduce the speed limit to 55 to conserve energy (like that's really going to happen) then it would be a pleasure to drive the cars there. So for now we park 2 inside my son's 28 footer and tow with his Silverado duel wheelie with diesel. Last year he averaged better than 20, pulling all that weight.

IMG_0110-1.jpg

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Nice rig!! We are just too busy here lately for me to spend much time on the forum. Our staff has been working very late and we are in the process of looking at hiring another person to take the load off. As such, I do not want to add to any controversy. Trailered or driven makes no matter to me as it is a personal decision. In many cases the car itself determines the use. Not sure I would want to drive my 1903 Olds to all meets!

I do, however, want to dispel the doom and gloom that the high fuel prices are going to drastically effect our shows. Sure some have to make a tough decision and save on expenses for all sorts of good reasons. The interest in our meets this year is huge. We are expecting more cars than last year. Cumberland has forcasted 1,000 cars and Charlotte is expecting around 700! Based upon the requests coming in I think they are going to be realistic goals.

Maybe some won't eat for a week, give up the evening cocktail or avoid the movies for awhile but if this is your hobby you will find ways to participate. The cost of going to shows, food, tickets etc. has never been minimal but somehow most of us find a way to deal with it. In some cases we may cut back but that usually means we go to more local shows than before.

In any case. I sure I hope that at the end of the year the figures will back this up but right now the interest is still high! We have some terrific venues this year so I hope to see all of you at least at one event!

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Matt Harwood</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave@Moon</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> However even I would look askance at anyone driving I-70 accross the state in a Duesenberg, Winton or Stanley!</div></div>

Don't look askance at me, Dave. If I had a Duesenberg, I'd drive it until the wheels fell off. With the exhaust cut-out WIDE OPEN and my foot on the floor. grin.gif

</div></div>

HAHAHAHAHAHA YESSSSSSSSSSSSS YESSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I knew I couldn't be the only one!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

One of the reasons (though relatively very insignificant compared to the big one) why I'll never own one of those. I probably SHOULDNT. Wow I would put so many miles on it that it would seem evil. And I'd probably want to take it a step further. Pipes from each exhaust port right out the side!!!! laugh.gifeek.gifcrazy.gif OHHH yes (only because that could be easily returned to original whistle.gifwink.gif ) and yeah same here I would wind 'er right up through the gears. Jeez it would be hard to resist layin' down rubber! And I DONT mean to have the attitude that I would abuse the vehicle, that's terrible...but sheesh it was the Ferrari of its day, how do you think it was intended to be driven!!!!!?

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Leif Holmberg</div><div class="ubbcode-body">As a reminder I can tell you that we pay US $6.35 for a 1 gallon here in Sweden.And you can take a look at the site what happend in Sweden in the summer.All of my cars need about 1 gallon every 10-15 miles. http://www.bigmeet.com/

Buick 1923-34 4cyl.

Buick 1924-35 4cyl.

Buick 1925-25 6cyl.

Buick 1956-76C

Exelsior Super X 1929.MC </div></div>

Leif, I'm curious to know what the average family income is in Sweden, perhaps in a place comparable to New York, in US dollars? Just to put things in perspective. Thanks!

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Twitch,

'As for making fun of Pebble Beachers' cars and attitudes I'd be pretty damned paranoid if I'd just finished a 500K restoration of a 1938 Delage, Delahaye, Rolls, Talbot or Maserati with the usual fair of stumble-by hicks with their brood of sticky, drooling clones trailing behind at an auto event.'

First, when have you ever seen people of this type at Pebble Beach? or Concours? Making fun of types of people is not the way to garner more classic car fans. (This is part of the reason that the classic car 'thing' is falling apart, because it is slowly become more and more elite on the Natl. level) As for the $5000000 restoration,if, they are worried about their cars, they can save the bragging rights and the white gloved, champaigne drinking car show for other cars who's owners do not mind people looking at them from 2 ft. away.

'Guys with "regular" vintage vehicles are wary enough of viewers I've noticed with signs on all corners as they sit for hours, eyes on their cars.'

These people have only become wary because everyone thinks that every old car is worth a fortune!

'I can agree with Wayne and Ron insofar as the truly rare, high dollar vehicles must be trailered to be seen safely. There is a point where investment outweighs the NEED for Joe Doaks or the Gomer brothers to get a view of a $600,000 car driving on a freeway.'

I also said that if the car is unsafe or very very rare that it SHOULD!! Be TRAILERED! And this is where it gets sticky, people should be able to look and enjoy ALL old cars, they are not an 'Investment' in my opinion, and if they are for some, then you need to get out of the hobby and collect something else, like gold or stamps or something!, because it is people like you who have made the prices of even the most easy to find Classics, Mustangs, etc. go sky hi to where young people are unable to afford them, because everyone thinks that they have a gold mine on their hands! You should be in the hobby because you enjoy it! Not for an investment, and a $600,000 dollar car should not be driven on the fwy. anyway! maybe on surface streets, if you have enough money for one of those cars, then you have the money to fix it if something happens! Jay Leno drives his cars all the time! 'Joe Doaks' has just as much right to see you car (as long as he does not scratch it, etc.) as the glove wearing, champaigne drinking, fru fru folks at Concours or Pebble Beach. And as far as I know the 'Gomer' (or maybe it was just Gomer Pyle?) brothers fixed old cars in Mayberry on Andy Griffith back in the 60's

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Zondac12,

YES! I completly agree! WAY TO GO! I WOULD DO THE SAME!!!!!

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GRANNY'S 70 SKYLARK,

Here is the thing about gas prices in Europe, within 10 minutes, some are in a different country, they do not have to drive 50 miles to get to work everyday, if they drove 50 miles they would either be in the ocean or in another country! That is what no one seems to realise with the price difference and this proves my point, that when the gas mileage is increased and cars get 40-100 and up miles a gallon the prices will be raised so, they will still be getting the same money but, with less product used like in Europe!

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