Jump to content

Your favorite Lincoln?!


Recommended Posts

No funny stories yet. This is the first Lincoln I've ever had and all I've been doing is fixing it up. Haven't driven it a foot. Come to think of it, this must be how British sports car owners feel...;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh boy Wes, you open up a can of worms here, I dearly loved my '41 Continental, but I have to say I loved this immaculate '41 club coupe more, even though it was 14 years old at the time, it was as like new as it could be, spode green, always garaged, and totally pampered by it's elderly owner, the funny is that when I, a precocious 21 year old answered his newspaper ad, and he fired it up and let me listen to it in his driveway, it was making an ominous knocking noise in the V-12, and after a few minutes made a distinct breaking sound. All attempts to re-start it failed, and the 12 whirred like a sewing machine. I told the man I was sorry, but I could only give him $35 for this broken Lincoln, he countered with $50, and as I started to walk away, he hollered, "WAIT", and we towed it home with a rope, which you could still do in 1955. The timing gear had broken. Not too funny I guess, but true-

post-51946-143137960855_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I guess my very favorite Lincoln would be the 1941 Continental. I have wanted a 41 Continental Convertible ever since I can remember and finally was able to get one in March of 2007. It's a mostly original, relatively umolested car.

The retrieval trip to Iowa in March was OK until we got the car loaded into our trailer. The weather closed in on us and we slid off the road near Ames, Iowa into a snowbank. It was a NASTY night and I-35 was littered with wrecks. We had an extra nearly complete driveline in the back of our truck including the origial 16 inch wheels and several boxes of miscellaneous parts. The truck and trailer combination probably weighed around 8 tons. Fortunately, a big rig tow truck was working a wreck just 1/2 mile down the road and he soon was able to drag us back onto the highway. Our son, an ex-18 wheeler driver drove down from Minneapolis and drove our rig to his home for us. The 41 was anchored very securely in the trailer and sustained only slight damage to the left rear fender where it bounced against the trailer fender well. The Iowa highway department closed I-35 and I-90 later that night, but we managed to get to Minneapolis with no further mishap. We thank GOD that we left the highway where there was NO steep ditch and were able to continue our trip without injury or significant damage! The attached photo was taken the next day. NOT my kind of weather!!

A Webshots photo album of the 41 Continental can be viewed at: http://rides.webshots.com/album/557478162IZJiRf

A close second favorite Lincoln would be the 1939 Zephyr convertible, the last of the really art-deco Lincolns but that's another story.

post-32768-143137960861_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Has to be the 40/41 Connie Convertible for me. Took me three years to talk the previous owner out of the one I have. The day he finally relented, I took the rest of the day off and had a flat bed come get it and drop off at a buddies house as I had no garage at the time. Went to turn the steering wheel, LOCKED! Took apart the lock and got it inside the garage. Asked the previous owner to look for the keys, no luck. Built a garage, got car home and started taking it apart, located the keys in the drivers side rocker panel, inside the mouth of a petrifyed rat! I still have the car, the keys and the Rat. This is how I found the car back in 1972.

Link to post
Share on other sites

well, my favorite was / is my current ragtop. I love those original pics..little rough but original is sooooo cool..rolf has some more fun pics..c'mon rolfe..

what the 'ell is a rathole..rat thing ratnest???cmon Boz??

dont even use that rat thing name to describe a classic Lincoln Continental..it just aint right...next thing it'll get LS (mazda) drivetrain!!

post-42764-143137960879_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK Jeff, here is one that might qualify, this is the car my son and I began in 2002. It was completely rusted out and bent besides, there is a funny story that goes with it, my son Doug called me and said, Dad, where can we get a curved windshield glass for the Z, I was just tightening the frame and it cracked." I replied, "Doug, those windshields are totally flat, what do you mean curved?". It turned out the car had been hit so hard from the left front, it had driven the WS opening back about 2". With a lot of help from Merv Adkins, it is now a very nice resto-rod, with a 302 SBF, AOD etc, Doug has grown to really like the car, so the tradition continues-

post-51946-143137960902_thumb.jpg

post-51946-143137960904_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread! My favorite is a 1941 LC I purchased in 1966 while I was in the Marine Corps stationed at Cherry Point NC. It had an Oldsmobile "Rocket" V8 coupled to the Lincoln transmission and stock rear end. It was really a quick car on the road - surprising many unsuspecting drivers. I located a V12 in a wrecking yard in Wilmington NC and retrofitted it into the '41. It was all put together and ready to drive when I was transferred and had to move to the west coast. Even though everything seemed to be in order, it would not start. Fortunately, I had rigged it with a tow bar for the move, so I had my wife tow me around the base with our '62 Continental tow car, trying to get the car to start - no luck. We finally departed with the '41 in tow. I tried unsuccessfully to get it started at almost every stop. Finally, when we were stopped for the night in Memphis, I pulled the distributor for the nth time and looked again at the new points and decided to gently dress them with a small file. Voila! it started on the next try and I drove it around Memphis for several hours. The rest of the trip was uneventful. Driving a Continental with a Continental in tow gave a new meaning when we crossed the Continental Divide.

Norm

FORCAPOAS204.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rolf,

I was stationed at El Toro in 1968 when they were filming Tora Tora Tora. All of the Japanese planes were reconfigured T-6's and BT-13's and were flown out of El Toro for some of the filming before they were sent to Hawaii. I believe the aircraft immediately behind the '41 were modified T-6's.

Norm

Link to post
Share on other sites

Far out!! I didn't think it looked right for a zero, but the meatball threw me, I wonder if the Confederate airforce has any that still fly?? They used something pretty close in the "flying Misfits" or what ever they called the Pappy Boyington TV series. I always thought it was funny that when ever a bi-plane is needed in the last 40 years, they always use a good old Tiger Moth

Link to post
Share on other sites

The movie planes are still around - I would guess that the CAF (now it's called the Comemmerative Air Force) would have a few. There were about 24 of them created for the movie. The only fully authentic real flying Zero is at the Planes of Fame Museum at Chino. It was flown in Japan a few years ago; most Japanese people had never seen one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You know, the airplane I think is most like the Zephyr to my mind is the WW2 German fighter, the Meserchmitt 109, it's design was taken from a famous racing plane, and I really like the looks of them. This pic if it will come up is a 109K, which had a hopped up water cooled V12, and would perform like a P51 Mustang

post-51946-143137961288_thumb.jpg

post-51946-14313796129_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...