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Headliner replacement, 22nd Series


49 Packard
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Hello All,

I'm at the point where I'd like to attempt the replacement of the headliner in my 1949 22nd Series Deluxe Eight.

I see that Kanter, Fryer's and others sell pre-cut and pre-sewn material for this, and that there are replacement tack strips available. I also have read the section on this in the Packard service manual.

My question is for any of you that may have done this job yourself: Do you have any suggestions or ideas to offer to help me get started properly? Maybe avoid some pitfalls?

Thanks in advance,

Jay

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It may be an idea to replace the windlace at the same time and weather stripping around the doors, only because the windlace goes around the doors first/ stapled/ nailed, then there is like the nailing strips for carpet that goes over that, then the fabric headliner is pushed in between the strip, and the windlace. you may have to pull out the rear window as well to fit it under the rubber trim too..

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There should be directions with the headliner.

It is not very hard but it is a fiddly job to do right. Allow plenty of time. An afternoon should be enough especially if you have a helper.

First you have to take the steel rods or bows and slide them into pockets in the new headliner. If the bows are rusty you will want to paint them with rust proof paint beforehand.

Then you stick the bows into position. Fasten the headliner at the back with a few staples. Then move to the front.

Once you get it nice and neat front and back you work your way around the sides.

You will have to pull it loose and get a new position once or twice.

Pull it just snug enough to take out the wrinkles but don't pull it any tighter than you have to. A few small wrinkles at the corners are normal. Don't worry about them at this point.

Once the headliner is all stapled into position you can trim away any excess material and put the trim back on.

Finally use a steamer to steam out any remaining wrinkles. If you do the job properly there should be only a few minor wrinkles at the corners, at the back.

The headliner will shrink up by itself over time and stretch itself taut. This is one reason you don't want to stretch it too tight.

It's not very hard if you have patients. Your wife will probably be a big help if she is used to sewing and fitting clothes.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Clipper47</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rusty_OToole</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It's not very hard if you have patients. </div></div>

Does this mean it is easier if you are a doctor? smile.gif Sorry I couldn't resist. </div></div>

No not Easier, Doctors just get Paid More for doing it! laugh.gif

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Rusty,

In removing the old headliner I "discovered" that there was a sheet of fiberboard, probably intended for sound or thermal insulation, above the bows and against the roof metal.

This fiberboard was thoroughly deteriorated and had come loose at every spot. It was only in place because the bows held it there, but it had drooped everywhere. I assume most cars had something like this, but this is the first headliner I've had off and it was new to me.

The roof interior has a bunch of rust discoloration (see the picture). I'm concerned that should I try and deal with all that surface rust I would surely get spray, drips or rust powder stains somewhere in the car interior.

My question is, would you worry about treating it or just install the new headliner as-is? I'm never sure if I'm being lazy or smart. If you have a suggestion for doing something with the rust I'd love to hear it. If it were anywhere but inside the car I'd be spraying it down with RustOleum.

Jay

RustPost.png

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I would cover your interior (seat, etc) with a drop cloth and scrape out all the out insulator, and loose rust, and then paint it with a good quality rust coverup paint (POR-15, Rust Encapsualtor, etc). Then once dry, use a newer style foil backed insualtor that you would apply with a spray adhesive. That sure give you superior sound, and heat barrier.

Once all that is done, then install your new headliner without worry.

Just my $.02

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Jay,

Your picture of the inside roof rust looks exactly like the inside of my roof. The only different is that I had rats living in the headliner when I found my car, so I swore I was going to have Hanta Virus before I was done ripping out all the old headliner.

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It may be a good idea to remove all the black retaining clips and repaint them as well. You will have to remove them anyways, to get all the old fabric out of the clips and you will then see how the windlace is also installed ( small carpet tacks) then the black retaining clips are put in..

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